Fetched from ClimbNZ on Nov 17th, 2017

Showing all routes 99 routes total

Alpine - 99 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+

Showing all routes 41 routes total

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Alpine - 41 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Most climbing on the St Arnaud Range is accessed from the upper Wairau valley, but the range can also be reached from Lake Rotoiti and the Travers River in Nelson Lakes National Park.

Access: Most peaks are reached from tributaries of the Wairau beyond a locked gate at Six Mile Creek. From St Arnaud head towards Blenheim on SH63 for 9km, then turn onto the skifield road. After about 3.5km the road is joined on the left by that from the homestead, 1.5km back down-valley. Continue from the homestead turn-off for 13km to the locked gate. Beyond here you pass the Hamilton River (6.5km from the gate) and Connors Creek (12km). To get into the Rainbow Valley, turn right onto a 4WD track just before the road swings left to cross the Wairau River, 15km from the locked gate. Park near the pylons. The farm manager no longer permits 4WD vehicles up the riverbed. Rough but okay for mountain bikes. Access to the western side of the St Arnaud Range is from the shores of Lake Rotoiti or from the Travers Valley. From St Arnaud, a track leads to the range via Parachute Rocks (1470m) in about 2½ hours. A range traverse south, towards Rainbow Skifield and Mt McRae is a good day trip, particularly for ski touring. Access down to Lake Rotoiti is easy in several places. Easy ridge travel and good ski touring along the range from Pk 1880m (above St Ronans Well) almost to the Camel.

The skifield road is open for foot access year-round but to vehicles only when the skifield is open. From here there are good day trips by foot or skis. Note that if you walk out of the area controlled by the skifield, you are required to sign an intentions book. The operators are responsible for safety, and don’t want to search needlessly for a walker or climber or the occupants of a vehicle that hasn’t left at the end of the day.

Access: The skifield road is open for foot access year-round but to vehicles only when the skifield is open. From here there are good day trips by foot or skis. Note that if you walk out of the area controlled by the skifield, you are required to sign an intentions book. The operators are responsible for safety, and don’t want to search needlessly for a walker or climber or the occupants of a vehicle that hasn’t left at the end of the day.

Above Rainbow Skifield

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St Arnaud Range
Grade 0
From the skifield head south-east up easy slopes to Mt McRae. Continue south to a saddle overlooking the Arnst basin and east towards Pk 1915m. Beyond here, the range is rugged and it is necessary to descend and sidle below bluffs, then regain the ridge in the vicinity of Pk 1880m. The range south of here is easy ridge travel, and can also be reached easily via a track up the true left of St Ronans Stream (no longer maintained but easily followed, through open forest into delightful tussock basins). Some superb campsites near tarns.
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Lake Rotoiti Route
Grade 0
Ascend the scree just north of the Lake Head Hut jetty and then the obvious gut, topping out on the range above Rainbow Skifield. Head south over easy ground.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2205 m

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Fifteen Mile Spur

Access: Hamilton River (http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/si/nelson-lakes/st-arnaud-range/hamilton-river) Connors Creek (http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/si/nelson-lakes/st-arnaud-range/connors-creek) Begley Creek (http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/si/nelson-lakes/st-arnaud-range/paske-creek-upper-rainbow-river-and-begley-creek)

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North Ridge
Grade 0
Via Hamilton River. Ascend through open forest north of the eastern feeder to a basin below point 2154m. Head south-southeast to a small saddle above, and follow the ridge to a prominent step below point 2154m. Climb the step direct or turn it on eastern slopes. Pleasant scrambling leads to the summit. Alternatively, descend from the small saddle, sidle eastern slopes, then climb directly to the summit.
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East Face
Grade 0
Via Connors Creek. Climb steep scrubby gullies or scree and tussock slopes to a basin on the east face, then directly to the summit. Alternatively, climb easy slopes to a basin south-east of the summit and onto the narrow south ridge.
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West Face
Grade 0
Via Begley Creek. Climb up the waterfall creek west of the summit, and to a saddle on the south ridge. Follow the narrow ridge to the top.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2216 m

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1 pb130127

An attractive peak visible from near the gorge in the Rainbow. Slightly East of St Arnaud Ra.

Access: Rainbow River (http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/si/nelson-lakes/st-arnaud-range/rainbow-river) Paske Creek (http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/si/nelson-lakes/st-arnaud-range/paske-creek-upper-rainbow-river-and-begley-creek)

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North Ridge
Grade 0
Follow the south branch of the Rainbow River to a good campsite at 1470m, near a small waterfall on the true right. Scramble up dry watercourses, steep carpetgrass and easy rock to the range north of Paske. The final ridge is interesting.
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West Face
Grade 0
From the south branch of the Rainbow River, climb scree basins and chutes to the ridge south of the summit.
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South East Ridge
Grade 0
From Paske Hut cross the creek and follow it upstream, then angle upwards through open forest into a tussock basin above a waterfall. Either climb open slopes on the south face to the summit pyramid or, from an obvious saddle, climb the interesting south-east arête.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1940 m

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St Arnaud Ra

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From Travers Valley
Grade 0
From the hut, climb snowgrass and then scree. Angle north-east until a small bluff gives routes to the saddle. Descend loose rock and steep scree to the west branch of the Begley. There are small campsites near the bush edge. Generally good travel on the true right bank. Cross the main Begley Creek and climb a bank to pick up the track 200m south of point 1072m.
Alpine - 32 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

St Arnaud to Hanmer Road Built in the 1950s to service the hydroelectric power pylons marching northwards, this follows a historic droving route up the Wairau Valley and into Canterbury. The historic cob-built Tophouse accommodation house (near St Arnaud) is still in use, while the old Rainbow Homestead (also cob construction) is used during summer when the road is open to the public. It is a public road as far as the Rainbow Skifield turnoff.

