Fetched from ClimbNZ on Aug 25th, 2017

Showing all routes 302 routes total

Alpine - 295 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+
Ice - 6 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2 3 - 4 5+
Trad - 1 route - avg. grade 16 0 - 16

Showing all routes 2 routes total

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n/a

Showing all routes 1 route total 2110 m

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TBA

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From the Hunter Valley
Grade 1.75

Showing all routes 1 route total 2177 m

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Bealey Range

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From the Hunter Valley
Grade 2

Showing all routes 17 routes total

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Alpine - 17 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

The Humboldt Mountains lie to the west of the Forbes Mountains, starting at the Greenstone River, and extending north to join the Main Divide at Nereus, at the head of the North Branch of the Routeburn River. This section includes the peaks along the Main Divide, from Nereus to the start of the Barrier Range.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2293 m

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1 p9240157

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The South Ridge.
Grade 1
From the bivvy at D40 297 042 in North Branch of Routeburn, which is at the head of a small avalanche path about 100m above the creek on the true left, climb the prominent ridge and rock face to gain access to the snow field above. A small couloir leading left from the head of the snow field gives access to the south ridge of Somnus.
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The Somnus Couloir
Grade 2
From the bivvy at E40 303 021 climb a prominent steep couloir to gain access to the snowfields above which the south ridge can be gained.
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The North Ridge
Grade 0
The North Col of the Routeburn gives access over Nereus on the Rock Burn side at the lowest point. Snow, rock and a long couloir lead to the summit rocks.
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North East Buttress
Grade 4
700m The route follows the left hand of two prominent ribs that form the buttress before tending right up easier ground to finish directly on the summit. 700m of climbing mainly on solid rock with sections at up to grade 15/16, mainly on the lower buttress, before the angle eases towards the top.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2343 m

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The first recorded ascent was by W.J.P Hodgkins and E. Bryant in 1894.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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East Face.
Grade 0
From Kinloch, ascend to the bush line before crossing the northeast slope of Bold Peak to gain the notch in the ridge between Bold Peak and Bonpland. Easy snow slopes on the east side lead to a short scramble of good rock before final snow slopes.
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The West Ridge.
Grade 1
From Kay Creek climb high on the west ridge then sidle around on to the north face and scramble to the summit..
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East Face-North Ridge.
Grade 1
Follow the Glacier Burn track until snow fields under East Face are reached. Climb the prominent couloir leading to the north ridge of Bonpland.
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The East Face Direct
Grade 2
Climb the smaller couloir gaining access to the south ridge or go directly up East Face from Bryant Glacier/ snowfield.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2148 m

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A traverse between Momus and Somnus is possible, generally along the long broken ridge.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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South East Face
Grade 2
From the Routeburn Track follow the track to Sugarloaf Pass. Above the bushline sidle left on snow grass ledges into the head of a small basin. Climb steepish gully (begins E40 341 019) gaining access to the basin above Bridal Veil Falls. From here follow snowfields to the couloir, which gives access to the summit. From the Routeburn Track follow the true left of Bridal Veil Creek to bush edge. Follow the left branch to the head of the valley gaining tussock ledges above bluffs at about 1,400m, giving access to the basin above Bridal Veil Falls. This route is a good descent route, dropping into the eastern side at times.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1940 m

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North West Ridge.
Grade 0
Scramble round the head of Lake Unknown to reach the ridge joining Nox and Minos and follow this to the summit. Access to this peak is difficult. Alternatively, from Theatre Flat in Rockburn.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2002 m

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North West Ridge.
Grade 0
Accessible from Lake Unknown or Park Pass and the Park Glacier or Theatre Flat.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1965 m

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TBA

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North West Ridge
Grade 0
From Park Pass up shingle north of the pass then via the Park Glacier.
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SW Ridge
Grade 0
Follow the obvious route up steep rock slabs (and snow slopes, depending on the season).

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1995 m

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First ascent by Jack Holloway 1947.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North Ridge. Grade
Grade 2
Park Glacier provides access to the long summit ridge which is traversed by passing the gendarme on either the Beans Burn side or the Lake Unknown side. Alternatively, from the head of Lake Unknown, ascend through basins to about 1,920m then back along ridge. Ridge is quite narrow in places.
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South Ridge.
Grade 1
Accessible from Park Pass and the Park Glacier or Lake Unknown.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2204 m

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Cow Saddle
Grade 0
From Cow Saddle, either direct on rock or by circling the peak on the snow. An alternate route is from Tantalus.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2229 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 0
The low peak can be climbed from Park Glacier to a small peak and from there along the sharp arête to the west. The high peak is reached from the Niobe side and ends in a rock pinnacle. From Beans Burn, leave river at E40 340 153 up into valley and up East Face.

Showing all routes 4 routes total

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The Serpentine Range runs between the Hollyford valley and the Route Burn North Branch.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1978 m

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The highest point on the range.

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South West Ridge
Grade 1
From the Valley of the Trolls at the head of Lake Harris, down from Harris Saddle on the Routeburn Track, head up the top of the valley and climb the scree slope to the right of the peak till you reach the top of the saddle. From the top of the saddle follow the easy 'C' Shaped ridge to the Erebus summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1912 m

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Above Lake Harris.

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SW Ridge
Grade 1
From flats in Valley of Trolls, start climbing once past the worst of the boulder covered flank. Gain the ridge. Once past the flat shoulder area, avoid any problems on the steeper upper ridge by using the north side as needed.
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NE Ridge
Grade 1
Ridge can be reached from two directions: 1. From Valley of Trolls, continue to the saddle area between Erebus and Xenicus and cut onto the ridge where desired. 2. From above Routeburn Falls huts, climb to spur and continue to top of next basin north to the ridge line. Climb up the ridge avoiding a few buttresses by sidling on the south side.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1848 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 1
From Harris Saddle.

Showing all routes 3 routes total

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The Ailsa Mountains run between the Hollyford and Greenstone valleys and Fraser Creek/Caples River.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 1815 m

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Emily Peak can be reached from either the Routeburn Flats, Lake Mackenzie, or the head of Fraser Creek.

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North East Ridge
Grade 0
From the Lake McKenzie Campsite head up the "Split Rock Track" to the end of the Lake. Follow one of the many river beds up the right of the valley and head towards Emily Pass. At Emily Pass head up right again until you reach the wall of Emily Peak's West Ridge. From this point a proper rock climb ensues. The technical difficulty is low, but the exposure can be as much as 200m+ and isn't for the inexperienced or faint hearted without rope. The rock can be loose and rock fall is heard frequently on the surrounding peaks.
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East Ridge
Grade 1
From Routeburn track, follow up Emily Creek and then climb to Emily Pass. From the pass follow east ridge to summit.
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Wuthering Heights (West Face)
Grade 16
Goes to the left of the right skyline. It is about grade 16. But on very compact rock with few anchors.

Showing all routes 10 routes total

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Alpine - 10 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

The section of the Main Divide between (roughly) O’Leary Saddle and Fohn Saddle, or the Dart River in the East and the Forgotten and upper Joe Rivers in the West. The Barrier Range lies to the west and the north of the Forbes Mountains, and forms part of the Main Divide. The Cosmos Peaks and Bride Peaks are on ridges running south of the Main Divide.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

Showing all routes 1 route total 1872 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Normal Routes
Grade 0
Climb from the north side of Fohn Saddle or from the north.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1872 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 0
As for Brenda Peak, then from Brenda Peak.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1800 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 0
As for Brenda Peak, then Corinna Peak, then from Corinna Peak.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2161 m

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Nn 5%20irvine%2c%20mallory opt

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo, Nick Neynens.

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Via Merkl Glacier
Grade 0
Reach the Merkl Glacier from Fohn Saddle via Brenda Peak and ascend to the top neve up the icefall and from there up the summit ridge, or from Mallory.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2148 m

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Nn 5%20irvine%2c%20mallory opt 0

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo, Nick Neynens.

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Standard Routes
Grade 0
From Irvine Peak via snow or rock, or from Albert Peak and Betty Peak in the east.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2353 m

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Called David in original articles and early sketch maps.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Abruzzi Glacier
Grade 0
From Abruzzi Glacier (reached as for Johansen), at the only spot where there are not icefalls or cliffs cross until overlooking the Margaret Glacier and then climb across steep ice slopes over the shoulder and the next ice field to the larger neve feeding the Joe Glacier on the south side of Gates. A rock couloir then leads to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2300 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 0
From the saddle below Albert cross steep ice slopes and ascend them to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2009 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Chancellor
Grade 0
From Chancellor descend a rock couloir leading straight down on the Joe River side to a snow saddle from where easy snow slopes lead to the summit. An alternative is to cross under Chancellor from Frobisher and ascend from the south.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2009 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From O’Leary Pass
Grade 0
From O’Leary Pass via Frobisher.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1931 m

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Named Franklin in earlier accounts.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From O’Leary Pass.
Grade 0

Showing all routes 3 routes total

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Showing all routes 1 route total 1910 m

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Drake Valley.
Grade 0
Climbed from Drake Valley.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2040 m

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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East Face
Grade 0
East Face, from Drake Valley

Showing all routes 1 route total 2093 m

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Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Traverse ridge from Sombre.
Grade 0
Traverse ridge from Sombre.
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Showing all routes 11 routes total

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Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+

The Haast range of mountains is a wild extension of Mount Aspiring running out west towards the sea and becoming more isolated the further from Colin Todd Hut you get. The peaks are described in order starting nearest Aspiring. Stargazer, Skyscraper, Moonraker and Mainroyal are romantic names commemorating the sails of the tall ships and given to the peaks of the Haast Range by Gerhard Mueller in 1885.

Access: Mount Aspiring and the Bonar Glacier is usually reached from Pearl Flat. Via the West Matukituki http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/west-matukituki-track/ Bevan Col accesses Colin Todd Hut, which can be used as a base for the North Buttress, North West Ridge, South West Ridge and the Haast Range. ‡ Note. In winter or early spring it is recommended to use the French Ridge access routes to get to the Bonar Glacier. After the spring avalanche cycle, or when the Quarterdeck becomes impassable, use the Bevan Col route.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2353 m

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Stargazer is the highest of the Haast Range peaks. Until December 17, 1935, when it was climbed by Harry Stevenson, Doug Dick, Stewart Ombler, Scott Gilkison, and Jim Dawson the peak reigned as the elusive virgin of the Otago mountains.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The East Face.
Grade 2.25
Climb to the top of Shipowner Ridge and cross the snow saddle leading to the Therma Névé. Traverse on moderately steep snow beneath the rocky eastern faces of Rolling Pin, Mainroyal and Skyscraper to reach the heavily crevassed slopes leading up to the ridge near the centre of the Skyscraper-Stargazer massif. The schrunds under this face may prove difficult, as they appear to have become more pronounced in recent years. The ridge is gained a few metres south of the summit and easy snow leads to the top. The face may also be reached by crossing the Skyscraper-Mainroyal Col from the west. A schrund on the east side of the col is sometimes awkward. In good snow conditions the climb should take about six hours from the hut to the summit.
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The West Ridge.
Grade 3
From Colin Todd Hut cross the Iso and Dipso Glaciers at about the same height as the hut and follow a steep snow lead up to a level section on the West Ridge, about 300 metres below the summit. The steep rock ridge is then followed, with the more difficult moves occurring on its lower sections. Near the top, the ridge peters out and it may be necessary to move out on to the face to the south to gain the summit ridge, six to seven hours out from the hut.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2249 m

