Fetched from ClimbNZ on Nov 17th, 2017

Showing all routes 172 routes total

Alpine - 160 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Trad - 7 routes - avg. grade 15 0 - 16 17 - 21
Ski - 4 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 1
Ice - 1 route - avg. grade 4 3 - 4

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1859 m

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Mt%20aicken from%20avalanche%20peak routemark

tba

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Normal Route
Grade 0
Easily reached via a steep walking track that commences at the bridge over Devils Punchbowl Creek. Be careful in winter of corniced snow towards the east.
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No Pant's Nathan
Grade 4
60m Located in the north branch of Graham Stream (Otira E2394300 N5806000). Accessible from above via scree into head of stream from the Mt Aicken track, or from below via Graham Stream. Waterfall ice normally begins to form here in late May / early June, though can be very short lived.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1640 m

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tba

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SW Ridge
Grade 0
Traverse the ridge from PHIPPS PEAK or by ascending the ridge between the big landslide at the top of the Otira Gorge zig-zag and Pegleg Creek

Showing all routes 8 routes total 2054 m

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Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Mt oates routes1 01Mt%2520oates south%2520view routemark

Stands aloft the headwaters of the Mingha River. The normal approach route leaves Goat Pass and climbs easy slopes to Lake Mavis.

Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates

1
From Lake Mavis
Grade 0
From Lake Mavis continue along the Main Divide to join the main North Ridge at the 1978m buttress and turn south to the summit. This ridge is heavily fortified and some handline descents may be necessary. Beware of the soft snow cornice to the east in winter.
2
West Ridge
Grade 0
Sidle around Lake Mavis at its outflow and join the West Ridge of Mt Oates via the obvious long gully between the West Face and a prominent buttress. Much of the West Ridge can be avoided by sidling below its south side to a col near the summit.
3
West Face
Grade 0
The 320 metre West Face rises directly above Lake Mavis. A line can be taken from the northern corner of the lake, diagonally to the true left, directly to the summit. Another more direct route is possible from below the summit, climbing on reasonable rock up through several exposed corners and fissures. In winter/late spring, slab and point release avalanches are commonplace across the breadth of the face. In any season watch for stonefall and general shrapnel spinning off the North Ridge.
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South Summit
Grade 0
Reached either by utilising the scree/snow slopes south of the North Peak (under West Ridge), or by an exposed descent (20m abseil) via the joining ridge between the peaks. It can also be reached via the long ridge from Williams Saddle.
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From Minga River
Grade 0
Reached directly from the Mingha River by climbing the spur on the northern side of Kennedy Falls. From the basin above the falls, ascend the scree slide and couloir to reach the joining ridge between the summits. Climb the loose faces from here.
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From Mid Minga River
Grade 0
Also Mt Williams (1718m) can also be reached from the mid Mingha River, by climbing (bashing) the steep bushy spur almost opposite the southern end of the Dudley Knob track. This route joins the Mt Williams North Ridge near a prominent buttress. To reach Mt Oates descend to Williams Saddle then follow the easy ridge northwards, sidling under its gendarmes and outcrops on the eastern side, regain the narrow ridge, ascending it to the summit of the high peak.
4
From Edwards Hut
Grade 0
Reached along the ridge which leads northwards from Williams Saddle. The saddle is gained by climbing the tussock/scree slope opposite Edwards Hut, aiming for the gap between the two prominent rock buttresses then sidling to the saddle. From the saddle follow the easy ridge northwards, sidling under its gendarmes and outcrops on the eastern side, regain the very narrow ridge ascending it to the summit of high peak.
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Edwards Direct
Grade 0
A more direct approach is by the stream and basin near Taruahuna Pass. Climb the spur opposite Amber Col keeping true left of the stream, then sidle northwards under MT OATES, slowly climbing towards its North Ridge above several large guts. The peak is gained easily from here via (route 8.1). This is also a good winter route to link both Edwards and Mingha Valleys via Lake Mavis.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1440 m

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Southwest Ridge
Grade 0
The Southwest Ridge over THE SPIKE (1440m) is very steep. The route includes several abseils over jagged gendarmes, and some loose inclined slab climbs. In winter other joyful obstacles include a corniced summit cap. Start up the steep creek gully, about 200m up the Edwards River from its junction with the Mingha Valley (this route was originally known as the razorback route for Mt Williams before The Spike was named).
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Gunbarrel Scree
Grade 0
Approached via the long, very steep, dangerous, scree shoot just downstream of the East Edwards River confluence. This shoot is known locally as the Gunbarrel Scree. A quick observation of the riverbed should leave you in no doubt as to why! Climb the scree upwards and southwards into a narrow gut joining the saddle between the two peaks. Both summits can be climbed on rotten rock from this point. Wear a helmet, and keep looking up! A dangerous route.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 1906 m

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Mt%2520stuart south%2520view routemark1 p1240069 0

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Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates

1
Via Hills Peak
Grade 0
Follow the joining ridge with Hills Peak (1640m)
2
Pegleg Creek Route
Grade 0
Commence ascent of West Ridge of Phipps Pk, from Temple Basin goods lift shed (highway 73). Once on the tussock covered slopes begin sidling the contour towards the Pegleg Ck catchment, rising where necessary to avoid multiple gullies. Descend the spur below the 1728 point, crossing Pegleg Ck’s Sth branch, and then continue sidling under the Sth Ridge of Mt Stuart to the basins directly below the summit. From here a series of steep snow/ scree covered slopes lead to the col south of the summit.
3
From Deception River
Grade 0
Ascend the ridge opposite Goodluck Creek, reaching the knoll north of Phipps Pk (This is a bit of a bash!). Traverse through the saddle and ridge to Mt Stuart.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 1718 m

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tba

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From Mid Mingha River
Grade 0
Reached from the mid Mingha River, by climbing (bashing) the steep bushy spur almost opposite the southern end of the Dudley Knob track. This route joins the Mt Williams North Ridge near a prominent buttress. Mt Williams is an easy climb from here.
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From Edwards Hut
Grade 0
An easy climb from Williams Saddle near the Edwards Hut. Williams Saddle is gained by climbing the tussock/scree slope opposite Edwards Hut, aiming for the gap between the two prominent rock buttresses then sidling to the saddle.
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Gunbarrel Scree
Grade 0
Approached via the long, very steep, dangerous, scree chute just downstream of the East Edwards River confluence. This chute is known locally as the Gunbarrel Scree. A quick observation of the riverbed should leave you in no doubt as to why! Climb the scree upwards and southwards into a narrow gut joining the saddle between the two peaks. Both summits can be climbed on rotten rock from this point. Wear a helmet, and keep looking up! A dangerous route.

Showing all routes 4 routes total

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The Aicken Range runs between the Deception and Otehake rivers.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1868 m

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Deception River Spur
Grade 0
Approached via the heavily wooded spur that ascends from the Deception River. This spur is on the true-left of the stream that drains the amphitheatre under its summit. Very ugly best describes this route
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From Lower Deception
Grade 0
Approached from the lower Deception Valley by ascending Midday Creek and its slide. Bear south towards the saddle above Spray Creek and then onto Mt Russell via one very exposed section of rotten ridgeline.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1605 m

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tba

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From Lower Deception
Grade 0
Approached from the lower Deception Valley by ascending Midday Creek and its slide. Once clear of the scrub, continue climbing towards Tarapuhi,a very difficult/horrendous route. From the saddle above Spray Creek a short, very steep, pitch can be climbed on the Otehake side towards Mt Tarapuhi.
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North Ridge
Grade 1
Gain Waharoa saddle via Paruta stream before traversing the tops. The final 1km ridge has several sharp, exposed sections making for an exciting winter climb or a straight forward summer scramble.

Showing all routes 1 route total

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The Bald Range runs between the Taramakau and Taipo rivers

Showing all routes 1 route total 1459 m

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tba

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From Kellys Hill
Grade 0
A very long day outing from Carroll Hut. You must firstly climb Kellys Hill, descending steeply to the saddle on the Bald Range, and then follow a series of terraces to avoid the numerous buttresses on the ridgeback. There are steep ascents on slabby rock as the final approach to the summit is made. The track leading to the Taipo River is overgrown.

Showing all routes 5 routes total

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Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Barron Ridge runs between Hunts Creek and the Rolleston River. Ski Touring. Climb up the steep track from Otira that goes up the ridge on the northern side of Goat Creek (another track, 2km south of Otira, is overgrown). It’s 800 metres climb to where the slopes ease off, and where the snowline often is, at around 1200 metres. Head west through high basins for 2km to the summit of Mount Barron (1730m). On the south side of the peak there is a ski basin that descends into the upper Holts Creek where a campsite may be made. An extended trip could continue along the Barron Range to Lake Florence and beyond. On the other side of the Otira Valley, near the confluence of Barrack Creek, a track climbs through the bush to the bushline at about 1200m and onwards to the summit of Goat Hill (1656m). There is a ski basin in the head of Barrack Creek.