Access: This is a public road as far as the Rainbow Skifield turnoff. Just beyond here, there is a gate at Six Mile Creek. During summer, this is usually open, and a $25 per vehicle road toll collected at the old Rainbow Homestead, 10.5km further. The DOC Visitor Centre at St Arnaud can advise on the road opening times. Although 4WD is seldom needed, the road can get washed out in several places, making it difficult for lower suspension or 2WD cars. However, it's easy for mountain bikes. Locked gate information The road is a toll road managed by Rainbow Station (Star Holdings Ltd) and is open from 26 December to 5 pm on Easter Monday. There is a $25 toll per 4WD vehicle, $15 per motorbike, $2 per mountain or push bike, $2 per tramper. Outside the open period contact Star Holdings Ltd to arrange access through the station to 4WD, tramp, hunt, fish or mountain bike. The DoC website also has information.

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

The Raglan Range runs between the Branch River and the Wairau Valley.

Access: Lees Creek At about 6km beyond the locked gate at Six Mile Creek there is a footbridge over the Wairau River, and a track to Lees Creek Hut (4 bunks, standard).

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The Peak is slightly east of the main Raglan Ra. Scott Stream is the easiest access.

Access: Scott Stream is the easiest access. From Greigs Hut cross the Branch, following a track into the stream. Good campsites in a basin at 1200m. In winter, ice forms in runnels and on buttresses above the campsite.

Attribution: Ben Winnubst. photo Mark Holmes

1
Standard Route
Grade 0
From the basin climb easy, scrubby slopes on the true left of the stream into tussock basins and scree below the peak. Ascend easy slopes to a notch just south-west of the summit.
2
South Face
Grade 0
The gully in the centre of the face leads to a steep traverse to the left, and is a good winter ice climb.
3
North East Ridge
Grade 0
Climb scree slopes east of the peak to the ridge. Follow the ridge till a ledge allows bluffs and gendarmes to be turned by traversing slopes on the Silverstream side to regain the upper ridge. . Can also be done from the Silverstream-Branch River confluence.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
From Lees Creek Hut follow tussock flats and then foot trails through forest to point 1144m and a river flat. Climb into the side stream on opposite bank, taking care beside a mossy waterfall, then follow loose rocky ribs onto pleasant easy slabs leading to the summit. Descend the north ridge into a basin and back down the stream. A good summer day trip.
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North East Face
Grade 0
Easy travel beyond point 1144m into the southern head of Lees Creek, where there is a delightful campsite under beech trees at the junction of the two southern feeder streams. Open forest and then scree leads to a large basin under the peak. Climb an obvious shallow gully to this highest point on the Raglan Range.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Wairau Valley

Access: From the power pylons, follow farm tracks up the Rainbow River; this is the main access route to excellent climbing in the headwaters. Two hours of easy riverbed travel brings you to a gorge. Rainbow Hut (4 bunks) on the south bank is now controlled by Rainbow Station. Climb around the gorge on a stock track on the true left and descend to Rainbow Junction flats.

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St Arnaud Range

Attribution: Photo & text by Ben Winnubst

A
North East Ridge Grade 2
Grade 0
Via Rainbow River. Climb a broad, scrubby ridge from the junction of the north and south branches of the Rainbow, then sidle along a shelf (great campsite) and diagonally up narrow exposed platforms to a col north of the peak. Follow the range to the summit. Beware of avalanches on all slopes.
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West Face / North Ridge
Grade 0
Without crossing the swingbridge, follow the old track on the true left. From a large boulder at the southern end of the large clearing east-southeast of Mt Franklin, climb through forest to the bushline. Sidle upwards, crossing into a basin with a large tarn. Climb scree towards a col north-east of Mackay (map ref. M30/878040), and along the ridge.
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South Ridge Grade 2+
Grade 0
A steep ridge rising from the northern pass (see route 6.06) can be bypassed via gullies falling to the source tarn of the East Sabine. Climb a large couloir at the head of the tarn, up a rock step and onto Peak 2180m. Gendarmes on the narrow main ridge to the summit can be sidled or climbed over.
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South Ridge
Grade 0
Rianbow River. Pleasant scrambling up a long ridge between two streams from north bank of the Rainbow River.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
From the north bank of the Rainbow River, climb up the true right bank of the stream south of the peak, and into delightful tarns surrounded by red rock. Climb scree to the ridge east of the peak, then a steep scramble to the top.
Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

St Arnaud to Hanmer Road

Access: Easy to get to even without a key or 4WD, being only 30min on the MTB from the skifield car park. A marked track follows the true right bank of the Hamilton River. Where it peters out continue up the bouldery riverbed to campsites in the upper basin near the bush edge.