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The intriguing name of this mountain, so incongruous in comparison with the nautical names of the other Haast Range peaks, is apparently derived from its resemblance to the culinary instrument when seen from the east. It was first climbed by Allan Evans and Geoff Milne on January 3, 1948.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The Skyline Traverse
Grade 2
This is a classic traverse taking in mind-expanding views of the Tasman Sea and if reversed, Mt Aspiring. Continue to the top of Shipowner Ridge from Colin Todd Hut and climb the snow and rock arête on to the south end of the summit ridge. The long level ridge is predominantly snow and is very exposed on the Therma Glacier side. Return to the hut via the Iso Glacier. The round trip takes about five hours.
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The West Face.
Grade 2
Traverse across the Iso Glacier at about the same height as the hut until underneath the summit, which is reached by easy snow and rock. From the hut to the summit takes about two hours.
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West Face rock routes
Grade 0
Situated on the West Face of Rolling Pin beneath the 35m abseil descent from the main summit, as seen from below, not the abseil at the end of the ridge. There are five routes, ranging from grades 15 to 22, all on natural gear, all single pitches, on clean rock. (They were cairned at the time of their first ascents). • 2 cracks to the left of the obvious crack/corner. • The crack/corner itself. • 2 routes to the right, one of which is a crack the other a broken corner starting underneath an overlap. Crag best approached from the hut, along the Iso Glacier (the one footing the West Face of Rolling Pin), well worth the walk.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2266 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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The North Ridge.
Grade 1
Traverse north across the Iso and Dipso Glaciers at about the same level as the hut, until the col between Skyscraper and Mainroyal is reached. A few minutes easy climbing up the rocky ridge leads to the summit, about 2.5 hours from the Colin Todd Hut.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2347 m

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The West Face
Grade 3
From the hut traverse the Iso and Dipso Glaciers at about the same level as the Colin Todd Hut, until the north end of the Skyscraper massif is reached. The route is up a poorly defined buttress on the face, about 200m west of the Skyscraper-Mainroyal Col, slightly east of a short snow tongue. The buttress leads to the summit ridge a short distance south of the peak, which is then reached along easy rock and snow. The face takes two to three hours and is a sustained rock climb. From the hut to the summit requires about six hours.
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The East Face.
Grade 2.25
Follow route to the summit ridge of Stargazer and then traverse south to the high col between the two peaks. A steep and rotten, but not difficult rock wall leads to the summit, about six hours out from Colin Todd Hut.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2126 m

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The first ascent of Spike was made by Peter Brook, Colin Todd and Kemp Fowler on January 11, 1949.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The South West Face.
Grade 2
Follow route as far as the bench below Spike. The peak is climbed by a snow face on the south west side, followed by 80m of unpleasantly loose rock.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2054 m

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The name is more inspiring than the peak, which was first climbed by Peter Brook, Colin Todd and Kemp Fowler on January 11, 1949.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The North West Ridge.
Grade 2
Traverse the Iso and Dipso Glaciers to the west ridge of Stargazer, which is crossed immediately below two prominent rock steps. The North Face of this ridge is descended by a series of snow gullies and the ridge then followed down about 400m on slopes of snow tussock, until a narrow shelf of snow tussock leads around into the cirque below the North West Face of Stargazer. As the ledge is followed north it becomes broad and sloping and an unpleasant slabby gut has to be crossed before the cirque is reached. From the cirque a snow spur leads out to a broad, gently sloping bench that runs below Spike and continues to the North West ridge of Moonraker. The North West Ridge consists of a short snow climb and 20m of easy rock. The peak is a long way from Colin Todd Hut and requires a bivvy, perhaps on the north side of the West Ridge of Stargazer.
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North Ridge.
Grade 0

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Showing all routes 2 routes total

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The Snowdrift Range lies to the north of the Forbes Mountains, and forms part of the Main Divide.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2220 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Routes
Grade 0
Reach the col between Mt Alpha and The Snowman from Whitbourn Saddle via the Snow Dome and east Snowball Glacier and ascend ridge. An alternative is to climb direct from the glacier.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2055 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 0
Travel over snowfields on the Joe River side of Ferrier Peak, Bernard Peak and Mt Ian from O’Leary Pass. When the névé between Ian, Victoria and Tiber is reached, ice slopes are seen leading to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total

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Showing all routes 1 route total 2020 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From the south-east
Grade 0
Via snowslopes from the south-east. Grade 1 from the head of Mueller Valley at Lake Dispute.
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Showing all routes 14 routes total

Alpine - 14 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

Muddy Creek to Shelter Rock Hut Time: 6 - 8 hr, 19 km

Access: Useful links http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/queenstown-wakatipu/rees-dart-track/ Earnslaw Burn http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/queenstown-wakatipu/earnslaw-burn-track/ Kea Basin http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/queenstown-wakatipu/kea-basin-track/

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2610 m

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Earnslaw massif opt 3

Forbes Mountains First climbed by J.A. Sim, V.J. Leader, K. Grinling, Dec 1930.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo, Lloyd Homer GNS Science.

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North Face.
Grade 1
From Shepherds Pass descend to the Frances Glacier and cross this to the West Ridge. Sidle round to the North Face, climbing this to the nick above the gendarme from where the northwest ridge is followed to the summit. The Frances Glacier can also be easily reached from the Bedford Valley which provides a pleasant alternative from Wright Col to the sidle round the side of Leary. The North Face has been ascended all the way to the summit and a party has climbed right over the gendarme on the northwest ridge.
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East Ridge
Grade 2
From Shepherds Pass cross scree slopes to reach the Grant Glacier on the South Hunter face of the mountain. This can be ascended to reach the East Ridge which is followed to just before the middle of the three gendarmes. A horizontal traverse on to the North Face, which is ascended direct to the summit, avoids the buttress further up the ridge. From the West Hunter a variety of routes connect with those mentioned above. There are many variations possible in the above routes.
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South Ridge
Grade 2
Climb from Shepherds Pass. The first step is passed by a ledge on the Frances side and a chimney. The second step is passed on the South Hunter side and the third step, to reach the top of the buttress, on the Frances side again using the shelf running right across the mountain. The ridge is then followed just on the Frances side until another step presents the most technical climbing. Above this the ridge eases to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2184 m

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Forbes Range

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 1
This unnamed peak has been reached from the West Hunter by following up a small glacial basin and crossing snowfields.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2218 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 1
This unnamed peak has been reached from the West Hunter by following up a small glacial basin and crossing snowfields.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2585 m

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Jc moira head opt 0

Forbes Mountains

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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West Ridge.
Grade 1
From the West Hunter and Jura Glacier. Access to the Jura glacier is via a rough gully beginning at E40 473 159 that climbs left to the glacier.
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North East Ridge.
Grade 1
From the West Hunter, traverse on the right hand side of point 2035 and onto the South East Ridge of Moira. From the ridge, cross the Grant Glacier and gain the col between Moira Peak and Mt Head, and then ascend ridge to summit. A traverse of Mt Head and Moira Peak from the West Hunter bivvy is a great trip to do.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2494 m

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Jc moira head opt

First ascent H.F. Wright, 1914.

Attribution: Allan & John Cocks

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West Ridge. Grade
Grade 1
From the North or West Hunter climb to the col between Mt Head and Moira Peak via the South East Ridge and the Grant Glacier (refer to West Ridge of Head Pk). Then follow the ridge to the summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2282 m

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Jc moira head opt 1

(Previously referred to as South Peak) First ascent West Peak Russell and George Edwards, S.D & L.W. Divers, C.L. Buddicom, G McQueen, December 1932.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

NF
North Face
Grade 2
From the North Hunter ascend to the snow slope below the North East Face of Ellie and traverse to the col to the south of the peak. The West Face gives access to shingly rock terraces on the Dart side which in turn lead to a couloir on the North Face which can be followed to the top.
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Traverse
Grade 2
It is possible to traverse the Osonzac Twins but it is necessary to drop on to the Dart side.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2225 m

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(Previously referred to as North Peak) First ascent East Peak E.O. Dawson, A.R. Craigie, W.S. Gilkison Jan. 1938.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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East Face.
Grade 1
The south spur of Clarke can be reached from the North Hunter or via the Clarke Slip from the Rees and is followed until the glacier under Clarke can be crossed to Pyramid Col. The level traverse continues under the south-east face until snow slopes and rocks can be climbed to the summit.
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Traverse
Grade 2
It is possible to traverse the Osonzac Twins but it is necessary to drop on to the Dart side.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2271 m

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First climbed by H F Wright in 1914.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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South West Ridge
Grade 1
Gain the South East Ridge on Moira Peak from either the North or West Hunter (see Route 11), then traverse under Moira Peak to the col between Moira Peak and Ellie Peak. Continue up the ridge.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1963 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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South West Face.
Grade 1
From Shelter Rock Hut climb via the southern slopes or snow couloir.

Showing all routes 67 routes total

Alpine - 61 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+
Ice - 6 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2 3 - 4 5+
Gns whitbourne dun a81 opt

Mt Aspiring NP

Access: Useful links- http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/queenstown-wakatipu/rees-dart-track/ Cascade Saddle http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/queenstown-wakatipu/cascade-saddle-route/ GOVERNORS’ RIDGE Access to Plunket Dome, Islington and Liverpool Governors’ Ridge is the ridge connecting Plunket Dome, Islington and Liverpool and is the edge of the upper Dart Névé. A fantastic alpine wander can be had by travelling up Cascade Saddle along Governors’ Ridge and down one of the ridges above Rough Creek. Link to West Matuktuki access- http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/south-island/aspiring/snowdrift-range/islington-dome/plunket-dome-governers-ridge

Attribution: The Whitbourn Glacier from the south. Photo. Lloyd Homer, GNS Science.

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75
Earnslaw massif opt 0Earnslaw1

No mountain view could be more majestic and tantalising than that of the Earnslaw massif on a clear day, as one rounds the Bennett’s Bluff on the Queenstown to Glenorchy Road. The Earnslaw massif features the twin peaks of Mount Earnslaw, the second and third highest peaks of Otago. Mt Earnslaw consists of two major peaks, the East Peak and the West Peak. The massif can be approached from either the Rees Valley via Kea Basin, or from the Dart, via the Bedford Valley. The East Peak was first climbed by guide Harry Birley alone on 16 March 1890. The first traverse from the East Peak to the West Peak was by Scott Gilkison and A. Jackson on the 11th January 1933.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photos, Brain Wilkins & Lloyd Homer GNS Science.

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From Wright Col.
Grade 1
Scramble up through lower bluffs and slightly right up through scree slopes until ledge sloping steeply up to the left or a gully straight above give access through the main bluffs to the final easy slopes. Many variations are possible on the bluffs.
-
East Face.
Grade 1
Traverse on to the Birley Glacier from Wright Col and then ascend directly to the main ridge.
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South East Ridge.
Grade 2
From Wright Col traverse round the Birley Glacier and snowfields to the south-east ridge. Alternatively, from the bivvy at E40 488 108 on the ridge to Esquilant Bivvy, gain the snowfields on the glacier under the East Peak and drop down to the col north of Black Peak. An alternative route is to gain the South East Ridge higher up above a prominent rocky buttress sticking out of the glacier. From Lennox Pass or the route from the Kea Basin track to Lennox Pass, gain ledges under and east of Peak 2026 at 1650m, then sidle right to the ridge leading to Black Peak. Traverse Black Peak and descend to the col. Traverse snow slopes on eastern side of ridge crest until regaining ridge. The route over Black Peak requires caution because of very loose rock. Alternatively, sidle round on the snowfields on the south side of Black Peak to gain the col and the south-east ridge
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West Ridge (traverse from the West Peak).
Grade 2
From West Peak, travel either on snow or rock along the ridge joining the peaks, passing the gendarme on the north face. An alternative is to use the steep rotten gully leading to the col between the peaks (see the Leader Route ), which is accessible from the scree slopes leading round from Wright Col.
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South Face
Grade 2
From Wright Col traverse round the Glacier and snowfields to gain the South Face.
Alpine - 6 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75
Earnslaw massif opt 2Earnslaw1 0

The West Peak was first climbed by H F Wright and J Robertson on 6 February 1914.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photos, Brain Wilkins & Lloyd Homer GNS Science.