Attribution: James Broadbent

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2110 m

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Waimakariri

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From Waimakariri Col
Grade 0
A short snow climb from Waimakariri Col. A traverse to, and descent off, Carrington Peak can also be achieved. The icecap of Mt Armstrong can be quite unstable at times, as can the glacier descending on to Waimakariri Col.
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From Otira Valley
Grade 0
A long climb that can be done by fit parties in a day from Otira. Follow the Rolleston River Route to where it leaves the scrub and crosses the river. Climb west to the spur separating the Rolleston River from the stream draining Lake Florence, and continue up to the summit. The icecap of Mt Armstrong can be quite unstable at times.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 1840 m

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Waimakariri

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From Otira Valley
Grade 0
A long climb that can be done by fit parties in a day from Otira. Follow the Rolleston River Route to where it leaves the scrub and crosses the river. Climb west, to the spur separating the Rolleston River from the stream draining Lake Florence, and sidle towards the saddle above Lake Florence.
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Via Barron Range
Grade 0
From Mt Barron via the Barron Range takes a good day along a ridgeback that is a minefield of loose rock.
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From Mt Armstrong
Grade 0
From Mt Armstrong, descend to the col above Lake Florence and continue on to the peak.

Showing all routes 5 routes total

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Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ap027 1

The Black Range runs between the Waimakariri and Avoca valleys.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2030 m

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Image03

A rock, scree and snow slope peak, climbed preferably from a high camp in the basins at the head of the Anti Crow River.

Attribution: Graham Kates, www.softrock.co.nz

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From Anti Crow River
Grade 1.25

A
The Sunglasses Route
Grade 2.25
This nine pitch route starts on the extreme right hand end of a large and obvious bench accessed from basin above the waterfalls at the head of the Anti-Crow River. It then follows through a short steep section then follows slabs angling left until on the main arête. The rock is excellent; compact greywacke, great friction, but sparse protection available. From the top of the arête the route follows an easy but broken ridge over a short step to main summit.
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Mt Gizeh-Cow Peak-Mt Damfool Traverse
Grade 0

HST
Harper-Speight Traverse
Grade 0

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Black Range Traverse
Grade 0

Showing all routes 1 route total

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Jellicoe Ridge runs between the Waimakariri and Crow rivers.

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Jellicoe Ridge Traverse
Grade 0
A long, difficult, and dangerous traverse of the Jellicoe Ridge from Mt Stewart, over Mt Guinevere (2042m) and Mt Lancelot (2112m) leads to Mt Rolleston (2275m).

Showing all routes 1 route total

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The Kelly Range is between the Taipo and Otira rivers.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1394 m

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tba

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Via Kelly Saddle
Grade 0
Simple climb from Kelly Saddle and the Carroll Hut. It is a 2-hour climb from Kelly Shelter on Highway 73 to Carroll Hut. The TV repeater is actually on a higher lump (1408m).

Showing all routes 1 route total

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The Polar Range runs between the Edwards and Hawdon Rivers. The three main peaks of the range, Mts Bowers, Wilson, and Scott, can be reached from almost anywhere in the upper Edwards Valley, and can be traversed from either end of the range.

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Mt Wilson-Mt Scott-The Dome Traverse
Grade 0

Showing all routes 1 route total

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tba

Showing all routes 1 route total 1679 m

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Mt Row is at the Northern end of the Poulter Range

Access: Best accessed from the Trust Poulter Hut via Thompson Stream ( a tributary of the Poulter River)

Attribution: Stewart Robertson

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Mt Row from Trust Poulter Hut
Grade 0
A nice day trip from the hut.-Follow Thompson Stream and gain the Poulter Range Ridge where a prominent slip scar allows access. The bush either side of the slip is negotiable Then follow the main ridge to the summit.

Showing all routes 3 routes total

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The Savannah Range runs between the Hawdon and Poulter valleys.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1678 m

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From Trudge Col
Grade 0
Climbed from Trudge Col at the head of the Hawdon Valley. (Grade. 1+) A traverse between RUGGED and SMOOTH PEAKS includes a steep gap in the ridge. (Grade.2-)

Showing all routes 1 route total 1710 m

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tba

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From Hawdom Biv
Grade 0
Climbed from the East Branch of the Hawdon River. From the Hawdon Biv follow the spur at the conßuence of the streams until clear of the small gorge, then sidle towards the saddle at the head of the valley between the peaks. A return trip from SMOOTH PEAK can be made to the junction of the East Hawdon with the main valley over three higher unnamed peaks.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1847 m

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tba

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From Hawdon Biv
Grade 0
Climbed from the East Branch of the Hawdon River. From the Hawdon Biv follow the spur at the conßuence of the streams until clear of the small gorge, then sidle towards the saddle at the head of the valley between the peaks. A return trip from SMOOTH PEAK can be made to the junction of the East Hawdon with the main valley over three higher unnamed peaks.

Showing all routes 2 routes total

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The Shaler Range runs south from Whitehorn Pass, between the Wilberforce and White valleys.

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Mt Murchison-Mt Wakeman Traverse
Grade 0

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Marmaduke Dixon Skyline Traverse
Grade 0

Showing all routes 1 route total

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tba

Showing all routes 1 route total 1720 m

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Snow Cup Range

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South Ridge
Grade 0

Showing all routes 75 routes total

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Alpine - 69 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Ski - 3 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 1
Trad - 3 routes - avg. grade 16 0 - 16 17 - 21

Some of the most diverse climbing opportunities exist in the upper Waimakariri River catchment. Several well-placed huts provide excellent bases for all climbing activity from the river valley and its tributaries.

Access:

Klondyke Corner to Carrington Hut

This is a very popular tramping route for climbers and the many backpackers that also find their way to Carrington Hut, attracted by the dramatic scenery which flanks both sides of the river, and of course the relatively easy nature of the route. Weather very much dictates which route one should take up the Waimakariri River, and whether or not you have an allergy to fording rivers.

In dry weather (when the river is not in high fiow) from Klondyke Corner a route can be picked up the centre of the river flats (this could require three to five crossings of the Waimakariri, and possibly one of the Crow River, depending on both river courses on the day). For those travelling to the Anti Crow River, and upstream, ford the Waimakariri to its southern bank. Staying on the river flats provides the best route around the large rocky knolls at the Anti Crow River confluence. Parties travelling to Anti Crow Hut leave the route where appropriate. A line of sight route is then taken towards the heavily wooded corner on the true left below Greenlaw Creek. Head for the outlet of Greenlaw Creek, and cross the flats towards Harper Creek. Pick up the marked trail on the true left of Harper Creek, following it for only 300m before dropping on a vague but short trail to the Waimakariri flats, skirt the flood debris strewn shingle bank on the true right (next to the Waimakariri), again returning to the riverbed and flats. Head for the obvious bush corner on the true right and follow the entrenched track to Carrington Hut.

Time for this venture from Klondyde Corner is approximately 4 hours.

Note: Greenlaw Hut was removed in 1996 due to earthquake damage.

With persistent wet weather the Waimakariri is not fordable. It should also be noted that several of its tributaries are prone to flooding, in particular Jordan Stream and Anti Crow River. In view of this, a route exists on the southern (true right) bank, from Klondyke Corner to Carrington Hut. This route takes approximately 5 ½ hours. A good track leads from the bridge to Turkey Flat. While crossing the fan stay high to avoid the impenetrable scrub lower down. From the fan, follow the bush edge, picking up a river by-pass track over the bluff just before the Anti Crow Hut. The track continues on through bush and on to the boggy Anti Crow “roche moutonnee”, crossing the Anti Crow and dropping back towards the Waimakariri riverbed (well downstream on the Anti Crow offers the best fording possibilities). The track (if regained) jumps the knoll, then follows close to the Waimakariri riverbed to Greenlaw Creek (alternatively, round the forested knoll, navigating up the valley clear of the Waimakariri torrent). After fording Harper Creek the track re-enters the bush, following a high terrace above the Waimakariri River. Beware of washouts and a notoriously boggy section just prior to the track’s abrupt end at a shingle side-creek. Beyond here regain the river flats of the Waimakariri as the marked trail in the bushline was obliterated by the 1994 earthquake.