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St Arnaud Ra

Attribution: Ben Winnubst

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Hamilton Route
Grade 0
Approximately 1km past the Hamilton River track end a creek from The Camel tarns emerges. Proceed another 250m, cross the river and enter the bush just west of another smaller creek. Continue on the true left of the creek, cross the main creek at 1280m, and aim north-west to point 1790m. Follow the St Arnaud Range to the summit.
A
St Arnaud Range Route
Grade 0
A short distance up the Arnst River climb a spur to the range, taking care to avoid bluffs in the bush. A rock scramble leads to the summit. Descend north-west from Pk 1785m down a spur on the true left of a creek.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
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St Arnaud Ra

Attribution: Ben Winnubst

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East Face
Grade 0
Via Hamilton River. Climb easy tussock and scree slopes to the summit.
B
South East Ridge
Grade 0
From Hamilton River. A striking ridge gained from the saddle at 1675m to the Begley. Steep towers can be turned via western slopes.
A
South Face
Grade 0
Via Begley Creek. A narrow steep gully (visible from the flat just downstream of Begley Hut) angles up right from the bottom of the face to the South East ridge. Take the left exit option, and follow the ridge (or a slope on the north side) to a knob south-southeast of the summit, then cross a basin to the summit ridge. A more technical variation is to climb part way up the gully, and then sidle left across a steep snow-covered slab and up a snow slope to a blocky rib. The easiest descent (or ascent) route is via a large basin and gully south-west of the peak.
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North West Face Route
Grade 0
Cross the river just below John Tait Hut (Travers Valley), and follow downriver a short distance to a bush spur leading above the bushline to scree basins. Steep gullies lead to the ridge north of the summit.
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South West Ridge
Grade 0
The scree basin of North West Face Route (Travers Valley), leads to a col; the final 60m of rock ridge is interesting.
Alpine - 15 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Drains into Upper Wairau Valley.

Access: From the Rainbow Junction flats just above the gorge, stock tracks up terraces on the true left of Paske Creek lead to Paske Hut (6 bunks, standard). About 1½ hours travel up the Rainbow there is a second fork; the north branch gives access to a delightful tussock basin under Kehu Peak, and the south branch leads to Mts Paske and McKay, and a good saddle to the large tarn source of the East Sabine. Begley Creek From the Rainbow Junction flats, a track leads to Begley Hut (8 bunks, standard) and saddles with Connors Creek and the Hamilton River.

Mtweld3

Named for Frederick Weld, who in March 1855, with Alphonse Clifford, climbed onto a high point on Turk Ridge and spotted Tarndale, which led to the upper Clarence and opened up the important droving route to Canterbury.

Attribution: Ben Winnubst

A
South East Ridge
Grade 0
From the Hydro Rd. Follow a 4WD track to power pylons on the end of the spur. Pleasant ridge scrambling leads to a difficult notch at about 1950m. Turn it by descending steep slopes on the east, crossing a gully and climbing up the final easy slopes to the summit. There are easy descent routes via scree and tussock into streams on either side of the ridge.
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North Ridge
Grade 0
Climb a tussock ridge south-east of Paske Saddle stream and then a narrow ridge (or a shelf) to Mt Dora. Mt Guinevere is to the south-west of Dora.
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South East Ridge
Grade 0
Easy riverbed travel from Island Gully Hut Upper Wairau Rv, leads to a pleasant campsite at the junction of the two source streams of the Wairau. Climb easy slopes from the eastern source stream onto the ridge, north of peak 1820m. Scramble over several minor bumps and narrow rocky sections till below a steep buttress guarding the summit pyramid. Follow leads up on ledges and steep but generally sound rock on the eastern side till above the buttress. Scramble along narrow ridges to the top. The easiest descent (or ascent) is north-east down Turk Ridge, then easy scree into the head of the stream. Mt Guinevere is an easy scramble south-west of Dora.
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South Gullies
Grade 0
Follow the western source stream of the Wairau, bypassing a waterfall on the true left, into a scree basin and tarn. A steepening snow-filled couloir tops out above the buttress of SE Ridge route.
Alpine - 9 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Screen%20shot%202011 06 29%20at%205.54.44%20pmScreen%20shot%202011 06 29%20at%205.55.51%20pm 01 pb130092

All routes reached from the Begley and Rainbow valleys are steep, and probably best done as spring snow or ice climbs. This magnificent peak has some of the best climbing in the park, with nice rock on the normal summer route, and more difficult winter and spring climbs. It is the only major Travers Valley peak visible from Lake Rotoiti, and is named after Thomas Brunner’s Maori guide Kehu (or Ekehu) without whom his epic 18 month journey from Nelson to Paringa would have been impossible.