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Wright Robertson Route.
Grade 2
Gain access to a scree shelf by scrambling though first rocks on the north-east shoulder of the East Peak and then follow the scree shelf round until directly under West Peak. Here a chimney leads up 500m directly to the summit. The foot of the chimney can be reached from the standard route to Pluto Col from Wright Col.
-
Leader Route.
Grade 2
From Wright Col traverse shelf as in Route 6 but when under the col in the ridge between the East and West Peaks ascend a steep crack of rotten rock to the col. After a short deviation on to the steep South Face, ascend the ridge to the summit.
-
North Ridge.
Grade 2
From Pluto Col climb up the north ridge until, at about 150m below the peak, a traverse across a small couloir to a subsidiary ridge overlooking the main couloir on West Peak can be made. The left side of this ridge is climbed back to the main ridge which is followed to the final slope via a narrow ice ridge. A variation on this route is to climb the first mentioned big couloir to the ridge seen from traverse around to Pluto Col.
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West Face – Southwest Ridge.
Grade 2
From Spaniard Valley climb up to and over scree until hard under the point at which Seven Sisters Ridge joins the ridge from Turret Head. Here a couloir of loose rock leads to a notch in the main ridge. The first detour necessary is made on the Spaniard Valley side but further up a detour is forced on the Earnslaw Glacier side on steep ice. Some earlier attempts at this route via Turret Head failed, one of these at the point where a detour on to the Earnslaw Glacier became necessary due to conditions, but otherwise this route is feasible.
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South Face – East Ridge.
Grade 2
From Earnslaw Burn climb to the col between Black Peak and the East Peak before traversing across the Earnslaw Glacier and ascending diagonally through icefalls to reach the ridge between the East and West Peaks to the west of the lowest point. Then follow the ridge, detouring as necessary on the glacier side.
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South Face.
Grade 2
Scramble up through lower bluffs and slightly right up through scree slopes until ledges sloping steeply up to the left give access through the main bluffs to the final easy slopes. Start on scrub covered ledges on the true right of the Earnslaw Burn, then ascend the right hand ice rib.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2350 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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West Face.
Grade 1
From Dans Paddock in the Dart Valley climb above the bush line to gain a long couloir leading to the main ridge, then go left to the summit.
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North East Ridge.
Grade 1
From the head of the Earnslaw Burn gain a small grassy ledge above the waterfall (120m). Then follow round the corner to gain the northeast ridge to the summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2480 m

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Earnslaw pluto 05 jour opt

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo Brian Wilkins.

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North West Face
Grade 2
From the Bedford Valley a prominent scree fan leads to a couloir. A variety of routes up rock and snow ledges leading round towards the North West Face can be followed, the final ascent of the tower being up a couloir on the North West Face. Variations on the ledges up the tower have been followed. From Pluto Col climb scree until the foot of a vertical step in the ridge is reached at a point overlooking Spaniard Valley. Here a large ledge tends round on to the western face to gain the couloir on the North West Face. Follow beautiful big red stepping-stones from here to the summit.
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South Buttress.
Grade 0
From Pluto Col. This is the steep left-hand ridge viewed in profile from the bivvy. The route includes 2 distinct overhanging steps, both of which are turned on the climber’s right. It is loose and steep. Descent is via abseil back down the route.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2313 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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East Ridge
Grade 1
From the West Hunter and Jura Glacier. Access to the Jura glacier is via a rough gully beginning at E40 473 159 that climbs left to the glacier.
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West Ridge.
Grade 1
From the bottom of Cattle Flat climb up Rough Creek and follow tussock ledges above the bush line. From Daleys Flat in the Dart or Whatta Creek ascend to well above the bush line and sidle north on ledges until the west ridge leads to the summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2285 m

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First climbed by L.M. Earle in 1909 from the Rees.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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North East Ridge.
Grade 1
Climbing from Shelter Rock Hut follow the long couloir on the east face and complete the climb up the North East Ridge.
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South Ridge
Grade 1
From the Rees climb the Clarke Slip to gain the Clarke spur (or reach it from the north branch of Hunter Creek). Either ascend the spur to the summit, or detour on to the snow slopes to the west or cross the snow slopes to Pyramid Col and complete the climb by that ridge. Many variations are possible. There is a small bivvy rock on the ridge out of the Clarke Slip at E40 509 150 but it is not much good in rough weather.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2252 m

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The Cosmos Peaks exist in a Pounamu Special Permit Area.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From the Dart
Grade 0
From the Dart, climb Slip Stream until the ledges west of and above Lake Mystery can be traversed to a snowfield from which a steep couloir leads to the summit. A rocky ridge from the same snowfield leads to the higher West Peak. Good camp spots at E40 376 158.
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From Beans Burn
Grade 0
Access to the peaks can be gained from the true left of the Beans Burn at the first open flat, from where a creek may be followed to the snowline and the jagged peaks, or cross Beans Burn at E40 349 136 and climb to bushline. Direct access can be gained from Sandy Flat in the Dart. Follow Beans Burn to point E40 349 136, cross the Beans Burn and follow deer tracks to the top of the bushline. Head up a prominent gully which gains access to the south end of the snowfields from where the summits can be gained.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2135 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 0
From the Dredge Burn or the Dart Valley, continue climbing instead of descending to the Margaret Glacier.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2180 m

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Called Watkins in original articles and early sketch maps.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Stefansson Peak
Grade 1
From Stefansson Peak or via the Derivation neve, the latter being reached from Joe River or Desperation Pass. Best access from Dart via Glacier Col, Forgotten River via Possibility Col, or Dart via Seal Col route. All better than Joe by any route.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2218 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Stefansson Peak
Grade 1
From Stefansson Peak or via the Derivation neve, the latter being reached from Joe River or Desperation Pass. Best access from Dart via Glacier Col, Forgotten River via Possibility Col, or Dart via Seal Col route. All better than Joe by any route.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2043 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Routes
Grade 2
Climb from Derivation Neve or Margaret Glacier via Gino Peak or from Desperation Pass.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2070 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Routes
Grade 0
This is a straightforward climb from the Abruzzi Glacier which can be reached either from O’Leary Pass by crossing under Nansen Glacier, by traversing Frobisher and Chancellor or from the Dart via the route to Des- peration Pass. It can also be reached via a couloir from Seal Col.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2480 m

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Formerly known as Ferguson, Wahine was first climbed by Gordon Edwards, Ernie Smith and Doug Knowles on March 12, 1933.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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The West Ridge.
Grade 2
From Pakeha Col (see Governers Ridge via the Cascade Saddle track) the West Ridge of Wahine is a short, easy rock climb, taking three to four hours from Cascade Saddle.
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The East Ridge.
Grade 2
Access Liverpool by route 3.1 and traverse the straightforward rock and snow of the Main Divide to Wahine, one hour from Liverpool.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2535 m

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Maori optCopy%20%283%29%20of%20upperdart opt

First climbed on March 5, 1935, by Russell and Gordon Edwards, Ernie Smith, and Doug Knowles, Maori repulsed further advances for 25 years, until Les and Doug Brough, Lindsay Bruce, and Alex Gourlay finally succeeded from the Snow-White Glacier after a series of attempts totalling 55 days spread over seven years. The route of the original ascent from the Dart was not repeated until 1966.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo John Marcussen.

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From the Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
From the Whitbourn Saddle via the Snow White and ‘Maori’ glaciers, reach the South West Ridge and follow it to the top.
1
The East Ridge.
Grade 3
From Cascade Saddle follow route 3.1 before veering left under the South Face of Wahine to reach Pakeha Col. The route on Maori zig-zags up a series of rotten rock ledges on the Dart Face to regain the ridge above the main gendarme. Above this the rock improves somewhat but is still poor, with some delicate towers just below the summit. The climb would take about five hours from Cascade Saddle and one and a half hours from Pakeha Col.
2
The South Face.
Grade 3
Follow route towards Pakeha Col and the East Ridge then drop down to underneath the face. The route parallels the East Ridge through a rock band on mixed ground, and up steep snow slopes to the summit. This is a good mixed route and of better quality than the East Ridge.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2482 m

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Copy%20%282%29%20of%20upperdart opt

Maiti-iti was first climbed by Lindsay Bruce, Alex Gourlay, and Les and Doug Brough from the Snow-White Glacier in January, 1958. The first ascent from the Dart was by Laurie Kennedy and Bruce Robertson, who traversed from Maori in February, 1966.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo JHG Johns.

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Standard Route
Grade 0
A direct snow climb from Whitbourn Saddle via Snow White and Maori glaciers.
-
The East Ridge.
Grade 2
From the summit of Maori descend the shattered rock of the West Face to the col on the Main Divide. The East Ridge of Maiti-iti is a climb of about 100 metres, consisting of a lower section of loose rock and a more difficult and exposed upper section, before a short snow ridge leads to the summit, about l.5 hours from Maori. The col between Maori and Maiti-iti could probably be reached from the Dart Névé.
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The South Face.
Grade 2
The steep snow face of Maiti-iti is reached by climbing straightforward snow slopes beneath the ice-cliffs of the Park Glacier.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2460 m

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Copy%20of%20upperdart opt

Maruiwi was formerly known as Moriori. The first ascent was by Jim Dawson, Bob Craigie, Phil Cook, and Scott Gilkison on January 7, 1939, from the Snow-White Glacier.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo JHG Johns.

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From Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
From Whitbourn Saddle and Snow White Glacier either climb up the glacier or a snow couloir on the north face to the North West Ridge then traverse the West Face and complete the ascent up the snow face to the south; or climb the west snow face to the rock ridge on the Divide and follow this to the summit.
1
Via the Park Glacier.
Grade 2
It appears possible to reach the extreme northern end of the Park Glacier by a steep snow face with an upper rock band, at the south-west end of the shelf of the hanging glacier beneath Maiti-iti and Maori. From the Park Glacier the summit could he reached by easy snow routes on either the North East or South Ridges.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2595 m

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Maoriri was first climbed in December 1937, by George Lockwood, Arch Wiren, and Jock Sim by traversing below the ridge from Edward, but there is no record of a direct ascent from the Dart.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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The East Face.
Grade 0
The direct route is up snow slopes from Whitbourn Saddle.
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The South Ridge.
Grade 2
From Edward a traverse along or below the ridge to Maoriri appears straightforward.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2385 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
From Whitbourn Saddle climb over the Snow Dome and ascend the South Ridge, the easier North Ridge, or the West Ridge.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2620 m

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Rf humboldt%20tower%2c%20mar opt 1

The attractive peak of Edward can be seen from the Raspberry Flat car park in all its glory, over the top of Cascade Saddle. Like a lot of the peaks in this guide that aren’t named Aspiring, Mt Edward doesn’t see many ascents. The first ascent was made in 1914 by Bernard Head, Jack Clarke and Colin Ferrier, who climbed from the head of the Whitbourn. The first ascent from the Dart was by Russell Gordon, George Edwards and Doug Knowles, on March 7, 1935.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo Rob Frost.