Carrington Hut to Waimakariri Falls Hut and Waimakariri Col

Cross the White River near the Waimakariri junction and travel upstream on the true right bank of the Waimakariri River, at first in the riverbed but shortly entering the bush on a well-defined track. The route continues on the true right bank, crossing Campbell Creek in a little over an hour, then turning east towards the gorge at the base of Waimakariri Falls. From here a rough track (staked and cairned) climbs steeply through low dense scrub on the true right side to the footbridge below rock cliffs. Ford the river or cross the swing bridge (an interesting approach) and follow the trail to Waimakariri Falls Hut (3 hours from Carrington Hut).

For those travelling to Waimakariri Col or Mt Rolleston (access off the glacier running from the North West Ridge), head towards the prominent gorge on the true left of the river visible from the hut. When just below the break, cross the river (to true right) and follow a series of scree slopes up diagonally providing a negotiable route around the ravine. Beware of avalanche danger from the ridge running northeast of Carrington Peak. In very low water it is possible to negotiate the ravine using a succession of ramps in the gorge. It is much easier going downstream than up. Once above the gorge, move eastward towards Mt Rolleston or, if heading to Waimakariri Col, continue towards the head of the valley sidling slowly towards the bluffs to the west. About 90m below the ridge turn west and sidle for about 25 minutes (passing a low rocky peak on the ridge running west from Mt Rolleston) to the flat saddle where this ridge disappears under the glacier below Mt Armstrong.

Note: Under winter conditions the route to Waimakariri Falls Hut tends to be difficult to traverse, and find, due to deep snow. Another option (though possibly more difficult) under these conditions is to come in via the Rolleston River from Otira. In good conditions this can take in excess of 7 hours.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1829 m

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Waimak/Taipo

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From Harman Pass
Grade 0
Easily ascended from Harman Pass. It is also possible to follow a route up the scree slide opposite Carrington Hut to the Southern Spur, which then leads to the summit.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2010 m

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Hhh carrington pk

Carrington Pk looks especially attractive from near the junction of the Waimakariri and White Rivers. It is a good climb from Waimakariri Falls Hut.

1
South West Ridge
Grade 0

2
North Ridge
Grade 0

3
Main Divide Route
Grade 0

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Carrington-Armstrong Traverse
Grade 0

Showing all routes 1 route total 1789 m

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Waimakariri

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North East Spur
Grade 0

Showing all routes 3 routes total Time 2 hours 800 m

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Image12

Whale Crag is located 2km west of Anti-Crow Hut, on the true-right of the Waimak, below point 951. The crag offers nice slab and shallow crack climbing with low grades. The setting is very beautiful and it escapes some Divide weather. The lower routes are surprisingly sheltered from the wind.

Access: Access is very straightforward; descent off all current routes is by abseil (50m).

Attribution: www.softrock.co.nz

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Bellbird
Grade 14, 14
1. 15m Start on the bushy lump 10m left of Shallow Splendour. Climb a few crumbly metres to the left trending crack, follow this up to ledge and belay.
2. 25m Climb left up good looking crack through steep section and easily out to bush belay.
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Shallow Splendour
Grade 17, 7
1. 15m Start on left side of main base area. Up and 2m across sloping ledge. Straight up cleaned cracks to belay off bushy ledge.
2. 30m Climb in almost any direction from bushy ledge to the top.
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Ataxia
Grade 16, 7
1. 15m Start up and right of Shallow Splendour, follow right hand side through bulge and up to top.
2. 30m Climb in almost any direction from bushy ledge to the top.

Beyond Carrington Hut

Access: TO UPPER WAIMAKARIRI RIVER (Waimakariri Col) Cross the White River near the Waimakariri junction and travel upstream on the true right bank of the Waimakariri River, at first in the river-bed, but shortly entering the bush on a well defined track. The route continues on the true right bank, crossing Campbell Creek in a little over an hour, then turning east towards the gorge at the base of Waimakariri Falls. From here a rough track (staked, and cairned) climbs steeply through low dense shrub on the true right side to the footbridge below rock cliffs. Ford the river or cross the swing bridge (an interesting approach) and follow the trail to Waimakariri Falls Hut (3 hours from Carrington Hut). For those travelling to Mt Rolleston (access off the glacier running from the north-west ridge), head towards the prominent gorge on the true left of the river visible from the hut. When just below the break, cross the river (to true right) and follow a series of scree slopes up diagonally providing a negotiable route around the ravine. Beware of avalanche danger from the ridge running northeast of Carrington Peak. In very low water it is possible to negotiate the ravine using a succession of ramps in the gorge. It is much easier going downstream than up. Once above the gorge move eastward towards Mt Rolleston, or if heading to Waimakariri Col continue towards the head of the valley sidling slowly towards the bluffs to the west. About 90m below the ridge turn west and sidle for about 25 minutes (passing a low rocky peak on the ridge running west from Mt Rolleston) to the flat saddle where this ridge disappears under the glacier below Mt Armstrong. Note : Under winter conditions the route to Waimakariri Falls Hut tends to be difficult to traverse, and find, due to deep snow. Another option (though possibly more difficult) under these conditions is to come in via the Rolleston River from Otira. In good conditions this can take in excess of 7 hours.

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UPPER WAIMAKARIRI, Ski Touring.
Grade 0
Map K33 Waimakariri Falls Hut (6 bunks, Canterbury Mountaineering Club) is in a spectacular basin, but this is an avalanche-prone place, and a long walk in. Consult Arthur’s Pass DoC staff about avalanche danger and Waimakariri river levels before setting off. There is possibility for an adventurous trip on some nice ski terrain through Campbell Pass, accessed via the upper Waimakariri. At the head of Gorgy Creek there is a tarn near point 1556 where a spectacular camp might be made. By climbing to the head of the basin, one may sidle through the upper Hunt’s Creek underneath the west ridge of Mt Armstrong. After climbing through a col between Mt Armstrong and Anderson Peak, Lake Florence may be reached on skis. Ski mountaineers could continue to traverse the Barron Range over Mt Barron and descend to Otira.
Alpine - 24 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Ski - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 1

A major tributary of the Waimakariri River. Barker Hut, at the head of the valley, is located on the exposed buttress of the White and Marmaduke Dixon glacial valleys. It is the highest hut in the national park (1560m), and provides an excellent base for climbing a variety of nearby peaks. Mt Murchison (2408m) at the head of the White Glacier is the highest peak in the area.

Between White and Taipo catchments.

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From Harman Pass
Grade 0

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From Whitehorn Pass
Grade 0

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Via Kilmarnock Glacier
Grade 0

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From White Valley
Grade 0

Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ap027

A P Harper was a founder member of the New Zealand Alpine Club.

Attribution: Graham kates

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From Harper Creek
Grade 0

Harper camp spur slabs

The approach to these slabs is across the permanent snowfields underlying the north ridge of Mt Speight, then onto the permanent snowfield under the southeast flank of Mt Harper. Both of the routes shown commence near the toe of a rock slab comprising “solid” greywacke, and follow weaknesses in the face.

The face is about 70 metres at highest point and 15–20 metres across. Sixty metre ropes are good, a set of wires with doubles of mids and a handful of cams should see you right.

There is potential for a couple more routes on the face.

 

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Left-hand Route
Grade 0
50m Climbs on the face to the right of the arete. Good gear can be found on the face through cracks and breaks. 50 metres of interesting climbing on good rock.
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Right-hand Route
Grade 0
55m The right-hand route starts near the centre of the face; head up and slightly right following gear to about the middle of the face. Straight up from here. Good gear but a bit spaced at times.
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Camp Spur
Grade 0

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West Face
Grade 0

A
South West Face
Grade 0

B
South West Ridge
Grade 0

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Mt Davie was first climbed by the Arthur’s Pass regulars Fred Kitchingham, Charles Ward and Arthur Talbot in 1912.

Attribution: Graham Kates. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Whitehorn Pass
Grade 0

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From Cronin Stream
Grade 0

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Kilmarnock Spur
Grade 0

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South Ridge
Grade 0

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From Cronin Stream
Grade 0

TBA

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From Marmaduke Dixon Glacier
Grade 1.25
Climb to the col (sometimes corniced to the east) on the spur between the Marmaduke Dixon Glacier and a feeder névé of the White Glacier. Cross this steep névé to the summit. The rocky North Ridge to the true left of the col may also be traversed to the peak, however a traverse on the full ridge from the col adjacent the 2108m point tends to become a full day outing.
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From White Glacier
Grade 3
Approached directly from the névé of the White Glacier by the wide, steep feeder snowfield below the summit. In early summer this route is avalanche swept, and by late summer a bergschrund and rock cliff bar access midway. Certainly not a winter route!
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North East Slabs: Hug a Ginga
Grade 0
200m
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Mt%2520murchison%2520from%2520mt%2520harper routemarkAp030Murchison

Mt Murchison was first climbed by Charles Ward and Arthur Talbot in 1913 from the Waimakariri River, via the White Glacier and North Ridge.

Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

1
White Glacier Route
Grade 0
The usual route follows the glacier (up the true left of the icefall on an ice ramp) almost to Kahutea Col. Stay close beneath the North Ridge, to avoid the crevasse areas and then ascend the last couloir which joins the ridge near the summit. (Note : Wet snow avalanches or stone-fall are not uncommon in this short 60m couloir!).
2
White Glacer Variation
Grade 0
By late summer the above route may be cut by an icecliff for the width of the White Glacier. In this case a good route follows a scree/snow slope adjacent the ridge linking White Col and Kahutea Col. A cross over point onto the White Glacier neve is generally found about 200m up the ridge. In recent years (February) the White Glacier has been cut by a huge bergschrund for its entire width some 150m below Kahutea Col; rock bypasses are very risky to say the least.
3
Kahutea Ridge
Grade 0
The Kahutea ridge can be followed from White Col however be prepared for some very loose, exposed climbs, especially on the final two buttresses.
4
From Upper Wlberforce River
Grade 0
From the upper Wilberforce River via Denas Creek, by traversing upstream to a point directly below the summit rocks. A large scree leads up to a long steep couloir which meets the North Ridge not far from the summit. This route is fraught with dangers, avalanche, rock fall, and really rotten rock to name but a few. It is a seasonal route with a very narrow window of safe conditions (typically August to December, daily conditional). Descent is generally made over Kahutea Col, down the Kahutea Glacier (sticking true left), then sidling left diagonally down to gain the slabs and grassed slopes into Weka Stream.
KG
From Kahutea Glacier
Grade 2
Follow the bouldery Weka Stream, to a basin at its head with bluffs on the eastern side. From here continue north along the base of bluffs, beyond the two side creeks draining the foot of the Kahutea Glacier, to a narrow scree slope hidden in the bluffs that trends up and right. Climb the scree and continue traversing up and right, crossing a rock rib above the northern-most of the two creeks that drain the Kahutea Glacier, and make a short descent into this creek down a slab with small ledges. This creek channels serac-fall debris from the snout of the glacier above and should be crossed quickly. Continue climbing up and right, and cross the top of the next side creek draining the glacier ; from here the glacier itself is a short climb. The true left of the glacier generally provides good travel to Kahutea Col ; from here traverse to the North Ridge and scramble up snow and loose rock on the north and east aspects to the summit.
-
WHITE VALLEY, Ski Touring.
Grade 0
Map K33 Keen types may also consider a trip to Kahutea Col from a base at Barker Hut (10 bunks, pay fees of $5 per night to the Canterbury Mountaineering Club) in the headwaters of the White River. In years of good snowfalls the skinning can begin at the Taipoiti confluence. The recommended route goes up the true left of the White River. Be aware of prevailing avalanche conditions before venturing into this area. In winter a temporary snow-bridge forms over the White River chasm below Barker Hut. Assess its strength and rope-up before using it, alternatively use the ramp a little further upstream (just below the 28m waterfall) or, which would be safer, travel via the terminal of the Marmaduke Dixon Glacier. Note that the nevés of the White and Marmaduke Dixon Glaciers are both prone to avalanches. One ski tour is to the head of the Marmaduke Dixon Glacier to its (corniced) saddle separating it from the White Glacier. Another tour is up the White Glacier to Kahutea Col. The best route is to stay to the true left of the White Glacier’s icefall.
Alpine - 10 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Crow%20glacier%20icefall routemark 0

The Crow valley offers southern approaches to Mt Rolleston, and several difficult routes on to peaks of the Jellicoe Range.

Access:

Crow River via Klondyke Corner

Access to Crow Hut is available from Klondyke Corner in the Waimakariri valley by picking up a trail in the huge tussock flat on the true left of the Waimakariri prior to the Crow River junction. Once the Crow alluvial fan is reached, stay on the true left, crossing to the true right after about 600m, following a marked and cairned route for a further 4.5km (beware of rockfall and slides off the eastern flank of Mt Stewart).

Crow River via Avalanche Peak

Take either the Avalanche Peak Track (behind the Helicopter Pad) or Scott’s Track (leaves Highway 73 opposite Devil’s Punchbowl Creek). The Avalanche Peak Track climbs steeply to the bushline, whereas Scott’s Track provides a somewhat less steep route. Both tracks meet prominent ridges at the bushline. Follow the snow-pole track marking to the summit of Avalanche Peak. In winter do not attempt to cross the snow basins above Avalanche Creek or Rough Creek as risk of avalanche is very high. Time to the peak in summer is about 3 hours. From Avalanche Peak descend to the saddle between Avalanche Peak and the lower peak to the west which continues the Avalanche Peak summit ridge, dropping off the ridge to the north where necessary (scree gully). Sidle the ridge leading towards the Low Peak of Mt Rolleston. A point is reached where this ridge begins to rise noticeably more steeply (the third saddle) towards Mt Rolleston. Here a long, open scree descends to the Crow River. The correct descent scree is visibly continuous to the Crow River! As a further check, the full drop of Devil’s Punchbowl Falls is visible from the correct position on the ridge (stakes may also mark the saddle). In winter this route is prone to slide avalanche. On reaching the Crow River, Crow Hut is a 20 minute rock-hop downstream, situated on a grassy rise on the true right embankment.

 

 

Mt%2520lancelot from%2520southeast routemarkCrow%2520glacier%2520icefall routemark 1

Waimakariri

Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates

-
South East Ridge
Grade 0
Reached by climbing to the Jellicoe Ridge opposite Waimakariri Falls Hut. Take the most direct route possible, slowly sidling southwards to gain the South East Ridge and then the summit. Avoid contact with it’s North Ridge (i.e. avoid the two snow slopes running west off the Mt Rolleston’s South West Ridge).
-
North Ridge from Waimakariri Falls
Grade 0
Mt Lancelot can be attempted by the North Ridge (Jellicoe Ridge) which links it to Mt Rolleston. The ridge is easily gained directly above Waimakariri Falls Hut, however it will be found to be a climb to remember – it is a difficult climb with no protection on some slabs and around the gendarmes.
1
North Ridge from Crow Valley
Grade 0
Follow the Crow glacial approach (route 5.1) towards Mt Rolleston as far as the terminal face of the glacier, then turn west and climb to the North Ridge and on to the peak. This ridge has some extremely steep unprotected climbing, and should only be tackled in summer conditions.
Mt%2520guinevere east%2520view routemark

tba

Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates

-
Via side creek which drains from Jellicoe Ridge
Grade 0
may be reached either by the stream which drains from Jellicoe Ridge 1km downstream of the White River, or by scrub covered slopes opposite
2
Crow Hut Route
Grade 0
Not easily accessible from the Crow Valley, but a route may be followed up the bluffs behind the Crow Hut using the interlocking slabs and screes (steer well clear of the waterfall gullies, Never found yourself in a situation of no return??) to the basins below the peak. Before attempting this route survey it from the summit of Lyell Peak (Grade. 2 for sheer determination)
1
North East Ridge
Grade 0
Bash through scrub 500m south of Crow Hut, to an interesting scree gully at about 1200m elevation. A series of slabs and gullies leads to grassed slopes overlooking a tarn. Gain the North East Ridge at this point and ascend to the summit.
Stewart crow valley

Mt Stewart sits at the end of Jellicoe Ridge, above the lower Crow valley.

-
From the West
Grade 0
Reached by the stream which drains the Jellicoe Ridge 1km downstream of the White River conßuence. Moving east onto the tussock slopes once clear of the bushline, head towards the saddle between Mt Guinevere and Mt Stewart. Both mountains may be reached via this route on their respective ridges.
1
South East Ridge
Grade 0
From the confluence of the Waimakariri and Crow Rivers. An alternative route follows the slope opposite Greenlaw Creek to access the bush line and then sidles east into the south basin and on to the Low Peak.
2
From Lower Crow River
Grade 0
Ascended out of the lower Crow River via the scree (Otira 886035) that leaves the Crow River about 2km upstream from its confluence with the Waimakariri River. Follow the slope around to the south at its head aiming for a narrow couloir/rockgut that ascends onto a spur leading to the 1810m knob (an easier climb with snow). The narrow, craggy South Ridge is then ascended onto MT STEWART. (Ungraded)
3
North East Ridge
Grade 0
Climb the narrrow scree gut leaving the Crow River 150m downstream of the major creek that drains the basins under Mt Guinevere. Ascend 500m then break left or right up the loose steep ground to join the easier slopes of the North East Ridge to the summit.
Alpine - 12 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ski - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 1

The Bealey River drains the Canterbury side of Arthur’s Pass.