Attribution: Photo & Text by Ben Winnubst

A
South Face Gully
Grade 0
Via Begley Ck. The face is split by an obvious hanging gully, very steep at the bottom, then at an easier angle to the short ridge joining the north and south summits of Kehu. In October the steep bottom of the gully is one pitch of consistently superb plastic ice, about 75º. Magnificent.
B
South Face Direct
Grade 0
Via Begley Ck. To the right of the steep gully (South Face Gully route) is a shallow steep gully. Angle up to the top edge of a steep snow-covered slab. Traverse the slab a short distance (very exposed) or crawl under a small rocky overhang onto easier slopes, topping out on the south summit.
C
West Face Gully
Grade 0
Via Begley Ck Climb around the toe of a buttress and into a wide easy gully on the western side of Kehu. Look for an obvious gully on the right, walled by steep rock. The gully snakes up and tops out above the buttress, beside two shark's teeth shaped rocks. Traverse across and into the hanging gully of South Face route . Alternatively, climb to the ridge above, from where it is possible to descend onto upper slopes on the Travers side (see Travers Face Route & West Face routes). Other ice gullies on this face have yet to be explored.
D
Travers West Face
Grade 0
Via Begley Ck. The wide gully of West Face route leads to the ridge between point 2096m and the summit. Descend on the Travers side and sidle steep slopes or a gully to the peak.
E
Begley Face
Grade 0
Keep mostly on the true right of the west branch of the Begley, through bush into an upper basin. Climb easy slopes and at map ref. N30/902080 cross a spur into a hanging valley north-east of the peak. A narrow gut at the head of the valley, to the right of rock bluffs, tops out just north of the summit. Alternatively, snow slopes to the left of the bluffs lead to a gully, which tops out just south of the summit.
F
North West Face
Grade 0
From Upper Travers Hut, climb tussock and scree to a wide shelf. Sidle south then ascend a major scree basin under Kehu to the steep firm rock of the face. There are several routes onto the rock face (e.g. via a short gully on the lefthand edge) leading to the range above and then a scramble south to the summit.
G
North Ridge
Grade 0
A traverse of the divide from Begley Saddle is long. A sharp rock fin requires cheval tactics then the ridge rises in steps. From a shallow col descend west to North West Face route.
H
West Ridge
Grade 0
Via Travers Valley. The south-west head of the scree basin in route 5.12 leads to slabs and ribs under a low point on the divide. The spiky and difficult ridge rises steeply to the summit.
I
West Face
Grade 0
Via Travers Valley. Follow the basin in the West Ridge route south, around the toe of the north-west face, to where a steep and rotten gully (good ice in winter) gives a route to the divide immediately north of the summit.
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Paske Creek Route
Grade 0
Belvedere is an interesting peak, being located at the top of the Buller, Clarence and Wairau catchments. (A ‘belvedere’ is a raised turret or lookout for viewing). From Paske Hut follow Paske Saddle route to Paske Saddle and then the easy ridge to Belvedere. A good day trip from Paske Hut is to climb Mt Paske, then traverse Belvedere before descending a couloir and directly down, or else continue to Paske Saddle, and returning to the hut.
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From Clarence Pass
Grade 0
From the Clarence pass, good ridges lead east to Belvedere Peak and west to Pk 2085m. A steep scree gut on the west side of Pk 2085m descends to the head of the east branch of the Waiau. On the south side, bluffs above the head of the Clarence must be avoided.

Showing all routes 16 routes total

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Alpine - 16 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

The Travers Range is the most popular climbing range in the Nelson region. Both easy and challenging routes exist on the four main peaks: Angelus, Hopeless, Cupola and Travers. Access is best via Robert Ridge (see above) or the Travers Valley. As well as the track and huts in the main valley there are tracks into three side creeks and three high huts: Lake Angelus (36 bunks, serviced), Hopeless Hut (6 bunks, standard), Cupola Basin Hut (8 bunks, standard).

Access: Access is best via Robert Ridge or the Travers Valley.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1877 m

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Robert Ridge offers a high route to Lake and Mount Angelus at the tip of the Travers Range.

Access: Drive west along SH63 from St Arnaud and turn left on to West Bay Road. Follow it for 5km, crossing the Buller River and climbing to the upper Mt Robert car park. Walking time from here to Angelus Hut (36 bunks, serviced) is 5-8 hours. The route to Angelus Hut along Robert Ridge is a superb ski tour but beware of avalanches on the two sidles. A more sheltered access is via the track to Speargrass Hut (12 bunks, serviced) and then a poled route to Robert Ridge, or via the Cascade Track up Hukere Stream (beware of ice here in winter). Allow 5-7 hours for either option (less if you take the water taxi for the latter).

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Robert Ridge Peaks
Grade 0
From the car park the Pinchgut Track climbs to Bushedge Shelter at the bushline, just north-west of Mt Robert (1421m). For a good round trip continue to Relax Shelter then head east to Bushline Hut (14 bunks, serviced) and descend Paddys Track to the car park. The main ridge track continues up a tussock spur to Second Basin, overlooking the old skifield. Follow the rock and scree ridge over Flagtop (1690m) and above Third Basin to a notch below Julius Summit (1794m). To continue south along the Robert Ridge, descend scree to a hanging basin on the west side, sidle under Julius Summit and regain the ridge. Follow the ridge above Fourth Basin to a south-east spur at its southern end. Peaks 1885m and 1877m on this spur are steep scrambles. The track to Lake Angelus sidles the western end of this spur, down to a saddle at the head of Speargrass Creek. Climb to the ridge above, on the eastern side of the lake, and descend scree to Angelus Hut.

Showing all routes 5 routes total 2260 m

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Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
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Several good routes are possible from Cupola Basin Hut, including some buttresses of reasonable quality rock.

Access: Cupola Basin Routes A marked track to Cupola Basin Hut leaves the Travers Valley at a small clearing. At 1370m and with spectacular views nearby the hut is well sited for climbs.

Attribution: Ben Winnubst Text & upper photo Lower photo: Craig Potton

A
East Face
Grade 0
An imposing series of red rock buttresses. One route goes up the first red buttress on the left of a faultline on the right of the face. The first two pitches are loose, with a grade 16 crux on the second pitch. Three more pitches lead onto easy ground, then traverse to a final pitch which leads to the top of the faultline. Further left, there are two more routes (grade 13). There is also a route on the buttress right of the faultline (grade 16, reasonable quality rock).
B
North Face
Grade 0
From Cupola Basin Hut, sidle up to a big scree fan on the North Face. The usual summer route is a zigzag ledge on a rib between deep gullies. A hanging scree shelf above is crossed to its eastern edge where firm rock leads directly to the summit. The gully left of the zigzag ledge provides good climbing when snow-filled.
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North Gully
Grade 0
A very narrow gully starts from the left edge of the North Face fan (North Face route) and exits on easy slopes below the summit. The route is visible from points south-west of the hut. Belay up a 2m step of water ice over steep rock (small wedge or piton needed). Continue over a smaller ice step and then easier ground. Note that the steep walls above the gully catch the early morning sun, so be sure to reach the upper gully before the hummers reach you.
C
North West Ridge
Grade 0
This is gained from the top of a scree fan between Cupola and a dome-shaped peak to the north. Shaky pinnacles and a deep notch make the route difficult.
D
South Ridge
Grade 0
This ridge is gained from Gunsight Pass and sweeps steeply up to the summit. An excellent winter climb.