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From the Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
From the Whitbourn Saddle, traverse or sidle under Maoriri. From below the Whitbourn Glacier climb a shingle slide to and then traverse the Geikie Glacier until able to descend a snow couloir from the saddle below Troas towards the Whitbourn. Climb through crevasses to reach an ice ridge about 60m below the summit. A variation is to cross the Whitbourn shoulder of Troas.
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Via the Marshall Glacier.
Grade 2
Cross the Dart Glacier below the icefall to the scree slopes south of the East Ridge. These give access to the Marshall Glacier which is followed up to the base of a prominent rock face on the south side of the East Ridge about 200m below the peak. From this point the ridge is followed, with two chimneys and a short snow ridge before the summit. Alternatively the snow of the South Ridge can be reached by continuing to the top of the Marshall Glacier. The climb would take six to seven hours from Cascade Saddle.
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The East Ridge.
Grade 2
Unfortunately no details of the route are available. The ridge can be gained by climbing the avalanche gully just south of the icefall and traversing a broad ledge (subject to avalanche early in the season) to reach the foot of the East Ridge immediately above the icefall. The lower section of the ridge appears to be the best rock and the most interesting climbing.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2247 m

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Rf humboldt%20tower%2c%20mar opt 0

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo Rob Frost.

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From The East
Grade 0
Reached either by a traverse under Mt Maoriri and Mt Edward from Whitbourn Saddle
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Direct
Grade 0
direct from the Whitbourn River below the Whitbourn Glacier (refer to Troas).

Showing all routes 1 route total 2243 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & Joh Cocks

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From the Whitbourn Glacier
Grade 0
From the large shingle slip near the terminal face of the Whitbourn Glacier climb to the spur overlooking the Whitbourn, then cross the Geikie Glacier and ascend the leading ridge.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2247 m

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Rf humboldt%20tower%2c%20mar opt

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo Rob Frost

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Standard Routes
Grade 0
To gain the ridge between the Dart Valley and Whitbourn Valley refer to Moir 2005 p42. This ridge should be followed to the summit. The peak can also be climbed from Whitbourn Flats.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2249 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
Climb from Whitbourn Saddle via the Snow Dome and east Snowball Glacier.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2255 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
imb from Whitbourn Saddle via the Snow Dome and east Snowball Glacier.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2205 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Whitbourn Saddle
Grade 0
Climb as for Gamma and Delta. Alternatively climb from the saddle between The Snowman and Mt Alpha

Showing all routes 1 route total 2280 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Routes
Grade 0
Climb either from Mt Beta along the ridge or by crossing the col between Mt Alpha and The Snowman and ascending from the middle Snowball Glacier. In each case, reach Mt Beta or the col via the Whitbourn Saddle, the Snow Dome and the east Snowball Glacier.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2517 m

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Snowdrift Range

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From the Whitbourn Glacier
Grade 0
From the head of the Whitbourn Glacier cross the Snowball Glacier via the col between Mt Alpha and The Snowman until a steep snow face gives access to the north summit ridge.
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From Key Dome
Grade 0
From Key Dome follow round the base of Amundsen and ascend from the Ferrier Glacier or Boys Col.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2217 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Boys Col
Grade 0
From Key Dome directly or from Mt Tiber

Showing all routes 1 route total 1900 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Whitbourn flats
Grade 0
When entering the Whitbourn flats from the gorge, locate the first stream on the west side about 50 metres up the flats. It’s rocky gulley leads up until near the top of the ridge, just under bluffs, a good deer trail leads south through the bluffs to reach the ridge. There are good campsites below the Dome.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2288 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Boys Col
Grade 0
From Boys Col cross the west Snowball Glacier and ascend the north face, or traverse Mt Amundsen from Boys Col or Key Dome. The west Snowball Glacier can also be reached from O’Leary Pass across snowfields on the Joe River side of Ferrier, Bernard and Ian. This gives an ice or rock route to the top.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2502 m

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Snowdrift Range

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Boys Col
Grade 0
From Boys Col follow around the base of Tiber on the north-west side. A snow couloir leads to a rocky ridge from where a traverse down and across a further couloir to the Main Divide allows a crossing of a col to the north-east face. The top is reached up a final couloir.
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Alternative Route
Grade 0
Alternatively, the long grassy slopes referred to under Ferrier Peak give access to snow slopes below Ferrier and Bernard Peaks which can be crossed to the snowfields above the Blue Duck Glacier. This in turn leads to a steep ice slope which can be followed back to the main ridge and thence to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2457 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Cattle Flat
Grade 0
From the bottom end of Cattle Flat a trail leads to bush line and through scrub to the true left of the stream draining O’Leary Pass from where long grassy slopes provide gentle access to the snow. The long grassy slopes referred to under Ferrier Peak lead to snowfields to the east across the top of Curzon Glacier. From this point, rocks are ascended to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2337 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Cattle Flat
Grade 0
From the bottom end of Cattle Flat a trail leads to bush line and through scrub to the true left of the stream draining O’Leary Pass from where long grassy slopes provide gentle access to the snow. Several rock gendarmes are then negotiated to gain the rock ridge leading to snow slopes at the foot of the rock peak.

Showing all routes 8 routes total

Ice - 6 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2 3 - 4 5+
Alpine - 2 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

Routeburn Valley.

Ice - 6 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2 3 - 4 5+
Alpine - 2 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Routeburn%20iceA1 a2RoutebiceTub 0Tub1 0Tub2 0

Waterfall ice climbing

Attribution: Material extracted from "REMARKABLES ICE & MIXED FESTIVAL ICE & MIXED GUIDE," 2012. Edited and posted with permission.

A1 a2 0Routebice 0

For the ice routes at Area A: Walk approximately 3 hours from the main carpark, past the Routeburn Flats Hut and up the North Branch of the Routeburn. On the True Right of the North Branch of the river, opposite the climbs, there is a great dry rock bivy. From the bivy to the base of the routes its approximately 20 minutes walk. These routes can be done in a day trip from Queenstown and are on the west buttress of Mt. Somnus, to the right hand side of the main gully.

A1
Mid Winter Christmas
Grade 0
WI3+, M5. 9 Pitches. Start up the ice smear right of the main gully, before traversing back left at the end of pitch 3. Continue up the obvious corner system and ice lines to the top of the buttress.
A2
Insominous
Grade 0
WI3+, M4. 3 Pitches. Direct start to MWC following the obvious gully from the base.
A3
Un-named
Grade 3
30m Single pitch ice route on the right hand side of the main gulley. There are plenty of further oppurtunities for more short ice routes to be climbed on either side of the gulley.
Ice - 5 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2 3 - 4 5+
TubTub1Tub2

Walk approximately 1 hour from the carpark. Follow a dry creek bed through open ground. After 1 hour of bush bashing you arrive to another hour of steep tussock climbing that leads you into a snow gully. In the gully if conditions are right there will be many 20 - 200m high pillars. When this area was first visited conditions were quite warm and only four routes were formed. There were the remains of many more sitting on the gully floor. The base of the routes is approximately 3 hours from the car. For the first ascent of Tubular conditions were very thin and it was graded WI5R. It is likely the climb will be a grade easier if you find it in fat conditions. Descent from all multi-pitch routes is by walking along the ridge at the top of the climbs and decending down the main snow gully via a short WI2 down climb.

B1
Left Hand Start Tubular
Grade 0
This variation start looks around WI4 and will take the route to a full 200m long. Not formed when the area was first visited.
B2
Tubular
Grade 5, 4, 5
1. 70m 3 Pitches: Pitch 1: 70m WI4 to belay in alcove.
2. 30m WI4 to belay at the base of vertical pillar.
3. 60m On the first ascent this was a completely detached free standing pillar. The crux section was around 10cm thick. This should fatten nicely in better conditions.
B3
Mr Konbucha LHS
Grade 4
WI4+. Two short pitches up steep ice.
B4
Mr Konbucha RHS
Grade 4
Start on RHS of ice flow two short pitches.
B5
Jono’s Leftovers
Grade 3
30m Short 30m pitch up steep ice.

Showing all routes 38 routes total

Alpine - 38 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: The mountains in the lower valley can sometimes peek out from behind the rain shadow of the greater alps and provide good scrambling when a mountain fix is desired. The lower valley climbs, apart from the winter waterfall routes, are mostly grade 1–2 requiring little more than an ice axe and crampons. Beware of loose rock. Access to head of Rob Roy Stream and climbing routes. Above the bushline continue on the true left bank of Rob Roy Stream through light scrub and tussock, keeping 100m above the stream. After crossing a washed-out stream bed follow around terraces until a small silty flat is reached. From here find a convenient place to descend to the avalanche-threatened Rob Roy Glacier. During the summer the avalanche hazard comes from the glaciers above and in the winter from large gullies dropping from Homestead Peak. A broad spur to the left of the large gully dropping from Homestead Peak is then climbed which ends up merging with the snowfield underneath the Homestead Peak and Rob Roy Col. Link for Rob Roy Valley http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/rob-roy-track/

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2283 m

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Glengyle is an impressive sight from Aspiring Hut, although it is in fact little more than a bump on the South Ridge of Rob Roy. The crags and towers of Glengyle are sometimes mistakenly called the Cathedral Peaks—however, that name was originally applied to all peaks between Bevan and Glengyle on the northeast side of the West Matukituki.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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The South Ridge.
Grade 2
Climb to the ridge by way of a clearing through the bush, across the river and slightly downstream from Wilson’s Camp. From the crest of the ridge cross into a basin on the west side of the South Ridge of Rob Roy and traverse across this into a second basin to reach the foot of a mixed snow and rock ridge leading to the summit. The climb requires about 10 hours from Cascade Hut to the summit and a bivvy high on the slopes opposite Wilson’s Camp would be desirable.
-
The West Face.
Grade 2
There appears to be no problem in forcing a route up through steep bush into the snow tussock basins below the peak, from where there are a variety of interesting looking rock routes to the summit.
-
West Face. Following Dave.
Grade 3
Access from terminal moraine under Rob Roy.
-
South Face Central Gully
Grade 3.75

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2020 m

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Named in recognition of the hospitality of the Aspinall Family of Mt Aspiring Station. Homestead Peak was first climbed by Paul Powell, Owen Wye and Geoff Harrow in December 1952. They climbed the South East Ridge, partly as an exercise in keeping warm, after a stormy night had put paid to their attempt on the unclimbed East Ridge of Rob Roy. Nine years later circumstances were similar when Peter Strang, John McKinnon, Jim Milne and Graham Bishop, also with eyes on the still-virgin ridge of Rob Roy, briefly escaped from a saturated tent to snatch a new traverse of Homestead Peak by the North West and South West Ridges. In 1968 Brian Cleugh and Jack Coker after admirable persistence finally climbed the long sawtoothed South West Ridge leading to the South Peak.

Access: Access to head of Rob Roy Stream and climbing routes. Above the bushline continue on the true left bank of Rob Roy Stream through light scrub and tussock, keeping 100m above the stream. After crossing a washed-out stream bed follow around terraces until a small silty flat is reached. From here find a convenient place to descend to the avalanche-threatened Rob Roy Glacier. During the summer the avalanche hazard comes from the glaciers above and in the winter from large gullies dropping from Homestead Peak. A broad spur to the left of the large gully dropping from Homestead Peak is then climbed which ends up merging with the snowfield underneath the Homestead Peak and Rob Roy Col.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From the East Matukituki.
Grade 1
Cross the West Matukituki at Cameron Flat to start up the hill immediately behind the old homestead of Mount Aspiring Station, on the south side of Homestead Creek. The South East Ridge is gained above the head of the creek and is a straightforward rock climb the summit. From Cameron Flat to the summit would require from seven to eight hours.
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From Rob Roy Stream.
Grade 2
From Rob Roy Stream use access route A15 to access the gentle snowfields in the head of Rob Roy Stream. These give easy access to the North West and South West Ridges, which are both very straightforward rock climbs on rather loose rock. Each ridge takes about one hour from the head of the snowfield.