-
From Crow Valley
Grade 0
Easy climb by the scree slide which runs from the valley floor to the main ridge 600m upstream of the hut.
-
Via Avalanche Peak Track or Scotts Track
Grade .75
From Arthur's Pass village, Avalanche Peak can be reached from two directions, either by the Avalanche Peak Track (begins opposite the Public Shelter), or Scotts Track (begins opposite Devils Punchbowl Creek). Both are easy ascents. WARNING: Do not attempt to cross the basins above Avalanche Creek or Rough Creek if there is deep snow. The avalanche danger in both these basins is extreme.
Mt%2520bealey north%2520view routemarkMnt%20bealey%20from%20avalanche%20peak%20track

tba

Attribution: Graham Kates

1
Via Mt Bealy Track
Grade 1.25
Reached via the Mt Bealey Track (commences from Highway 73, just south of the Rough Creek bridge). A good days exercise is to ascend Avalanche Peak, then traverse Lyell Peak to Mt Bealey on their joining ridges. Descend via the Bealey Scree into Rough Creek from Low Bealey (1760m).
2
Via Rough Creek
Grade 0
Ascend Rough Creek to it’s headwaters, taking the true right stream fork. This leads to an ugly scree slope directly under Mt Bealey. Its true-right arm leads to the saddle between High and Low Bealey, while the true-left joins the Lyell-Bealey Ridge at a steep sided saddle. All summits are easily obtained from these points. Beware that avalanches can roll for 700m down these routes in winter.

tba

-
From Temple Basin
Grade 1
Easy climbs from Temple Basin. Follow the Cassidy ski tow to gain the area south of Bill’s Basin.
-
Via Cons Track
Grade 1
Reached via Cons Track, which ascends on the Southwest Ridge from the Bealey River crossing on the Punchbowl Falls track. Once the bushline is reached continue ascending the ridge on loose rock. At the base of the bluffs, a rough trail sidles northwards ascending slowly under the bluffs. After 250 metres a steep scree gully is reached. Ascend this to the easier boulder slopes of the main ridge.
-
Aicken–Blimit Traverse
Grade 2
Ascend Mt Aicken. From the summit, the long tortuous ridge that encloses the Punchbowl Falls Creek catchment is visible. Continue along this ridge. Most obstacles tend to be gendarmes, being generally bypassed on one or other side (mostly Punchbowl Creek side). Towards Blimit the ridge rock rises in 30°–60° slabs, some with extreme exposure. Protection is sparse, but the climbing is easy (Grades 12–14). This buttress can be avoided by sidling out under its southern flank and ascending a narrow, loose gully to join the South Ridge. Descend to Bill’s Basin.
-
TEMPLE BASIN AREA, Ski Touring.
Grade 0
Map K33 Temple Basin skifield is accessed via a steep foot track from the summit of the Arthur’s Pass highway. The main ski basin is under the face of Mount Temple, with a rope tow running up to Temple Col. A few keen skiers have attempted to ski off the summit of Mount Temple, but this is extreme terrain and you really need to know what you’re doing before going there. On the other (eastern) side of Temple Col, a few people also ski into the upper Mingha. The Bill’s Basin snow field is under the peak of Blimit. It is accessed by ascending on the true right of the rope tow above the accommodation lodges, and sidling north to Page Shelter. Once in the downhill basin, zig-zag onto the ridge that flanks its southern side, and cross this ridge to enter Bill’s Basin. It is possible to continue along the ridge to the SW to Mt Cassidy (1850m). Beware of cornice on this ridge and the summit of Cassidy.
Mt%2520cassidy from%2520avalanche%2520peak routemark

tba

Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates

1
From Temple Basin
Grade 0
Easy climbs from Temple Basin. Follow the Cassidy ski tow to gain the area south of Bill’s Basin.
2
Via Cons Track
Grade 0
Reached via Cons Track, which ascends on the Southwest Ridge from the Bealey River crossing on the Punchbowl Falls track. Once the bushline is reached continue ascending the ridge on loose rock. At the base of the bluffs, a rough trail sidles northwards ascending slowly under the bluffs. After 250 metres a steep scree gully is reached. Ascend this to the easier boulder slopes of the main ridge.

tba

-
Via Mt Bealey Track
Grade 0
Reached via the Mt Bealey Track (commences from Highway 73, just south of the Rough Creek bridge). A good days exercise is to ascend Avalanche Peak, then traverse Lyell Peak to Mt Bealey on their joining ridges. Descend via the Bealey Scree into Rough Creek from Low Bealey (1760m).
-
Via Rough Creek
Grade 0
Ascend Rough Creek to its headwaters, taking the true right stream fork. This leads to an ugly scree slope directly under Mt Bealey. Its true-right arm leads to the saddle between High and Low Bealey, while the true-left joins the Lyell-Bealey Ridge at a steep sided saddle. All summits are easily obtained from these points. Beware that avalanches can roll for 700m down these routes in winter.
1
Basin Route
Grade 0
From the basins to the south of the 1844m rise on the MT AICKEN ridge. A descent off the mountain is possible down Bretts Stream, but beware of huge loose rocks at its head.

To Taruahuna Pass

Access:

Bealey River to Edwards Hut

Cross the Bealey River just above its confluence with the Mingha River (do not attempt in times of flood). Then cross the Mingha River and make for the tussock flat on the far true left bank. A staked and sign-posted trail commences here. Cross the small creek, picking up the marked trail which provides a 20 minute bypass of the lower Edwards gorge. The gorge itself is negotiable at low river levels. When the track re-emerges onto the riverbed, travel upstream on the true left, climbing the bank once or twice where the going requires it. (Warning: there are now some exciting descents off the bank, get wet in lieu!)

Cross the East Edwards River above the junction with the main river, and pick up a well-defined trail opposite. This track leads easily through bush until it emerges among the large tussock flats with a clear view of Edwards Hut.

Time: From the road to the hut is 3½hrs.

Edwards Hut to Taruahuna Pass

Continue upstream of the hut on the true left bank over tussock flats to the summit of Taruahuna Pass. This route, though long, is easy and well tracked.

Time: From the hut to the pass is about 2hrs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First ascended by E Wilson and A Anderson, December 1930.

-
From Upper Edwards Valley
Grade 0

-
From East Edwards Valley
Grade 0

Alpine - 15 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

The three branches of the Hawdon River (including East Hawdon Stream and Sudden Valley Stream) give access to several low peaks.

Access:

Taruahuna Pass to Walker Pass

From the pass bear right across landslide debris and make for the foot of a grassy saddle just north of Falling Mountain. This is Tarn Col and the best route up the steep ascent is to follow the creek and spur which drops straight down from the lowest point on the col (Climbing time = about 25 minutes). Skirt the tarn and drop immediately into the bed of the creek running east of the col. Travel the creek to its junction with the East Branch of Otehake River, then turn south and travel the river-bed upstream for 20 minutes. Ascend through low scrub to Walker Pass on the true right.

Time: 2–3 hrs.

Walker Pass to Hawdon Hut

Pick up the creek draining the tarn on the pass, following it downstream through boulders and scrub. A track does traverse this creek. After about 40 minutes, the start of the bush track is staked at the bottom end of a series of rounded rock cliffs on the true left. Climb to the second marker on the low ridge, at the end of the cliffs, and about 30m back up the ridge to the cairn which indicates where the marked track enters the bush. Follow the track steeply down past Twin Falls until it emerges in Twin Falls Creek. Hawdon Hut (built in 2007) is located about 150m upstream of the Discovery Creek junction on the western side of the Hawdon River.

Time: from Walker Pass is about 1½ hours.

Hawdon Hut to Hawdon Shelter

From Hawdon Hut follow the track (true right) until just below a point where the East Branch joins the main Hawdon River. If the rivers are low, cross here, follow the open grassy flats, crossing the river twice more to the Hawdon Shelter at the road head. However if the rivers are high keep to the true right, but cross Hawdon River prior to Sudden Valley Stream.

Time: about 3½ hours to travel from Hawdon Hut to the road head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
1 p31000561 p3100045

First ascended by J Gill, J Wilson and E Brough, December 1930.