Showing all routes 8 routes total 2338 m

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Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
Screen%20shot%202011 06 29%20at%206.01.00%20pm 0Screen%20shot%202011 06 29%20at%206.01.23%20pm

The highest point on the Travers Range, with routes accessible from either the upper Travers Valley or Summit Creek.

Attribution: Ben Winnubst

A
North East Ridge
Grade 2
Gain the ridge from the junction of the creek with the Travers River, or more easily from Summit Creek via scree or snow slopes, left of a buttress. The ridge gains height gradually in a series of steps, then becomes narrow and broken. Eventually the upper basin in Summit Creek route is reached. Do not traverse onto the steep and loose east face.
B & D
Summit Creek Routes
Grade 1
A relatively easy summer route. From the Travers valley, follow the true left bank of Summit Creek into a tussock basin (small campsites here). Climb a wide gully between the north-east ridge and north buttress over tussock, scree and easy slabs. From an upper basin which usually holds snow, angle south-west to the summit ridge and the final climb to the summit. Alternatively, climb scree west of the north buttress till below the peak, then easy loose rock to the summit ridge.
C
North Buttress
Grade 2.25
A climb recommended for experienced climbers only. Follow Summit Creek route to scree 200m above the toe of the buttress to a narrow couloir rising steeply from scree to crags above. A four metre step near the bottom requires friction holds. Above a ledge the couloir is walled by loose rock. Once on the buttress follow the jagged ridge around the upper basin rim to the summit. Note: Grade is unconfirmed.
E
South Ridge
Grade 3
The ridge begins from Travers Saddle. Initially climb rotten rock to a deep notch. Climb steep rock via a crack (2 pitches) angling on to the Sabine side - a rope will be needed. Solid slabs then give good climbing to the summit. An excellent summer route.
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South Face
Grade 3
300m Climb the lower snowfield in the centre of the face, then angle up right close beside the buttress below and right of the upper snowfield. Five 60m pitches to reach the South East Ridge just below the crux of that route.
F
East and South East Ridges
Grade 3.25
These ribs separate the east, south and south-east faces of Travers. The principal difficulty is a rock step near the top, above where the ribs join. Climb it direct or turn it via a steep ramp. Once on the south ridge easy slabs lead to the summit.
G
East Face
Grade 2
This face of steep loose rock has been ascended, but is not recommended as a descent route. Note: Grade is unconfirmed.
H
North East Ridge from Upper Travers Hut
Grade 2
Cross the river and ascend the scree opposite the hut. Cross a broad south-east falling tussock spur, below a buttress, and sidle into the next basin to the north-east. From the head of this basin follow ramps and ledges onto the ridge, then North East Ridge route to the summit. This is a good descent route.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1790 m

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Between Mt Cupola & Mt Travers

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From Travers Valley.
Grade 0
An alternative to Travers Saddle. From Cupola Basin Hut sidle under the eastern slopes of Mt Cupola into a large basin. The pass is the low point at the head of the basin. It is also possible to traverse scree slopes on the west, under Mt Travers, to Travers Saddle.
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From Sabine Valley
Grade 0
From the swingbridge across the East Sabine gorge either climb a forested spur to a shoulder above the bushline, or follow the Travers Saddle track up to the bushline and sidle to the top of the same shoulder. Continue sidling from the shoulder to a large scree. Skirt above or cross the scree to a steep gut that leads to the pass. From the slopes below the pass it is possible to reach the steep western gullies and spurs of Mt Cupola, but it is not known whether these have been climbed.

Showing all routes 1 route total

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The Ella Range divides the D’Urville River and the Matakitaki River.

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Ella Range Tops and Mt Watson, (Matakitaki Route).
Grade 0
From the site of Matakitaki Base Hut (now removed) an old cut track goes up Watson Creek. Tussock basins lead to the range north of Mt Watson. The tops can be followed north to Mole Saddle, or southwards (keeping on the western slopes just north of point 1870m). An old cullers’ route south of Peak Creek to the tops (shown on map M30) is not signposted and is difficult to follow.

Showing all routes 11 routes total

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Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

At the head of Lake Rotoroa, that other jewel of inland Nelson, are the Sabine and D’Urville Valleys. Surrounded by extensive beech forest, with great views of the major Travers Range summits, Lake Rotoroa is larger and even more stunning than Rotoiti. There is a camping ground and tourist lodge, but no general store like at St Arnaud. The lake was visited by William Fox, Thomas Brunner, Charles Heaphy and the Maori guide Kehu in February 1846. Stock were once run in the lower valleys and on Mt Misery, but the vegetation has regenerated well, due perhaps to the higher rainfall than in areas further east.

Access: The easiest approach to climbing routes is to take the water taxi up Lake Rotoroa, avoiding a 5-6 hour lakeshore walk. Contact Craig Simpson, phone 03 523 9199. Alternatively, walk from Mt Robert car park to Speargrass Hut (12 bunks, serviced) and the track to Sabine Hut (32 bunks, serviced). East Sabine River At the Sabine Forks, take the track to the swingbridge over the gorge. Cross the bridge to follow the track to reach Gunsight Pass and Travers Saddle. From the bridge, the remnants of an old track follows the river on the true left for about 3 hours to a large grassy flat east-southeast of Mt Franklin. The large tarn which is the source of the East Sabine is further upriver, and can also be reached via Lake Tennyson and Clarence Pass. Good campsite 50m south-west of the tarn outlet. West Sabine River Blue Lake Hut (16 bunks, serviced) in the West Sabine is about 3 hours from Sabine Forks. In winter, large cones of avalanche debris can come off the slopes of the Mahanga Range and cross the track.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2138 m

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St Arnaud Ra

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North Ridge
Grade 0
Climb the rock ridge from the northern Sabine – Rainbow pass.