Showing all routes 16 routes total 2644 m

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Alpine - 16 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+

Rob Roy is a mountain pushed up by the tectonic plates and in the process given multiple birth defects. Ridges and faces don’t come together with the symmetry of Aspiring and climbers shy away from the hunch-backed summit. Despite appearances however, the mountain has a magnetism and a wonderful array of varied and interesting routes. The first ascent, from the West Matukituki and the Rob Roy Glacier, was on March 2, 1935, when the mountain was overwhelmed by the sheer weight of numbers of a party consisting of Ernie Smith, Monty McClymont, Cedric Benzoni, Bob Fullerton, George Palmer, Don Divers, Russell Edwards, George Edwards, and Gordon Edwards,

Access: Access to head of Rob Roy Stream and climbing routes. Above the bushline continue on the true left bank of Rob Roy Stream through light scrub and tussock, keeping 100m above the stream. After crossing a washed-out stream bed follow around terraces until a small silty flat is reached. From here find a convenient place to descend to the avalanche-threatened Rob Roy Glacier. During the summer the avalanche hazard comes from the glaciers above and in the winter from large gullies dropping from Homestead Peak. A broad spur to the left of the large gully dropping from Homestead Peak is then climbed which ends up merging with the snowfield underneath the Homestead Peak and Rob Roy Col.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The East Ridge
Grade 3
Although tantalising glimpses of the East Ridge can be seen from the West Matukituki it was not until January 10, 1963, that the ridge was climbed, when Tony Bowden and Graham Bishop traversed the mountain from a bivvy at the head of Rob Roy Stream. The ridge rises from the Homestead-Rob Roy Col in two prominent steps. The lower one forms a triangular face with the snow shelf beneath giving access to the Avalanche Glacier. The route traverses this shelf to a point from which the north edge of the triangular face can be gained. This edge provides enjoyable climbing on steep rock, but it could be avoided by traversing the ledge further towards the Avalanche Glacier, where a snow route allows a return to the ridge above the first step. There is a variation on the left side of the first rock step up an ill defined gully involving grade 15 rockclimbing on sound rock. The second step, although loose and exposed, is straightforward, as is the rest of the mixed rock and snow ridge to the Low Peak, about five hours from the col. The traverse to the High Peak commences with a gentle descent on an easy snow arête until the ridge is blocked by a large gendarme. This is turned on the west side and beyond it 100-200 metres of exposed but technically straightforward rock lead to the snow cone of the high peak, two to three hours from the low peak. Slings and pitons would be the protection of choice for the traverse. The traverse from the foot of the East Ridge to Aspiring Hut via the High Peak and route 8 has been completed in 13 hours.
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The South Ridge and Rob Roy Glacier.
Grade 1
Across the Matukituki and slightly downstream from Wilson’s Camp there is a large avalanche gully which in winters of high snow fall deposits debris in the valley floor. This gully gives fast and unimpeded travel to above the bush line. There is a small waterfall at the bottom but this is easily negotiated on the true left on a deer trail. Most parties attempting this route have bivvied at 1600 metres, before crossing the ridge to gain the broad crevassed snowfields of the Rob Roy Glacier. These provide a staightforward route, on a rising traverse, to the high peak. ➠ Note. There may be a large schrund below the summit. The climb can take 10–11 hours from the valley floor and is a comfortable weekend trip from the Raspberry Flat carpark. The round trip from carpark to carpark taking in the High Peak-Low Peak traverse and down the Rob Roy stream has been accomplished during one long hot summers day.
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The North West Ridge.
Grade 2
Follow route to the col on the rib running down from the West Face. The snowfields to the north are easily traversed, climbing steadily towards a prominent col on the North West Ridge. Above the latter col the ridge is steep and slabby but consists of sound rock. The first two or three pitches are the most difficult and involve two awkward steps, both of which are turned over the Maud Francis Glacier. Above them the angle eases and the remainder of the ridge is straightforward rock and snow, leading to the summit ridge about 150m south of the high peak. The climb takes about five hours from the col on the rib from the West Face to the summit.
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The North Face.
Grade 2.25
The expanse of the North Face dominates the view of Rob Roy from French Ridge. Although tantalisingly close across the slot of Gloomy Gorge, the only practicable access is via the Maud Francis Glacier. Follow route 14 across the upper slopes of the Maud Francis Glacier and continue until more or less beneath the High Peak. Access to the face is by a prominent snow chute, above which snow and ice leads are followed to reach the summit ridge about 50 metres north of the High Peak. The nature of the route can vary considerably depending on conditions. The first party took about two hours from the névé to the summit.
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The North Ridge.
Grade 3
The North Ridge leads to the Low Peak (2609m) which is separated by a long airy summit ridge from the High Peak (2644m). From French Ridge climb the Quarterdeck to the Bonar and then descend the Flightdeck to reach the Maud Francis Glacier. Cross the névé to gain the North Ridge where it begins to steepen towards the Low Peak and follow the crest to the summit. Time from the hut to the summit is about nine hours.
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The North East Face.
Grade 0
The North East Face above the Avalanche Glacier appears to be a straightforward snow route and can be reached either from the head of Rob Roy Stream, or from French Ridge by crossing the divide between the Maud Francis and Avalanche Glaciers at its lowest point. It has potential as a rapid escape route from Low Peak.
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Bonar Glacier-Rob Roy Stream traverse.
Grade 1
This traverse, taking in the Maud Francis and Avalanche Glaciers and Rob Roy Stream is a way of walking out from climbing in the Mt Aspiring region and avoiding the walk down the Matukituki Valley. From the Bonar descend the Flightdeck and traverse around the Maud Francis and cross the ridge between Mt Avalanche and Rob Roy near the middle. Then continue down and around the Avalanche Glacier and link up with the snow shelf which runs underneath the East Ridge of Rob Roy. Use the access route for the head of Rob Roy Stream in reverse from the Rob Roy-Homestead col. The Avalanche Glacier may be a tangle of decomposed ice near the end of the summer and require more time than advised. Usual times are: Bonar to Homestead Col, 6–8 hours and Homestead Col to carpark, 4–5 hours.
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The South West Ridge.
Grade 3
This route climbs the South West Ridge to the pyramid peak east of the low peak. Steep rock (iced or grade 14) followed by a snow arête.

Showing all routes 4 routes total

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After reaching the col there are a number of options to gain the foot of the South Face. These options have come into being because of the great glacial recession. (1) Climb most of the way up the ridge separating the Little South Face (the Little South Face is the triangular face with the East Ridge on its right hand edge) and the South Face then descend to the glacier. Be aware that the small ice cliff clinging to the face down and right of the Low peak is active and deposits debris all the way down to the lower glacier. (2) The Little South Face has a number of interesting gully lines on it which give a challenging start at about grade 4. (3) Climb the East Ridge to the top of the second step avoiding the first rock step and descend SE Corner Route.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

1
The South Face Original Line.
Grade 5
The route on the face follows the well-defined rib that falls from right to left from the summit. Two broad gullies lying to the left of this rib are swept frequently by ice avalanches from the cliffs above. Cross the schrund to the right of the foot of the rib. The foot of the rib is very steep and it is climbed on its eastern flank, where about 300 metres of fairly sustained rock climbing leads to the crest. Steep snow and ice (rock later in the summer) provide straightforward climbing for the next 300 metres. A small overhang on the rib is climbed directly, beyond which steep ice patches lead to the final snow and ice slopes beneath the summit. The initial party, with a rope of three, spent about 10 hours on the face.
2
The Zone
Grade 5
“Ok, so if Craig peels off making this move over that bulge, that piton’s gonna pull along with the stake right out of this manky snow. Which leaves Craig, Gareth and I fast accelerating to the glacier two hundred metres below. “Yeah Man you’re looking solid. Charge it!” So the dialogue went between the lads trying to access the South Face via the ridge bisecting the Little South Face and route 2. They managed not to fall off and went on to climb a route on the South Face between the original summer route and A Couple of Days, finishing as for the summer route. The lower part of the route was sustained steep ice. Overall length 9 pitches.
3
The South East Corner.
Grade 2
This route is very difficult to access due to the ‘great glacial recession’. This route has become more of a way of accessing the South Face than a climb. The South East corner is a fifty five degree, prominent snow and ice tongue leading up to the East Ridge, below and right of the low peak. The route follows the snow and ice leads, with a steeper section of about 150 metres of rock in the middle, before more snow leads out to the ridge about 100 metres below the low peak. In the winter this is all snow. This was used as the access route to the upper névé for the ascent of the South Face route. Moore’s time from the névé to the ridge was about one hour.
4
A Couple Of Days.
Grade 5
This is an all ice route climbed in late winter. A gully on the Little South Face was climbed, 10 pitches of grade 4 and then route 2 was descended into the upper névé to access the main South Face. The route on the South Face takes a series of ill defined gullies right of the summer route. After about 6 pitches there is a sixty five degree snowslope, 2 pitches. Three pitches from the summit a steep rock corner is climbed on ice with good rock protection. This leads onto a steep arête then up a gully and onto the summit snow slopes finishing just right of the summit. Sixty metre ropes were used. Three bivvies were had, one at the base of the Little South Face, another in the bergschrund at the bottom of the South Face and one on the Maud Francis Glacier.

Showing all routes 4 routes total

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The West Face was initially descended by Paul Powell and Frank Cooper in 1954, and again by Tony Bowden and Graham Bishop in 1963. The first ascent was not until 1964 when Don Morrison and Peter Child climbed it from Shovel Flat. Four variations are available on the face:

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks, Photo Geoff Wayatt/ Mountain Recreation.

1
West Face Variant
Grade 2
Climb steep snow for three pitches, followed by three moderate pitches to a gap in the South West Ridge. Then cross to the top of a hanging glacier to meet the previous route
2
From Aspiring Hut
Grade 2
From Aspiring Hut cross to the east bank of the Matukituki and from the head of the flats climb through the bush into the tussock and snow basins above. The ice cliffs of a small hanging glacier, visible from the hut, are turned on the east, before easy snow and finally slabby rock lead out to the South Ridge about one kilometre south of the High Peak.
3
From Shovel Flat.
Grade 2
Use route A5 described in the access route section to access the face from Shovel Flat. The rib to the north is crossed at an easy col (1950m) and is then followed up on snowfields on the north side. Access to the steeper upper snowfield may be complicated by a short rock step. The rib eventually merges into the face, from which point steep but easy slabs lead out to the summit ridge about one kilometre south of the High Peak. Both this and the previous route are long climbs from the valley floor and would probably be more enjoyable from a camp above the bushline.
4
West Face Variant.
Grade 2
A steep, broad gully splits the face offering eight to ten pitches of excellent snow climbing. Subject to mid-summer slab avalanches. It is a mixed climb in the late summer.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2496 m

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Tyndall was first climbed by Frank Wright and J R Simpson on February 21, 1914, from the Dart Valley. Mention was made that it had been ‘partially ascended’ previously, and indeed in 1922 Professor James Park claimed that Alexander McKay, John Buchanan and himself had climbed it in 1881, along with Mt Edward, Mt Ansted, and ‘all the high peaks to the south’ [of Hector Col]. McKay’s account on the other hand, written a few months after their expedition, makes it clear that they only went as high as ‘Red Rock’ on Tyndall, and indicates that Park’s claims to this and the other ascents were probably embellished with the passage of time.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Via Shotover Saddle.
Grade 1
Start up easy tussock slopes on the down valley side of Tyndall Stream. When approaching Shotover Saddle bear west below the patch of red rock. Traverse through a series of easy snow basins on the north side of the East Ridge into the cirque below the low peak. Steep snow slopes lead out, on to the North Ridge a few hundred metres north of the low peak and an easy slope leads on to the high peak beyond. This is a long climb and would probably take about nine hours from Cascade Hut to the summit.
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Via the Cascade Saddle Route.
Grade 1
From the top of the Cascade Saddle, Tyndall is a very easy climb by the North Ridge, taking about six hours from Aspiring Hut to the summit.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2211 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo DG Bishop.