-
From Upper Edwards Valley
Grade 0

-
From Amber Col
Grade 0

-
From Hawdon Hut
Grade 0
Climbed via Sudden Valley Stream by ascending the long ridge behind Hawdon Hut. Reaching the 1794m point, follow the Northwest Spur for 800m, climbing over several very exposed gendarmes to reach the long scree slope into the head of Sudden Valley. From here both peaks may be reached via the scree/snow gully between them. Allow 110% of all daylight hours if you intend returning to the Hawdon Valley.
-
From Sudden Valley Stream
Grade 0

-
Via Mt Wilson
Grade 0

First ascended by E Wilson and A Anderson, December 1930.

-
From Upper Edwards Valley
Grade 0

-
From Hawdon Hut
Grade 0
Climbed via Sudden Valley Stream by ascending the long ridge behind Hawdon Hut. Reaching the 1794m point, follow the Northwest Spur for 800m, climbing over several very exposed gendarmes to reach the long scree slope into the head of Sudden Valley. From here both peaks may be reached via the scree/snow gully between them. Allow 110% of all daylight hours if you intend returning to the Hawdon Valley.
-
From Sudden Valley Stream
Grade 0

-
South East Ridge
Grade 0

The highest point on the ridge between the Edwards and Waimakariri valleys, best climbed as part of a Polar Range traverse between the Edwards River and Sudden Valley Stream.

-
From Lower Edwards Valley
Grade 0

-
From Sudden Valley Biv
Grade 0

-
Mt Wilson-Mt Scott-The Dome Traverse
Grade 0

-
From Lower the Waimakariri River
Grade 0
Approached via Douglas Stream or Red Beech Stream near the Cora Lynn siding on the Midland Railway (northern side of the Waimakariri River). Both of these approaches are very difÞcult in terms of waterfall, bluff and thick vegetation obstacles below the treeline. Once out of the jungle on Douglas Stream a very steep rock amphitheatre is encountered. A steep scree on the true-left, adjacent the bush, gives access to the steep Southeast Ridge of THE DOME. Alternatively sidle across under THE DOME to the gully above the waterfalls and ascend its West Ridge. In winter this area is avalanche prone. (Grade. 2-) The head of Red Beech Stream leads to easy scree slides that access the main ridgelines of THE DOME. (Grade. 1+) Attempt these routes as ascents only! (i.e. Don’t come down them!)

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South East Spur
Grade 0

-
From Sudden Valley Biv
Grade 0

Showing all routes 1 route total 1430 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

peak adjacent to Locke Stream Hut on the Taramakau River

Access: from Locke Stream Hut on the upper Taramakau River

Attribution: Stewart Robertson

-
Mt Wilkinson traverse
Grade 0
From Locke Stream Hut, follow up Locke Stream, then Wilkinson Creek. At the junction with the first tributary coming in on the true left (at approx 1000m asl UPDATED Feb 2017) - choose the easiest way up loose and steep but well vegetated terrain to the main ridge just South of the summit (as indicated on the attached map) or to the NE ridge. Descent down the long bushy ridge to the Taramakau River is preferable to retracing the upward route. (The initial scrub barrier however is memorable.). UPDATE Feb 2017 - Decent down from the NE ridge is straightforward but requires care in the steep tussocks & gullies - takes about 1 hour from the summit to the junction at 1000m asl and avoids the scrub & bush work. Updated by Daryll Thomson after ascent in Feb 2017

Showing all routes 51 routes total

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Alpine - 46 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Trad - 4 routes - avg. grade 15 0 - 16
Ski - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 1

The Taramakau Valley gives access to several peaks at the North Western end of Arthur's Pass National Park

Attribution: Srewart Robertson

Showing all routes 1 route total 1786 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Mount Koeti sits between the Taramakau Valley and the headwaters of the Poulter River

Access: best climbed from the Townsend Hut

Attribution: Stewart Robertson

-
Koeti from the Taramakau Valley
Grade 0
Townsend Hut is at around 1170 m above the Taramakau River.--best to count gullies as you walk up the valley. The start of the track up from the river is well marked. From the hut the main ridge is easly gained and followed along to the peak.
Alpine - 45 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Trad - 4 routes - avg. grade 15 0 - 16
Ski - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 1

The track leaves from a car-park beside SH 73, just north of Arthur’s Pass summit.

Access: This relatively easy graded track follows up a deep alpine valley on the northern side of Mt Rolleston. It climbs over an old glacial moraine, then follows the contour through subalpine scrub and tussock to the Otira River foot-bridge, continue upstream on the true right to approach the Otira Slide.

Alpine - 12 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Mt%20philistine rolleston%20glacier routemark

tba

Attribution: Photos: Graeme Kates

H
Warnocks Bluff
Grade 0
Climbed from the Otira Valley. Where the foot-bridge crosses the Otira River (about halfway up the valley) follow a vague track that crosses the vegetated moraine wall high on the true left. It then zigzags up the scree slide that leads to the base of the bluffs separating Warnocks Knob from Philistine’s East Ridge. Connecting ramps and gullies, find a path through the bluffs, giving access to the easier slopes above. In winter these bluffs are extremely dangerous when covered in loose snow or ice. An alternative route through the bluffs follows a stepped creek found further to the north, though this has similar winter problems. Above the bluffs continue following the ridge, staying true left of the east ridge buttress, then climbing snow slopes to join the saddle adjacent the Rolleston Glacier. The loose main ridge is easily climbed from here.
Alpine - 9 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Mt philistine routes revisedMt%252520lancelot from%252520southeast routemark 0

Difficult direct face routes or ice gully climbs are present from the Upper Otira Valley by way of the Philistine Bluffs. The most popular of these is the Philistine Ramp, which follows an avalanche chute to the southwest corner of the Rolleston Glacier. Most other routes top out under the East Ridge buttress or the Rolleston Glacier icefall. From the névé of the Rolleston Glacier, routes can also be chosen that follow steep snow slopes or loose rock ribs to join the Philistine-Rolleston ridge. Use Warnock’s Bluff Route or the Philistine Ramp Route (to the left) for descent.

Attribution: Photo: Graeme Kates

A
Philistine Ramp
Grade 0
Only in conditon late spring early summer due to build up of avalanche debris. Follwow obvious avalanche chute towards SW corner of Rolleston Gl. Some seasons the headwall can be vertical ice. An alternative rock route climbs through the gullies and slabs on the true right of the ravine.
-
Zero Gully
Grade 0
Ice only. 3rd avalanche gut upstream from the bridge.
B
Waterfall Route
Grade 0
Rock or Ice. 2nd avalanche gully above the bridge
C
Grade 2+
Grade 0
Rock or Ice. Starts on slope betwwen the first two avalanche gullies above bridge.
D
Grade 3+
Grade 0
Rock only. Start directly under a 60deg crack system that runs into the wall on to East Ridge of Philistine. Climb vertically to the left of the crack for 25m on poor pro to intersect parallel 60deg crack, avoiding moss & water. Continue climbing crack untila small terrace is reached. Break left onto a broad, less steep facemoving upwards to a gut theat tops out onto screes under the East Ridge.
E
The Bone Collector
Grade 4.75
(Rock or ice). Follow faint buttress line diagonally right through mixed ground for 5 pitches, traverse left at a short wall and up a short couloir to climb steep ice covered slabs and then head diagonnally right over exposed mixed ground to a short 4m wall ( extremely loose rock), climb delicately over this to reach steep snow at first and then onto the main snowfield below Mt Philistine. Return via route H
F
Right Ramp
Grade 0
Ice Only. Climb Scree from bridge towards the massive boulder at its head. The route climbs the 45deg RH ramp for 50m, then up steep buttress rock to meet a sweeping RH couloir. After 40m this leads into a less steep gully for a further 150m climbing parallel to a wall on the true R. The head breaks out onto the avalanche slopes underneath the East Ridge of Philistine.
G
Diagonal Gully
Grade 0
Ice Only. From bridge follow normal Warnock’s Bluff route, however stay in large scree gully. The obvious gully that runs across to the left as you look up is met at the head of the scree. 2 ½ easy pitches gain a small saddle followed by a traverse into a steeper snow field. The gully line is picked up, more steeply to join the broad ridge above.
-
Double Blind Route
Grade 0