Showing all routes 5 routes total 2340 m

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Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Highest mountain in Nelson Lakes National Park. First climbed by a Tararua Tramping Club party led by Bill Bridge in February 1947.

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East Sabine Route
Grade 0
From a tussock flat due east of the summit, follow a stream to scrub and steep tussock. Negotiable bluffs lead to a high scree terrace. Climb around the foot of the north-east buttress and up steep scree through bluffs just north of the summit.
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South West Ridge
Grade 0
From the scree terrace described in route 6.10, sidle south around the south-east buttress to steep scree under a high saddle between Franklin and Pk 2291m. From the saddle, pleasant rock scrambling gains the southern shoulder. The final ridge is broad and easy.
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Sabine Forks Route
Grade 0
Half an hour above Sabine Forks, climb a scree fan from the West Sabine on to Franklin Ridge. A long and arduous route follows the range, turning outlier peaks on the eastern side. The final climb to the summit follows the upper part of East Sabine Route.
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West Sabine Route
Grade 0
From the outlet of Blue Lake, climb through open forest to the bushline, then follow it and sidle up across tussock slopes into a basin in a major side stream that falls west from Franklin. Climb scree to the head of the stream, where scree gives a route on the west face up loose rock and snow to either the high saddle between Pk 2191m and Franklin or its southern shoulder. A good descent route.
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Moraine Wall Route
Grade 0
From Blue lake Hut, climb the North West Ridge route on Pk 2291m. Traverse that peak on moderate rock, or sidle the slopes on its north-west flank into the high saddle between Pk 2291m and Franklin. Pleasant rock scrambling gains the southern shoulder.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2291 m

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Franklin Ridge

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North West Ridge
Grade 0
From the moraine wall above Blue Lake, a tussock and scree spur gives access to a high scree basin. At its head, climb moderate rock on the right of a couloir leading to the ridge. An exposed section of ridge can be turned on the southern slopes.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2232 m

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Franklin Ridge

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South Ridge
Grade 0
From the moraine wall above Blue Lake sidle high above Lake Constance to a high col (map ref. M30/835036). From the col a narrow ledge angles on to western slabs and regains the ridge above a vertical section. The remainder of the ridge is narrow and difficult.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2220 m

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Northern Peak 2220 of Franklin Ridge

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North Ridge
Grade 0
A short ascent up loose rock and slabs leads from the saddle in the South Ridge of Peak 2232 to just north of the summit.
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South Ridge
Grade 0
Tussock slopes at the head of Lake Constance lead into a scree basin south-west of the peak. Hard routes up rock ribs or guts gain the south ridge.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2220 m

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Southern 2220 of Franklin Ridge

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North West Face
Grade 0
Head south-east from the head of Lake Constance, and climb tussock spurs to a long scree ribbon falling between rock ribs and reaching high on the face to a point hard under the west rib. Ascend this, then climb a gut on to the west rib, near the summit.

Showing all routes 16 routes total

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Alpine - 16 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Lake Rotoiti and the Travers Valley at its head is surely one of the most scenic places in the upper South Island. Mixed beech and podocarp forest extends down to the lake shore, and in winter, there are glimpses of rugged snowclad peaks.

Access: Well formed tracks and day walks lead from St Arnaud village to the tussock and scree tops of the St Arnaud Range, and also along the Robert Ridge, thence by a high route to Lake Rotoroa and Lake Angelus. A water taxi operating on Lake Rotoiti saves the three hour walk around the lake (Contact Bill Butters, Rotoiti Water Taxis, St Arnaud, phone 03 521 1894). It takes 5-8 hours to walk from the lakehead to Upper Travers Hut (24 bunks, serviced), via John Tait Hut (3-5 hrs from the lake, 30 bunks, serviced). Lake Rotoiti was first seen by Pakeha in January 1843, when surveyor John S Cotterell, farm worker Richard Peanter, and a Maori guide negotiated the trackless forested terrain from Nelson through Big Bush. They pushed on to the lake head and up the Travers River, and climbed onto the Divide, probably near Cotterell Peak (the name was given by Charles Heaphy and J S Spooner, who came there in December 1843). Within a few years, sheep and cattle were grazing on flat land near the lake and upper Buller River. The legacy of pastoral clearing can still be seen in burnt stumps on the face of Mt Robert, the Travers River flats, and areas of manuka and second growth.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2152 m

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St Arnaud Ra

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North Ridge Grade 2+
Grade 0
From Upper Travers Hut, climb tussock and scree to a tussock shelf. Sidle north to a major scree slide reaching to loose rock under a saddle immediately north of the summit. An interesting rock ridge leads south to the summit.
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South Ridge
Grade 0
The peak can be climbed by traversing from Peak 2156m. In places it is narrow; there is an exposed 15m step.
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West Face
Grade 0
West Face A southern finger of the scree slide in North Ridge route, leads to a narrow gully biting deep into the face. When the gully steepens to vertical rock, an old rockfall on the west side gives a route to firm slabs that gain the north ridge just under the summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2156 m

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St Arnaud Ra

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Divide Ridge
Grade 0
Climb directly from Upper Travers Hut to Begley Saddle. Follow the St Arnaud range north to the peak; a varied climb, tricky in places with a vertical pitch that can be turned by a gully on the east.
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West Face
Grade 0
The huge slabs of the face, split by four couloirs, offer possibilities.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2140 m

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St Arnaud Ra

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Via Pk 2156
Grade 0
The south-east ridge of Pk 2156m leads to a fine peak but is difficult and includes a deep notch.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2075 m

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Named by Stanton and Dumbleton, after they climbed it on an Easter evening.