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North West Ridge.
Grade 1
Pick a route up through the bluffs between Raspberry and Big Creeks, to gain the easy leading ridge. 200 to 300 metres below the summit a steep gut is crossed to give access to a better ridge on the south west side, which is then followed to the summit. The final 50m or so are on relatively exposed slabs. The climb to the summit takes about six hours from Raspberry Flat.
1
The South Face
Grade 1
Start up the tussock and bracken slopes directly behind Raspberry Hut. After about one hour the ridge becomes well defined and eventually leads to a col (1750m) on the Shotover-Matukituki divide. From this col follow a deer trail south for several hundred metres, until the south ridge is crossed and a prominent snowfield on the South Face is reached. The snowfield is then climbed to the summit. This route would take about six to seven hours from Raspberry Flat.
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The North East Ridge.
Grade 3.25
The North East Ridge is reached from the col at the head of Raspberry Creek and consists of a steep climb on shattered rock, with some delicate and unprotected moves, as only this type of climbing can deliver, necessary near the top.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2096 m

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The spectacular spire of Shark’s Tooth was first climbed by Bob Craigie, Phil Cook, Roland Rodda and Scott Gilkison on December 19, 1939.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo DG Bishop.

1
The South West Ridge.
Grade 2
Climb to the col on the Shotover-Matukituki divide. An easy tussock and rock ridge, with snow on its south side, leads north east from the col to the final rock pyramid, which is normally climbed by the moderately steep, rather loose slabs of the West Face or the rocks of the South Ridge. Five or six hours are required from Raspberry Flat to the summit.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2240 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo; DG Bishop, & Paul Scaife

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The East Ridge.
Grade 2
Steep tussock slopes on the south side of Niger Stream lead out to the ridge between Niger and Fog Peaks. Fog Peak may be reached, either by traversing the rock ridge to the summit, or by cutting out on to the snowfield on the South Face. This is a long climb from the road and would probably take about eight hours to the summit.
1
The North Ridge.
Grade 1
From Glenfinnan Peak the straightforward rock of the North Ridge leads to the summit ridge some 200m north-east of the summit.
2
The West Ridge.
Grade 2
The West Ridge is reached by crossing the North Ridge between Glenfinnan and Fog Peaks and traversing on suitable ledges across the steep North Face of Fog Peak until the West Ridge provides a straightforward route to the summit. To be climbed comfortably, this route would probably require a camp near Glenfinnan Peak.
3
HMH
Grade 0, 0
1. 50m The first pitch climbs 80º stepped ice, ending in an ice cave large enough to shelter four people.
2. 50m The second pitch erupts out of the cave and onto a 40-metre pillar. If the left hand side is climbed, the grade is WI3+ on 85º stepped ice. If the right side is clung to then vertical grade 5 climbing can be expected. On the first ascent the left-hand side was climbed.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1890 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Via Niger Stream
Grade 0
Glenfinnan Peak is a fine viewpoint overlooking the confluence of the two branches of the Matukituki. It is easily reached in four to five hours from the road by climbing the tussock slopes on the north-west side of Niger Stream.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2018 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Matukituki Valley
Grade 1
Niger Peak is an easy scramble from the road, either by the South East Ridge from just north of Leaping Burn or by the tussock slopes south of Niger Stream. The climb would take about four to five hours from the road to the summit.
1
Cardrona Cafe Girls
Grade 0
100m This route is on the South side of Niger Peak above the Matuktuki Station, R Ewing’s property and can be seen from the Matukituki road, on a line of bluffs overlooking the gorge of Niger Stream. It takes about three hours to reach the base of the route via a sheep track on the true right of Niger Stream. This track wends its way under a line of bluffs and comes out above the gorge. Cross the stream and head up and through scrappy bush to reach the bottom of the route. The alpine scrub getting to the bottom of the route is jungle like and time consuming. Cardrona Cafe Girls is the right hand line and is about two pitches in length. The crux is at half height and is a small vertical step. If this is wet and dripping a detour can be made out right via an interesting section of mixed frozen tussock and blobs of ice. The slopes above appear to be active avalanche zones. If there is any doubt about stability perhaps rappeling the route would be a good idea. There is good bouldering and a small beautiful chandelier in the clearing above the stream gorge.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2289 m

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Black Peak is a spectacular mountain in the lower valley

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Routes
Grade 2
There are two main ridges both of which can be seen from Wanaka, the Eastern Spur and the North Ridge. The Eastern Spur is accessed through Cattle Flat Station and is an interesting climb through bluffs and along an exposed ridge. The other route is through Matukituki Station and goes up the true right of Phoebe Creek and under a line of bluffs on a sheep trail then up the ridge. ‡ During winter Black Peak is the site of some steep multi-pitch ice climbing. See the section on waterfall ice,
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On the South East Face of Black peak are two quality routes. Underneath the summit snowfield there is a line of bluffs with a ramp running from right to left underneath them. The routes are on these bluffs. These lines can be viewed from the Mt Aspiring lookout at the Treble Cone Ski Area. This is a wild place to climb and has a feeling more akin to climbing in the greater Alps. To get to these lines you can use the routes described in the Black Peak lower valley section or a helicopter can be used for an express lift from Charlie Ewing at Cattle Flat station. South side of Black Peak There is an expansive crag of ice near the bottom of the South Face of Black Peak. It is on a line of bluffs facing east. There isn’t a lot of information on this ice as only a few ascents have been made, but it looks like the whole spectrum from mellow to mental is covered.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

1
Huge
Grade 0
200m contained in a gully and once again the steepest section is at the bottom. On the first ascent the icicles were formed up in steps with a small overhang to be surmounted. The pitches are four long ones and end at the snow-field. Both of these routes are relatively safe from avalanches. However the ramp to access them should be treated with kid gloves.
2
The Straight Jacket Fits
Grade 0
150m This route climbs out of a small alcove at the top of the line of bluffs. The first pitch is the steepest. Above this a few laid back pitches lead up a gully to the snow field.

Showing all routes 57 routes total

Alpine - 57 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
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Access: Useful Links- http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/west-matukituki-track/ To Liverpool Hut http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/liverpool-hut-track/ To French Ridge Hut http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/french-ridge-track/

Attribution: Photo: DL Homer/ NZ Geological Survey.

Showing all routes 30 routes total 3033 m

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Alpine - 30 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2.75 3+
Aspiring se optScreen%20shot%202012 01 19%20at%202.37.18%20pm

The Matterhorn of New Zealand. Maori: Tititea.

Access: Mount Aspiring is usually reached from Pearl Flat. French Ridge Hut can be used as a base to climb the South West Ridge and South Face, Is the preferred route. Bevan Col accesses Colin Todd Hut, which can be used as a base for the North Buttress, North West Ridge, South West Ridge and the Haast Range. ‡ Note. In winter or early spring it is recommended to use the French Ridge access routes to get to the Bonar Glacier. After the spring avalanche cycle, or when the Quarterdeck becomes impassable, use the Bevan Col route.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo, DL Homer & Geoff Wayatt.

11
Coxcomb Ridge
Grade 3.25
The first ascent of this long impressive ridge was made by Roy Beedham and Stuart Holmes on January 11, 1953. Two years previously, however, what very nearly turned out to be a successful ascent was made by D W Peacock, N O’Neill and M Pemberton, more or less by accident. After reaching a point estimated to be about 70 metres below the summit at 7pm they elected to retreat, eventually bivvying on the ridge at about 2835m, before returning to French Ridge the next day, minus success and the seats of their trousers. A few days later, having reached the summit by a more orthodox route, they were ruefully able to identify the point they had reached. The ridge is reached from the head of the Bonar at a snow col just west of Pope’s Nose. A lower set of gendarmes are rather rotten, but above these the quality of the rock improves. Most parties have preferred to keep to the northern side of the ridge as much as possible to avoid verglas. Near the top of the lower section of gendarmes is a prominent overhang, which has been turned on either side. The overhang is followed by a long snow arête, towards the top of which the Coxcomb is joined by the North East Ridge. Above this is a further series of gendarmes separated by snow or ice arêtes and including a three metre drop which is usually jumped, or can be rappelled if necessary, before a final short snow arête leads to the summit. Times for the route vary greatly. The ridge has been climbed in 5 hours; however, most competent parties in ropes of two could expect to take about 8–9 hours.

Showing all routes 13 routes total

Alpine - 13 routes - avg. grade 5 0 - 2.75 3+
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The first ascent of the South Face was made by Pete Moore and Revill Bennett on Christmas Eve, 1971. The climb commenced as a reconnaissance in deteriorating weather at 2pm and was concluded, 12 hours later, in a snowstorm. A bivouac was attempted on the face but in the absence of adequate bivvy gear it was soon abandoned and the climb continued. Subsequent attempts to dig in were also abandoned due to cold and lack of food and the descent was eventually commenced at 2am, French Ridge Hut being regained at 9am. The second ascent was made by Bill Denz and Limbo Thompson in early May 1972. They started up the face at 1pm bivvying as darkness fell, about 50 metres below the upper part of the Coxcomb Ridge before completing the climb and returning to French Ridge the next day. A direct finish to the route was made by Moore and Bennett in August, 1973. A variation including the lower rock band was climbed by Ken Hyslop and Neil Whiston in January 1976.

Attribution: References: Allan Uren & John Cocks. | http://alpineteam.co.nz/2014/south-face-aspiring-new-route-shooting-star | Photo: Duncan Ritchie. |

1
Original Line
Grade 4
This route on the South Face involves a climb of 530m from the foot of the face. It generally parallels the South West Ridge up a series of small snow ramps and intervening rock steps, until below the very steep rock face directly beneath the summit. Here there is a prominent snow arête which is crossed and a rising traverse is followed until the exit gullies are reached. There are a number of these all of a similar grade.
2
Denz Thompson
Grade 4
Denz and Thompson turned the bottom rock band by way of the ice cliffs above the schrund at the western end of the rock band. The upper part of the route sidles beneath the summit rock face until better angled ice slopes lead out on to the snow arête of the upper Coxcomb, about 50m below the summit.
3
Quite Direct
Grade 5
A direct finish variation which avoids any sidling and tops out on the summit. When the prominent snow arête below the summit rock band is reached go straight up and climb a narrow five metre ice pillar sandwiched between a slab on the left and an overhanging wall on the right. Then there are 3-4 pitches up a gully which ends on the summit.
4
Santa Claws
Grade 5
An ice climb on the leftmost part of the South Face. Start as for route 1 but continue directly up to the schist headwall above (rather than following the right tending ramps of 1 & 2). At the headwall follow a ramp that climbs rightward. At the top of this a rock and ice chimney (crux) breaks through the headwall to join the Summit Ridge. Cross over this ridge into the gully at the top of the South West Ridge and continue up easy ground to the summit. Completed in 52 hours return from Christchurch.
5
Mixed Aspirations
Grade 5.25
This is a fine line tackling the bottom rock band at its proudest point. The rock band is the most difficult climbing and is generally of a mixed nature. At about three quarters height the route joins the other routes and finishes up the Moore direct finish. 12 pitches.
6
24 Hour Party People
Grade 5.25
A reasonably direct line that climbs through the overhangs in the middle of the South Face. It exited up "Perspiring" about 2 hours after it had been ascended.
7
Whiston Hyslop Line
Grade 5.25
Starts out right through the bottom rock band onto the ice field mid-height, then angles back left diagonal towards the summit and the normal exit gullies. About 10 pitches were climbed after the rock band.
P
Perspiring
Grade 5.25
Starts up obvious ramp ( Scottish 4) to the R of the lower rock band. Traverses L then exits onto the Coxcomb where indicated.
S
Shooting Star
Grade 5.25
Start as for Perspiring. Climb through the lower rock band, follow gully and then gradually traverse left until under obvious notch. Head up through some ice/mixed pitches and exit at the obvious notch at the coxcomb. 12 x 60m pitches plus four pitches along the Coxcomb ridge. Cruxes pitche 1 WI3 & M3, Pitch 3 WI3+ & M4, Pitch 10 WI3+ & M3, Pitch 12 M4 8-12 ice screws, single set of cams 0 - 2, single set of wires 1 - 7, 8-12 draws.
T
Thales
Grade 0