-
From Rolleston River Track
Grade 0
Climbable via the giant gully that rises steeply for 1100 metres from the Rolleston River track (1.5km upstream of the railway bridge). This gut can be threatened by rock or ice fall in almost any season, and is invariably a very steep ice/loose scree climb for the final 200 metres to the col between Mt Philstine and its northwest summit (1780m). Warnocks Knob should be used as the preferred descent route.
-
From Head of Rolleston River
Grade 0
From the head of the Rolleston River, climb via a steep, narrow couloir. This leaves the river via initial scree (K33 885121) and proceeds into a narrow rock gut for 200m before opening out to onto another scree slope. Keep the adjacent rock on the true left. Towards the top ascend diagonal rock gullies to join the west ridge on to the summit. Post winter route when avalanche risk is low.
Alpine - 24 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ski - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 1
Trad - 1 route - avg. grade 15 0 - 16
Ap001 0Crow%2520glacier%2520icefall routemark 1 0

waimak/otira

Attribution: Photo; Graeme Kates

Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ski - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 1
Ap023Ap016

Low Peak

Attribution: Colin Monteath, Hedgehog House Graham Kates

1
From Crow Glacier
Grade 0
From the northeastern reaches of the Crow neve. It may be ascended on either its East or West Ridges. The crux in this climb is the glacial ascent from the Crow Valley. Beware of hidden crevasses.
RR
Rome Ridge
Grade 0

GR
Goldney Ridge
Grade 0
Begins at the top of Arthur’s Pass (920m). Enter the Dobson Nature Walk opposite the memorial, taking the right-hand branch towards the Otira Valley. Where the track nears the scree chutes, bash through the scrub and follow the chutes through the bluffs to the wide open ridge above. The ridge suddenly narrows prior the first massive buttress. Sidle for about 150 metres onto the Bealey River ßank then ascend the steep scree to regain the ridge. Easy travel takes you to the summit of the second buttress. The third can be reached or bypassed on the Otira Valley side, and can involve some steep rock pitches (beware of large cornices in winter). A craggy ridge leads to the head of the Otira Slide icefield. See (route 6.3) for a description beyond here. The Goldney Ridge route is seldom climbed in its entirety as climbers prefer the less time consuming Otira Slide route.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ap001

The Crow Face rises from the East Crow Glacier to the Low Peak of Mt Rolleston. Most of the routes on the face utilise narrow couloirs, aretes and shelves, and conditions on each vary greatly depending on the season. During winter cornices form on the Rome Ridge over the East Crow, with loose snow avalanches causing some concern.

Attribution: Graham Kates

1
Left Rib
Grade 0
320m Can have a difficult start due to bergschrunds and lack of snow ramps. Move left up the ramp to a large gully (sometimes snow filled), then gain the rocky arete joining the South West Ridge of the Low Peak.
-
Central-left
Grade 2.75
Sustained neve ice up to join central direct 100m from the top
2
Central Direct
Grade 0
400m Commences in the same place as Left Rib route, with all the same difficulties. Follow the obvious gully most of the way to the summit; a split near the top allows two different finishes. Rockfall can be a hazard, as is rotten rock top and bottom
3
Right Couloir
Grade 0
250m A large bergschrund may cause a desperate move at the bottom on a somewhat smooth slab. Venture up the rib into gully that turns to a narrow steep couloir at the top. Follow Rome Ridge to its summit. Some avalanche danger!
4
Right Gully
Grade 0
320m The line is in an obvious runnel with a difficult slab start (dependent on the height of the snow ramp). There can be loose rock in the top half of gully; snow or ice fill certainly assists. Join Rome Ridge to the summit.
OS
Otira Slide
Grade 0
3 The Otira Slide route to MT ROLLESTON (2275m) is the climbers preferred ascent route to join the Goldney Ridge, and is certainly the most used and quickest descent route. From the Otira Valley car-park follow the walking trail towards the head of the valley. After the foot-bridge the trail is less defined, and the entire area is avalanche prone in winter. It takes about 90 min to reach the base of the Otira Slide icefield. (It is unwise to ascend the slide in darkness because of the high avalanche and rockfall risk in this area. Arrive there at first light if anything!) Climb the iceÞeld on the true-right, aiming for the wide couloir at its head that joins the Goldney Ridge. Climb the ridge rock, or drop onto the head of the Goldney Glacier and regain the ridge. Move away from the ridge crest, instead opting to climb the steep shallow gully that leads directly to Low Peak (2212m). If in doubt aim for the large solitary orange rock jutting out of the face, Low Peak is directly behind it. (Grade. 1+) An alternative route from the Slide, is to climb directly onto the face between Low and Middle Peaks. An obvious steep gully (Hidden Couloir) joins the ridge between these summits. It is avalanche prone, and contains loose rock. It must be frozen! (Grade. 2-) Once Low Peak is gained and if the Crow neve is not too crevassed, head for the col past Middle Peak, gaining the ridge to High Peak from there. Otherwise climb over Middle Peak. Note : The Otira Slide may be descended in winter on downhill/telemark skis. You must be an extremely competent skier, and have good avalanche assessment skills.
A
Bealy Face
Grade 0
The head of the Bealey River Valley provides a hand-full of diverse/adverse routes onto Low Peak (2212m). All routes are accessed from the upper basin. Gain the Bealey Scree by climbing the tussock slopes true left of the first obvious ravine. Follow a small creek then a fault scarp that traverses under the Goldney Ridge buttress. Sidle out over scree or very steep rock to the base of the climbs. The first route commences on the true right at the base of the long, loose, tortuous gully (400m) that finds its way to the Gap on the Rome Ridge (route 6.1). The arete on its true left is also climbable (beware of avalanches). Further to the true left several routes pick their respective ways up buttressed rock faces for about 300m before intersecting the Goldney Glacier. From here, a multitude of routes may be selected which follow snow or rock ramps to Low Peak (the Goldney Ridge is also easily gained). The easiest route on the face (Chockstone Route) starts underneath a prominent spur joining the Goldney Ridge to the far true left. A narrow gully containing the jammed boulder is climbed, followed by a series of easy scree/snow ramps to join the Goldney Ridge where it merges with Low Peak.
B
From the Head of the Bealey River
Grade 0
Approaches from the head of the Bealey River are reached by climbing the slope on the true left of the Bealey River adjacent the start of the black ravine (follow a creek initially). Climb towards, and traverse the fault scarp that sidles west under the Goldney Ridge buttress to meet the huge scree/snow slope. Ascend the couloir that joins the Goldney Ridge between Low Peak and the first ridge buttress (prominent low point). The climb to Low Peak (2212m) is relatively easy going on rock or snow from the ridge.
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OTIRA SLIDE, Ski Touring.
Grade 0
Map K33 After good snowfalls it is possible to skin up the Otira Valley (from the foot bridge at least) to the base of the Otira Slide, the large snow slope that descends from the summit of Low Peak on Mount Rolleston. 90 minutes to 2 hours travel time to the base of the slide. It is important to assess the avalanche potential of this route. Most climbers will be ascending on foot for the steeper section above here. On descent, stay away from the Goldney Ridge (true right) side as the cornice here can be dangerous.
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From Upper Waimakariri Col
Grade 0
climbed from the head of the valley near Waimakariri Col. Snow slopes lead up towards the neve of a glacier running north of MT ROLLESTON. Climb the obvious gully joining the Philistine Ridge, then 70m above the neve take the narrow, steep couloir (Sampson's) on the true left. This joins the Southwest Ridge after a climb of 120m. Traverse the short distance to High Peak. The peak may also be approached more directly by the broken rock buttresses of the Philistine Ridge.
1
From Crow Valley
Grade 0
The usual route, after leaving the valley floor, is to climb towards the icefall and then travel beside it on the west until Crow neve is reached. The two obvious gullies to the true right of the icefall are the best options, but beware of avalanches after fresh snowfall. In summer large pinnacles of ice crash down the bluffs on the true left. The ridge may be cut off by deep crevasses late in the season. From there the three peaks of Mt Rolleston are accessible a) LOW PEAK (2212m) can be reached easily from the northeastern reaches of the Crow neve. The crux in this climb is the glacial ascent from the Crow Valley. Beware of hidden crevasses
Ap001 1

Otira Crow

Attribution: Graham Kates

1
From Crow Glacier
Grade 0
from the northeastern reaches of the Crow neve. It may be ascended on either its East or West Ridges. The crux in this climb is the glacial ascent from the Crow Valley. Beware of hidden crevasses.
Ap023 1

Routes on the 900-metre Otira Face to the Middle Peak of Mt Rolleston are for experienced parties only. More often than not the rock can be quite rotten in zones as determined by the obvious synclined strata!

Visibility plays a major role in a successful and safe climb of the Otira Face, and if poor could lead to major epics on the Middle Peak routes.

Routes on the Otira face of the High Peak are listed separately.