Attribution: Ben Winnubst, Richard Thomson/ growingwild.co.nz

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North Ridge
Grade 0
From Angelus Hut, descend to Hinapouri Tarn and cross its mouth or waist. The North Ridge is an easy scramble in summer, but in winter is often icy towards the top.
B
Sunset Saddle
Grade 0
Sidle Hinapouri Tarn high on the west then continue up scree and boulders to Sunset Saddle. An easy ridge leads to the summit.
A
Angelus Ridge
Grade 0
Climb the obvious ridge from the junction of Hukere Stream with the Travers River. The upper ridge can also be gained just west of Pk 2037m, via a large scree gully 2.5km up Hukere Stream (map ref. M29/913228). It's pleasant ridge travelling (summer or winter), then a scree descent and traverse to a col overlooking the Hopeless Creek headwaters. The ridge from the col to Mt Angelus is exposed and has notches and pinnacles of loose rock which require careful negotiation. A good summer route.

Showing all routes 7 routes total 2278 m

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Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
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A striking peak, especially when seen from Cupola Basin Hut, with a variety of routes. An excellent spring and early summer traverse is to climb the Hopeless Couloir and descend the South West Ridge or the Hopeless Creek route to Hopeless Hut. Reputedly named by an early survey party with a poor attitude.

Access: Cupola Basin Routes A marked track to Cupola Basin Hut leaves the Travers Valley at a small clearing. At 1370m and with spectacular views nearby the hut is well sited for climbs. Hopeless Creek Routes A marked track leads from the Travers Valley to Hopeless Hut. A popular trip is to continue up the valley and across Sunset Saddle to Lake Angelus. This route angles up scree (the slopes above catch the sun early, beware of avalanches or ice cannonballs) to a ledge, which gains the crest of the cirque headwall. Continue past tarns to Sunset Saddle (see Sunset Saddle Route Mt Angelus).

Attribution: Ben Winnubst. Craig Potton. Davi Jewell.

A
Hopeless Creek Route
Grade 0
Five minutes below Hopeless Hut cross to the true right of a side stream. Climb a steep cairned track on the true right to avoid a deep gorge. Beware of avalanche danger in spring (the route follows an obvious avalanche path). When the stream levels, climb through scrub to a series of narrow ribs (look for cairns here) which lead to an often snow-filled basin (map ref. M30/889178). Head south-west to a col in the east ridge (overlooking the Hopeless Couloir) then climb a gut angling to the Travers Range. In summer or in icy conditions, a safer alternative is to climb from the basin to the outlier peak to the north. A short scramble leads south to the summit. Mostly easy scrambling to the basin, but beware of loose rock (in summer) or winter ice in the gut above. A good descent route.
B
East Ridge
Grade 0
Twenty minutes up the Travers Valley from Hopeless Creek, leave the track and climb to the toe of a narrow scree chute which gives a direct route to the East Ridge. The ridge is long; difficult pinnacles and minor peaks can be turned on the north. Eventually the col in the Hopeless Creek route is reached.
C
North East Ridge
Grade 0
The ridge rises between the side-streams either side of Hopeless Hut, and is easily gained from a basin just north of the basin in the Hopeless Creek Route. Spectacular views from here across huge rock faces in the next side stream above the hut. The ridge has been climbed but is difficult. From the top of the ridge, a narrow broken ridge joins it to the northern outlier peak of Hopeless. Gendarmes on this section can be turned via exposed ledges on either side, or else the broken ridge is avoided by descending a narrow couloir on the Sabine side and regaining the ridge just under the northern outlier.
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North Ridge
Grade 0
A difficult route with a huge gash, a steep face and sharp pinnacles to overcome. The ridge is easily gained from a tributary creek, 1km upstream from Hopeless Hut. Pleasant scrambling over minor peaks is halted at a deep gash. A difficult descent down a steep, smooth and exposed ledge reaches the gully on the Sabine side, below the gash, then from 30m below the gash climb mainly firm rock back to the ridge. An alternative is to descend from just north of the gash into the top of a large basin on the Hopeless Creek side, climb up to the gash and then cross over to climb rock on the Sabine side. Further along the ridge, a second, easier notch is crossed, and up to the top of the North East Ridge. Then follow the North East Ridge route to the summit.
D
South West Ridge
Grade 0
From Cupola Basin Hut, ascend to a saddle on the Travers Range (just below Pt 1989) where the ridge begins. A series of sharp teeth can be turned on the west by descending a gut to a ledge, which angles back to a notch in the ridge. The summit pyramid is steep climbing on good rock. Boulders in a chimney can be turned by a tight crawl underneath.
E
Hopeless Couloir
Grade 0
This is one of the last remnants of the glaciers which carved the mountains and valleys of the park. During summer it becomes crevassed and is sometimes cut off. Beware of avalanche risk in winter. Sidle upwards to the bottom of the couloir from Cupola Basin Hut. The couloir is initially wide but narrows and steepens towards the top where a rope may be needed, and ends at the col in route 5.20. Alternatively, from a bivvy rock or campsites above the forest in the northern head of Cupola Creek climb bluffs to the bottom of the couloir. In winter, there is a technical frozen waterfall ice route (two pitches) on these bluffs.
F
South East Buttress
Grade 0
A striking rock buttress on the right of the couloir.