8
Leo Hugo
Grade 5
Starts just left of The Shiny Beast, linking together two ice ramps.
9
The Shiny Beast
Grade 5
A steep nine pitch ice route. There were about four pitches through the bottom rock band and then a couple of easier pitches that were climbed simultaneously. Then a mixed pitch to join the Coxcomb about halfway along the ridge. Required a bivvy just below the ‘Coxcomb’. The Beast being the ice; it was green and glistening but good to climb.
10
Chocolate Fish Route
Grade 4
This slash on the right side of the face was used as a variant start to the Coxcomb. The route is nice straight up ice climbing and a wonder-filled start to the Coxcomb. Some of the route approaches vertical but bridging eases the strain. Five full fifty-metre pitches.
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North Face of Mt Aspiring

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo Geoff Wayatt

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Original North Face
Grade 3
The North Face, described as an enjoyable climb on good rock, follows a rock rib up the centre of the face before a section of mixed climbing leads into the Coxcomb Ridge, about 600 metres below the summit. Access to the start of the climb via the Therma Glacier is rapid and easy This route and Been On A Bender are best attempted when riming on the Coxcomb is light, otherwise bombing, resembling the Blitzkrieg could be encountered.
17
Been On A Bender
Grade 5
The climb has a brilliantly sunny aspect. It offers best conditions in late summer although access into the Therma Glacier could be a problem. It follows the less prominent rib up the face right of the Bogie/Hislop route. Eight pitches on the steep part of the face through a series of small overhangs on good rock. A further six rock pitches to the Coxcomb. Fourteen pitches in all. Fourteen hours return from Colin Todd Hut.
15
North East Ridge (Surgeon Spur)
Grade 3
The North East Ridge separates the Volta from the Therma Glacier. It was first climbed independently by two parties, Lindsay Bruce, Ian Bagley, Brian Wilkins, and Reg Scott, from Otago; and Dick Tornquist, Ivan Pickens, Jack Rattenbury, and J D Rockell, from Auckland, on January 4, 1955. The Otago party spent four nights out, two in a snow cave where the ridge meets the Coxcomb. To add to their discomfort they received shocks during an electrical storm. The whole epic makes absorbing reading and may have deterred subsequent attempts. However the third party on the climb found the route to be both practicable and enjoyable. It should be noted that the ridge merges with the upper part of the Coxcomb and that the most difficult pitches occur on the latter. Access from the top of Shipowner Ridge is by traversing the basin of the upper Therma and then up easy crevassed slopes to where the ridge is gained, either by the highest continuous snow tongue on to the ridge or by slabby pitches above a large rock tower, two to three hours from the hut. The ridge is exposed and generally of shattered rock; however, a long sidle on the eastern (Volta) side, about 15 metres below the ridge crest, allows many of the steeper pitches of the lower part of the ridge to be avoided. A more difficult section occurs higher up, before 200 metres of steep snow lead on to the Coxcomb Ridge. The remaining part of the Coxcomb appears to require at least as much time as the North East Ridge. The climb, including a descent by the North West Ridge has been done in 12 hours.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75
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Variations of the North West Ridge

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo VC Browne.

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Original North West Ridge
Grade 2
The North West Ridge was first climbed by Samuel Turner, Harold Hodgkinson, Jack Murrell and George Robertson on March 11, 1913, during the second ascent of the mountain. After climbing French Ridge and the Quarterdeck, they then travelled down the Bonar to reach the ridge near its junction with Shipowner Ridge. The exposure and difficulties of the climb were subsequently greatly exaggerated by Turner, who concluded that ‘the first climb and probably the last of Mount Aspiring’s east precipices was finished’. Turner was geographically disoriented; his ‘east precipices’ were actually the northern slopes of the buttress, and their route, far from being avoided, has become instead the most popular on the mountain. Nevertheless, the achievement of this party, torn as it was by acrimonious bickering and with only one experienced mountaineer in its ranks, should not be underrated. Their climb involved more than 60 hours without sleep, including a bleak benightment in a storm above the buttress before continuing the descent in rain and wind the next day. For a short time in 2008 there were some protection bolts on the lower ridge, but due to loud opposition from a majority of mountaineers they were removed.
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Shipowner Ridge
Grade 2
From the hut Shipowner Ridge is followed to 70m below its junction with the North West Ridge, from where easy snow immediately below the rock on the north side leads around to the lower, level, gendarme-studded section of the North West Ridge. All the gendarmes may be turned or traversed easily. As the ridge starts to rise towards the big rock step of the buttress a prominent sloping slab leads out and around on to the Therma Face. After a short, steep pitch a series of ledges and intervening rock steps may be traversed on an ascending diagonal line until the ridge is regained at the level section above the buttress (2400m). Alternatively a route may be made directly up the Therma Face of the buttress and then along the crest of the ridge. Above the buttress a broad easy angled ridge of snow or slabby rock leads to the ice cap and the short, but narrow and exposed summit ridge. This route can be accessed from the Bonar Glacier by traversing north 400m.
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The lower section of the North West Ridge
Grade 2
The lower section of the North West Ridge below the buttress may be avoided by descending to the Bonar from the hut and regaining the ridge at the foot of the buttress. It is doubtful if this variation is any faster than the original route , and it is certainly less interesting.
22
The Ramp
Grade 2
The lower part of the North West Ridge and the buttress may be avoided by descending to the Bonar from the hut and following up easy crevassed slopes to where a steep snow or ice ramp (45–55°) on the south face of the buttress leads up to the level section on the ridge above. Rock showing through on the bergschrund of the ramp may cause considerable difficulties in late summer (grade 13) and windslab avalanche conditions may be encountered from wind loading from the west at any time of the year. ‡ This route has been the scene of several fatalities. The factors of late afternoon soft snow and a steepening slope require extra caution.
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Early summer rapid access to the ridge
Grade 2
In early summer rapid access to the ridge above the buttress may sometimes be gained by descending from the top of Shipowner Ridge into the Therma Basin and crossing easy snow below the North Face of the buttress to a point where an all snow route leads back to the ridge. This route, on the sunny face, is soon cut by schrunds as the season progresses. This is also a good descent route early season. A rappel can be made from the flat spot at 2470m. Times for the North West Ridge vary greatly; a rapid return climb time would be 8 hours. The average is 11–12 hours and slow parties have been observed doing overtime up to 18 hours!
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Accessed from the Bonar Glacier.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo VC Browne

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West Couloir
Grade 3
This steep seven pitch couloir provides interesting and rapid access to the North West Shoulder in winter and early summer conditions.
14
Forgotten Couloir
Grade 0
A pleasant, direct line up a 55–65 degree ice couloir topping out on the North West Ridge. In best condition from early summer to January. Approximately eight pitches.
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West Face
Grade 3
The West Face, route of the first ascent of Aspiring in 1909, was not repeated until 1965, when Jill Tremain and lan Jowett made the second ascent. Cross the schrund at the head of the access slopes from the Bonar Glacier and follow up the shallow gully in the centre of the face. A steep rock band cuts across the top of the face and this may be turned by climbing out, either on steep snow slopes to the North West Ridge, or by the couloir at the top of the South West Ridge

Rocky and remote.

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Dave and Richard’s Route
Grade 6
A quality modern rock route up an elegant buttress. The route takes a line up the buttress to the left of the North East Face following perfect crack systems. It starts on a small slab at the toe of the buttress. The problem is getting into this route. Dave and Richard rappelled down off the Coxcomb from the Bonar, a somewhat committing prospect. If snow conditions allow there is a snow ramp down off Pope’s Nose but this breaks up quickly.
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Bogie Bell
Grade 5
The North East Face was climbed by Lindsay Bell and Don Bogie in August, 1978. Bivvys were necessary at the bottom and top of the climb. Bell and Bogie reported that due to the poor nature of the rock and the risk of stonefall, the climb would only be practicable when iced up. The route starts out to the left of the obvious ice streaks running down the middle of the face and then, when roofs are encountered traverses into the main streak, which usually has clean rock to the right of it.
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James Langley Wags Work
Grade 6
An excellent line that follows nine pitches of very good, weathered rock, before deteriorating as it nears the North East Ridge. Climbed in 12 x 60m pitches. To descend, the first ascent party partly descended the North East Ridge before making four 50–60m abseils to the glacier.
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North Buttress
Grade 3
The North Buttress is a strangely neglected route, offering as it does a direct and exacting rock climb on the sunny face of the mountain, with amazing views of the ocean as you’re climbing. From the crest of Shipowner Ridge descend into the upper basin of the Therma Glacier and cross easy crevassed slopes to the foot of the buttress. Easy slabs soon steepen to a 60 degree prominent light grey band, the top of which is about a third of the way up the climb. Cross the slabs going from right to left and go across a ledge which is very exposed over the North Face. Then follow the crest of the buttress. A series of gullies on the North Face should be on your left. Near the top of the buttress broken rock just to the east of the ridge crest is followed by a short pitch of snow before the final rock step, which is turned by shallow gullies on the east. A short snow or ice slope then leads directly to the summit. The rock grade is about 13 and if it gets any harder than that then you are possibly off route. When the buttress is iced up with riming the mixed climbing is good. Beware of falling ice. The first ascent began as a reconnaissance, but even with a three-man rope the climb was completed from the foot of the buttress in the remarkable time of 3 1/2 hours.
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South West Ridge
Grade 3.25
This is one of the classic climbs of the Southern Alps. The ridge is gained from the Bonar glacier, normally by its western flank at any convenient point below the rock band. About 150m below the summit, the ridge runs out into a steep open couloir, in which steep ice or even steep rock is often encountered, which nowadays is 80 degrees, before the ice cap and summit ridge are reached. Above the crux step there are about two 55–60 degree exposed pitches of potentially delicate snow and ice climbing to where the ridge joins the North West Ridge. This route is exposed to very cold wind so it's important to carry more clothes than you would normally expect.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2252 m

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Maybe the person who named Barff was sick of mountains when they chris- tened it. From Aspiring Hut Barff is one of the prettiest peaks in the park and is a joy to climb. Being of small stature and on the Main Divide it is one of the first peaks to be cloaked in West Coast clag. It was first climbed, solo, by Gordon Speden on Christmas Day, 1929. What a great Christmas present that would have made.

Access: From Liverpool Bivouac

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo; Geoff Wayatt/ Mountian Recreation.