 

Attribution: Colin Monteath, Hedgehog House

A
Middle Direct
Grade 0
The arete on the left-hand side of the central gut is the most direct line to Middle Peak. It is a loose, long haul. It has claimed many lives in its short history of ascents. Route finding towards the top of this face tends to be quite messy; nearly everybody manages to concoct an original finish.
B
Middle Rib
Grade 0

A
High Peak from Crow Gl
Grade 0
Ascended from the Crow neve by a myriad of rock gullies or aretes joining the West Ridge of High Peak. Most of these routes tend to be single pitch climbs dependant on snow ramp heights, and the presence of bergschrunds. Protection is sparse in summer conditions, however the rock grades are very low.
B
High Peak Direct from Crow Gl
Grade 0
120m A rock (summer) or ice (winter) route exists on the Southern Face directly below the summit of High Peak (2275m). Access is difficult due to the very large bergschrund at the base of the face. Ascent is made up a shallow diagonal gully directly to the peak. Protection is minimal in summer.
C
High Peak From Crow Glacier
Grade 0
Ascended easily using the Eastern Ridge from the col adjacent Middle Peak. Approach the col from directly below on the Crow neve to avoid at least some major crevasse zones. The first buttress on this ridge is turned on it’s southern flank.
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Philistine-Rolleston Traverse
Grade 0
Climbed by traversing the ridge from Mt Philistine (1967m), a very long climb generally on loose rock, with many obstacles. Most gendarmes can be turned on narrow ledges (catwalks). Beware of cornices in winter to late spring. Be prepared for a forced bivy should your start route to either summit be a face climb. Some ropework may be required.
Alpine - 4 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Trad - 1 route - avg. grade 15 0 - 16
Ap023 2

For experienced parties, a diversity of routes may be taken up the 900m Otira Face of Mt Rolleston. Some of the routes are very difficult, and more often than not, the rock can be quite rotten in zones as determined by the obvious synclined strata!

Routes on the Otira Face of the Middle Peak are listed separately.

 

Attribution: Colin Monteath, Hedgehog House

A
Otira Couloir
Grade 0
This route leads up the dangerous central gut between High and Middle Peaks. It is prone to continuous avalanche activity in winter, and rockfall in summer. Climbers generally choose to join the Philistine Ridge near the upper snow basin.
B
Left Flank
Grade 0
From the snow/scree Field at the base of the Central Direct route keep moving left until the nose of a rocky arete is reached. Climb on generally exposed rock, with poor protection, to join the Philistine Ridge.
C
Central Direct
Grade 0
This route, on the right-hand side of the central gut is by far the most popular (not only because it tops out on High Peak). Most of the climb takes place on the prominent buttress that appears to lead directly to High Peak. The buttress is reached by climbing from the Otira Valley onto the permanent snow-field at its base, via either the loose green bluffs and ramps (adjacent the central gully), or better still the narrow couloir that joins the Philistine-Rolleston Ridge (a route in its own right). Routes on the buttress are many and varied. The rock is surprisingly solid, and the ensuing 500 metres is a climb to be relished. In contrast the next 200 metres is upon the stacked blocks and broken buttresses of the Philistine-Rolleston Ridge. The final 50 metres is good solid rock and is easily climbed to High Peak.
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Westweg
Grade 15
150m The Central Direct ridge can be gained on its West side by a 150m long banana shaped corner rising above the snow field. The final 60 meters offers the best climbing on either face of the corner, offering either good rock and poor protection or loose rock and good protection.
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Headstone Gully
Grade 2.25
250m The route follows the gully to the right of the access for Central Direct (Mt Rolleston -Otira Face). Climb to the top of the scree slope at the base of the climb and join the gully from there. The climbing on the lower half of the route is on reasonably solid rock and is relatively straightforward. The rock gets looser as you approach the prominent overhang/ roof at about 2/3 height, there is possibilities for good anchor on right hand side of overhang (small cams helpful e.g. .5 camalot and smaller). Climb around overhang via weakness on wall at right side (crux), this section is tricky but is protectable and leads to easier ground. A couple of short scree tiers lead to the final gully system. Climb these gullies to the ridge top. The top gullies are insecure and offer limited chance for protection. Climb to summit via Philistine-Rolleston Ridge
Image02

The slabs on the true right of the upper Otira River.

Attribution: Graham Kates

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Fly My Pretties
Grade 16
48m Traverse along the ramp then straight up. Crux is near the top. Good gear placements but requires a bit of a clean. Good anchors at the top. Scramble up and belay on the obvious ledge or you'll run out of rope!
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Sonam
Grade 15, 15
1. 45m Belay on the higher ledge and head up and right. Straight up through the scrappy section then into a prominant crack that takes good gear.
2. 25m Start near middle of wall and head slightly left. Poor pro.
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Kea Kindergarten
Grade 14
25m Right trending weakness to the right of the 2nd pitch of 'Sonam'. Well featured and good placements for large wires/small hexes and mid range SLCDs.
Alpine - 9 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+

Goat Pass to Highway 73 via Deception River

Access: From Goat Pass, a marked track through the scrub descends to the upper Deception River. The route now takes the form of scrambles, rock-hopping down the riverbed, and adjacent bush; very rarely is it on a marked trail. The Upper Deception Hut is reached in approximately one hour, on the true right. Continue in or beside the riverbed for a further 2 1/2 hours until it opens out to a large flat, on the true left just below Gorge Creek. Past the flat, the river narrows into a gorge. A footbridge spans the river at this point. Maintain the true left side of the riverbed, descending on down the lower gorge for two more hours to the open flat where the Otira River meets the Deception River. Cross the Deception to the true right before the junction. The Morrison Footbridge across the Otira River is just north of the confluence. Note: The Mingha-Deception route is all but impossible in times of heavy rain, or rapid snow melt!

Alpine - 9 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Ap028

A very imposing pinnacle of rock. On many occasions it still manages to pierce the notorious West Coast cloud (something of a redeeming quality). It is by far the best climb east of Arthur’s Pass.

Attribution: Graham Kates. Colin Montieth, Hedgehoghouse.com

1
West Ridge
Grade 0
Approached from Good Luck Creek via the Deception River, alternatively via the denesly wooded spur that leaves the Deception River at K33 974151, on the true left of the stream that drains the Franklin-Russell escarpment. This ridge is notoriously long and loose, and has multiple gendarmes. Once committed to this route, there are no escape routes, however travel tends to be fast over large sections of it. Considered a mid spring climb when ice clings to it.
2
From Deception River
Grade 0

3
South West Ridge from Goat Pass Hut
Grade 0
Ascended from opposite Goat Pass Hut utilising the obvious deep gully and notch. A generally straightforward ascent joins the col above Lake Anna, then climbs the steep South Ridge to the summit.
4
South West Ridge and South Ridge
Grade 0
This route can be climbed in winter to late spring by reaching the head of the Deception River from Goat Pass Hut. Scree or snow slopes head through the lower bluff to reach the steep snowfield (avalanche danger!) below the 1975m South West Ridge rocks. In a normal season three 150m couloirs gain the South West Ridge. Alternatively, gain the ridge lower down by utilising the obvious deep gully and notch directly opposite Goat Pass Hut. Continue along the ridge to gain the col separating Lakes Anna and Sally. Ascend the steep South Ridge to the summit. Return via the Deception River route (2).
5
Mt Oates-Mt Franklin Ridge
Grade 0
This ridge is a very long journey from Goat Pass and would be better tackled from a camp near Lake Mavis. Gain the ridge along the Main Range above the lake, following its initially broad back to the second knoll (1864m). From here the ridge narrows, taking a steep approach to the summit of the next buttress (1876m). The ridge turns west over the exposed slabs above Lake Sally and the deep gut of the upper Deception, climbing steeply over broken ground to join the South West Ridge. From here descend to the col above Lake Anna then climb the steep South Ridge to the summit. Be well prepared for a forced bivvy as it is a very long day’s outing!

There are a few routes from the Lake Sally basin.

Access: Lake Sally is at best difficult to approach and a high camp is strongly recommended under the knoll near its outflow. Access to the lake is gained by the ridge and loose bush covered slopes south of the stream which drains it, from the Otehake River West Branch. Alternatively ascend the slopes on the north side of the same stream, sidling around the base of the East Ridge to reach the lake. Eastern descents from Mt Franklin tend to be very steep, natural anchors allowing abseils directly onto the snowfield are available. Under winter conditions the routes can all be fraught by overhanging cornices.

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Way Down Sally
Grade 4.75

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East Ridge
Grade 0

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Upper East Snowfield Couloirs
Grade 0

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North East Ridge
Grade 0

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Showing all routes 1 route total 1792 m

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Poulter-Minchin Area

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South Ridge
Grade 0