Showing all routes 2 routes total

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In the western part of Nelson Lakes National Park is the wide Matakitaki Valley.

Access: At Longford on SH6, about 20km east of Murchison, take the road to Tutaki and then south to Ella Station. Gold mining was carried out in the Matakitaki during the Nelson goldrush, and the remains of diggings can be seen in Burn Creek and near the junction of the East and West branches. Peaks on the ranges west of the valley can be gained by rather circuitous routes along the tops, but the best climbing is on the Ella Range peaks. Access is through leasehold land of Mt Ella Station. From the DOC sign near the milking shed an old 4WD track follows the valley floor for 4½ hours to the historic pitsawn Downies Hut, built about 1900 (4 bunks, standard). Interesting and sometimes challenging mountainbiking along muddy forest tracks and easy open flats. Above McKellar Stream the track has been recut around a big washout, making it very rough for biking till the easy Downie flats are reached. Quad bikes are permitted but not 4WD vehicles.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2194 m

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Ella Ra

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Downie Creek Route
Grade 0
A marked track (overgrown but okay to follow) exists up Downie Creek to campsites near the bush edge. Mt Dorothy is an easy climb from the head of the creek. Mt Magdalene is a pleasant climb up a prominent scree/snow gully to the leading ridge and a rocky knoll at the top.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2187 m

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Ella Ra

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Downie Creek Route
Grade 0
A marked track (overgrown but okay to follow) exists up Downie Creek to campsites near the bush edge. Mt Dorothy is an easy climb from the head of the creek. Mt Magdalene is a pleasant climb up a prominent scree/snow gully to the leading ridge and a rocky knoll at the top.

Showing all routes 12 routes total

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Alpine - 12 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

The D'Urville is the longest, most remote, and most heavily forested of the valleys draining into lakes Rotoiti and Rotoroa.

Access: Access is best by boat up Lake Rotoroa (see Sabine Valley). The D'Urville can also be reached over Mole or Tiraumea saddles but the track in Bull Creek is no longer maintained, and the footbridge has been removed. Few climbs are known on the D’Urville side of the Mahanga and Ella ranges. Ella Hut (16 bunks, standard) is now renamed George Lyon Hut in honour of the long serving Chief Ranger who built many of the original two-roomed huts in the park.

Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

The Mahanga Range rises from the Rotoroa lake shore and separates the D’Urville and Sabine Valleys.

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Mahanga Range Traverse
Grade 0
South of Mt Misery the range consists initially of undulating tops and basins scattered with tarns. Ultimately it becomes craggy and lifts in a complicated series of broken ridges to Mt Windward.

Mahanga Ra

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Sabine Route
Grade 0
Just north of Sabine Forks an old avalanche chute leads to steep tussock, scree and broken crags.

Mahanga Ra

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Standard Route
Grade 0
From the head of Lake Rotoroa a track climbs a steepening face on to a spur. At the bushline climb onto the Mahanga Range and follow it up to Mt Misery. The hut below (4 bunks, basic) can be difficult to locate in fog.

Mahanga Range

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Lake Constance Route
Grade 0
From the moraine wall damming Lake Constance a distinctive shelf angles from scree to the crest of the range south of the peak. A long, interesting climb follows the south ridge to the summit.

North of Mt Mahanga

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West Sabine Route
Grade 0
Above the tussock shelf of East Ridge route of Mt Mahanga, a rocky shelf gives various routes to the main range between the peaks.

Southern end of the Mahanga Ra, possibly in the Spenser Mts.

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North Face
Grade 0
Above Lake Constance follow the West Sabine to a basin and a long scree fan. Climb carpetgrass and moderate rock beside a small gorge and traverse to a tussock shelf (or follow the Sabine true left, and to the right of bluffs, onto the shelf). Head south-west towards a col, and then the north ridge (very loose) to the summit pyramid.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
From Waiau Pass the ridge is broad and easy, later narrowing. When an impassable notch is reached, descend south to a shelf and regain the ridge higher up. The remainder of the ridge is pinnacled.
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South East Face
Grade 0
From near the bottom of the Waiau Pass route and the Waiau River, a tussock spur leads to a scree basin south-east of Mahanga. The East Ridge is gained from a snow face.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2263 m

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Ella has three summits; a rope may be needed for the middle and south summits. The middle one is a split pinnacle climbed via a chimney. The southern, highest summit is climbed by a ledge on its eastern side, which can be reached from the snowfield via a col south of the peak.

Attribution: Ben Winnubst

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D'Urville Route
Grade 0
A major stream above George Lyon Hut falls from a large basin. Waterfalls are by-passed on the true right bank. Scree leads to a saddle in the ridge between Ella and point 1951, overlooking a small glacial remnant. From the saddle head south-west then across a permanent snowfield and up to the northern summit.
A
North Ridge and Peak 2189m
Grade 0
Long routes lead over Crag and up to Peak 2189 (used on the first ascent of Ella), or from the tops south of Peak Creek, but it is easier to reach Pk 2189 from the head of McKellar Stream. Traverse the Ella Range from here.
C
Ella Traverse
Grade 0
Angle north-east up a prominent gully on the McKellar Stream face to reach the North Ridge, and follow it to the north summit and trig. The middle peak is a split pinnacle, climbed via a chimney. The south summit is climbed via a ledge on the D’Urville side. A rope should be used for the traverse. Descend by any suitable gully.
C
West Face
Grade 0
A marked track up McKellar Stream gives access to the West Face. From the end of the track angle south-east up scree on the face to a saddle (1966m) below the south ridge. Climb up to the south (high) peak. Turn its steep southern face on the D'Urville side. Direct routes on the face are possible in winter.