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The South West Ridge.
Grade 2
The South West ridge is a straightforward mixed climb leading from Arawata Saddle to the lower of the twin summit towers. The prominent step on the ridge above Arawata Saddle (sometimes called Bow Peak) may be traversed, or turned on the Arawata side. The easiest route on the higher (eastern) of the twin summit cones is on the north-western side. Time to the summit is about five to six hours.
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The South Face.
Grade 2
This broad crevassed snow face is reached by traversing towards Arawata Saddle for about half an hour, until suitable access to the snowfield is found. An easy snow climb then leads to the rocky summit cones. This is probably the quickest route on Barff and would take three to four hours in good conditions. Large schrunds which have developed in recent years near the top of the face may be difficult to cross.
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The North Ridge.
Grade 4
The North Ridge is a much more demanding climb than any of the other recognised routes on the mountain. To get to the North Ridge use access routes from Matukituki Saddle the ridge consists of easy rock and snow as far as its junction with the ridge separating the Arawata and Waipara watersheds. Three prominent buttresses follow. The first is climbed by a steep rock couIoir to gain a snow ridge above, from where an easier mixed section leads to the second buttress. This is the crux of the climb as it overhangs slightly at the bottom and although the rock is sound, there are few holds. Brown and Hutchins climbed it direct but a break in the west side may offer an easier route. The upper part of the buttress consists of a smooth vertical face at the top of a sharp snow arête, and was turned on a narrow and exposed crack on the eastern side of the ridge. The third buttress is climbed by a crooked chimney well round on the west side. Above this steep snow leads to the summit towers, of which the easternmost is the highest and is climbed by easy rock on its north-west side. The first ascent was made in heavily iced conditions and took about nine hours from Matukituki Saddle to the summit.
Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
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Avalanche is a very attractive mountain, especially as seen from French Ridge. It offers a variety of routes, several of which are ‘on’ in a relatively short day from the hut or if the weather is looking doubtful.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks, Photo: DL Homer/ NZ Geological Survey.

The East Ridge and East Peak of Avalanche dominate the view from the road up the Matukiktuki Valley. They also dominated Paul Powell’s climbing intentions for six years until October 23, 1960, when with Don McTaggart, Bob Cunninghame and Geoff Bayliss, he finally succeeded with a route from the Hood Glacier.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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East Ridge
Grade 3
Climb to the col west of Duncan’s Knob, either from Glacier Burn or Aspiring Flat. The ridge is then followed, with some minor digressions on the north side to turn some of the early bumps. A difficult step about 70m high occurs just past a sharp bend in the ridge; beyond this the ridge is a mixture of very easy sections on loose rock and more demanding climbing on the steeper sections, until the col at the foot of the final step below the peak is reached. This step has been climbed by a difficult chimney on the north east side, but easier ledges with good holds are present on the Avalanche Glacier side. The first ascent, from a bivvy near the col at the end of the ridge, required about nine hours to the summit.
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Via Hood Glacier
Grade 2
Access the Hood Glacier. From the head of the névé a short but steep rock climb leads to the summit ridge between the east and the middle peaks. The rock notch can also be reached from the col between Duncan’s Knob and the East Ridge (approached either from Aspiring Flat or Glacier Burn), by sidling the first knob of the ridge on the north side on an exposed deer trail, and then traversing, on a gradual descent, the snowgrass ledges and snow on the north side of the ridge. The climb would require a bivvy above the bushline.
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The North Ridge.
Grade 2
The ridge is reached from the head of the Bonar Glacier. Most parties, seeking protection from the weather, have climbed on very exposed ledges on the Kitchener side, however, the crest of the ridge or the western slabs may be more desirable in good conditions. Two prominent steps occur. The first is low on the ridge and can apparently be negotiated on either side, but the upper one is turned by ledges on the east. The ridge takes 3 to 4 hours from the head of the glacier or 6 to 7 hours from French Ridge Hut.
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The West Ridge.
Grade 2
Climb to the Bonar via the Quarterdeck and continue up the glacier on the north side of the ridge to avoid the gendarmes of the lower section. Gain the ridge at the foot of the slabs. Although some of the rock is loose, the slabs offer pleasant climbing (approx. rock grade 10) and lead directly to the West (highest) Peak. The time necessary from the hut to the summit is usually between 4 to 6 hours.
4
From the Maud Francis Glacier
Grade 2
From the Maud Francis Glacier cross the schrund to reach the steep snow ramp leading up below but parallel to the slabs of the West Ridge. The ramp joins the summit ridge just east of the West Peak. This route has been skied.
5
Maud Francis Glacier (snow lead)
Grade 1.25
A less prominent, and less steep, snow lead rises from the Maud Francis Glacier almost directly below the notch of the summit ridge. The snow runs out about 30 metres below the middle peak and the climb is completed on the easy rock of the South Ridge. Late in the season this route may be almost clear of snow and may be followed on easy slabs.
6
The South Ridge.
Grade 2
The South Ridge leads directly to the Middle Peak. Climb the Quarterdeck to the Bonar and descend the Flightdeck to reach the Maud Francis Glacier. The rock of the South Ridge is reached from a snow lead where the ridge begins to steepen towards the peak. During the first ascent most of the climbing was done on the steep loose rock of the eastern side of the ridge in order to escape the wind but in better conditions the slabby western side may be found easier. The prominent tower about halfway up is turned on the west. The first ascent was made in 5 hours from Colin Todd Hut and the climb would probably take a similar time from French Ridge. To traverse to the East Peak requires only a few minutes along an easy ridge. The traverse to the West Peak has not been made in this direction, but would probably involve rappelling into the notch.
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Traverse from West to East Peak.
Grade 4
The traverse of the summit ridge is a far more exacting proposition than the West Ridge. The crux of the traverse is a deep notch, which requires a very delicate descent of a forty metre wall and an even more difficult climb out the other side. Kennedy and Innes took seven hours from the west to the middle peak, of which three were spent getting past the notch. The ridge from the middle to the East Peak is straightforward and normally requires only a few minutes. This route has probably not had a second ascent.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2356 m

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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The West Face.
Grade 1
Follow the Breakaway route from French Ridge Hut across the West Face towards the Bonar until either the first or second ramp above the Quarterdeck can be climbed to the summit ridge. The climb would take three to four hours from the hut. ➠ This route is subject to summer avalanches.
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From the Bonar Glacier.
Grade 1
From the top of the Quarterdeck traverse north-west along an easy snow ridge. Alternatively follow down the Bonar, striking up on to the ridge at any convenient point. Time, from French Ridge Hut to the summit, is about three hours.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2091 m

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Joffre south fmt

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Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From the Bonar Glacier.
Grade 1
From the Bonar, Joffre is half an hour’s easy rock scramble up any convenient route.
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The South Face. From Cannibalism to Karaoke.
Grade 4
From the head of the Matukituki Valley the South Face of Joffre is more involved than a half hour scramble. From near Scotts Bivvy head up to the face which is on the true right of the Breakaway. A steep spur just to the right of the avalanche gut carved by the Breakaway gives easy access to the face. The first ascent took a line which starts off a large patch of snow under an overhanging wall. Then taking the line of least resistance, climbed on a rising traverse which took in a series of ledges to come out near the top of the true right of the large gully that runs on a diagonal from the base of the face to the summit. There are approximately 10 pitches and, of these, half are good rock. It would be possible to construct a more pleasant line by the use of bolts and taking a more direct line to the summit. After topping out on the first ascent, to a perfect summers evening, the two climbers wandered down the Bonar to Colin Todd Hut in running shoes. Like a couple of street kids they threw themselves on the mercy of the residents and passed a pleasant night with borrowed food and a blanket. Camaraderie and hospitality are still alive and well in the hills—may it always be so. ➠ The slopes above the face are subject to avalanches.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2030 m

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Bevan is not so much a climb as a glorious viewpoint. Still it is in the greater alps and not to be taken lightly. It was the scene of one of the most protracted and gruelling rescues in the region, a five day ordeal for a dozen men trapped on Bevan Col. The whole story can be read in the classic book Men Aspiring by Paul Powell. The peak was first climbed by Dennis Leigh, Bill Walker, and Jock Sim, who filled in the rest of their afternoon after their first ascent of Avalanche on December 28, 1939 by racing down the Bonar to Bevan Col and on to Bevan, before returning to French Ridge via the Quarterdeck that evening.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From Bevan Col
Grade 1
From Bevan Col easy snow and broken rock slopes lead direct to the summit. Tempting ledges leading around on to the North Face terminate on exposed rock and should be avoided by parties more interested in the view. The climb is unlikely to take more than an hour from the col.
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The North Ridge.
Grade 1.25
The ridge is gained from gravelly ledges leading up from the Bonar just above the icefall. Then a slabby ridge is followed which is straightforward although quite exposed, with a few small towers towards the top. The ridge takes about two hours, with five hours being necessary for the round trip from Colin Todd Hut.
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The South West Ridge.
Grade 1
From Hector Col the South West Ridge is a straightforward mixed rock and snow climb, probably requiring about two hours from the col to the summit. Hector Col is reached using the Bevan Col route

Ansted was first climbed by Frank Wright and J R Simpson, from the Dart Valley, on February 21, 1914.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Via the Cascade Saddle track.
Grade 1
From the top of the Cascade Saddle track, which is marked by a tripod pylon, head south along the ridge towards the low peak of Tyndall, until a suitable line across the Isobel Glacier is reached. Alternatively cross the upper basin of Cascade Creek to reach the easy angled North Ridge. The top fifty metres of rather loose rock are interesting climbing—brush up on the art of climbing choss. Ansted is a long climb from Aspiring Hut, especially as it is commonly combined with an ascent of Tyndall. The climb to the top of the saddle takes about 4 hours, with a further 3 to 4 hours to reach the top of Mt Ansted.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75
Plunket isling opt 0

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo DG Bishop.

Plunket isling opt

Useful liknk- Cascade Saddle http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/queen... GOVERNORS’ RIDGE Access to Plunket Dome, Islington and Liverpool Governors’ Ridge is the ridge connecting Plunket Dome, Islington and Liverpool and is the edge of the upper Dart Névé.

Access: Access to a fantastic alpine wander can be had by travelling up Cascade Saddle along Governors’ Ridge and down one of the ridges above Rough Creek.

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks. Photo DG Bishop.

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Via the Cascade Saddle track.
Grade 1
From the top of the track follow around and through a basin to Cascade Saddle. North of the saddle Governors’ Ridge, an easy, broad, but crevassed snow ridge leads over Plunket Dome and Islington to Liverpool. From Aspiring Hut to Liverpool requires about 7 hours.
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Via the ridge north of Rough Creek.
Grade 2
From Aspiring Hut cross Cascade Creek (bridged) and strike up through the bush from the top of the flats opposite the hut, to meet Rough Creek at the foot of the hill slope. Cross Rough Creek on avalanche ice to gain the scrubby ridge to the north. The ridge joins Governors’ Ridge between Plunket Dome and Islington. The main obstacle is usually a large schrund a short distance below Governors’ Ridge. The first ascent party took five and a half hours to reach Governors’ Ridge from a bivvy well above the bushline. It seems likely that this time could be improved considerably in good conditions and a time of six hours from Aspiring Hut to the ridge seems reasonable.
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Via the ridge south of Rough Creek
Grade 2
From Rough Creek (Route 3.2) climb through the bush and scrub of the ridge immediately south of the creek. Traverse left (south) across scree about 50m above the scrub line into a gully. Cross the creek in the gully and work up through the snowgrass bluffs to the south to reach a ridge with a clear gully on either side. Climb straight up the ridge until it peters out level with the snout of a small glacier descending from Plunket Dome. An easy traverse leads across to the glacier, the south side of which is then followed up to Governors’ Ridge, about 350m above Cascade Saddle. This route would probably take about five hours to Governors’ Ridge. It was investigated in 1954 as a possible alternative route to the Dart, and remnants of a cut track may be found below the bushline.
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The North East Face.
Grade 2
Follow the route towards Arawata Saddle. After climbing about half the steep section below the saddle access is obtained to a snow shelf leading out to the south-east, which provides a straightforward route to the summit, with two pitches of steep, loose rock to the summit ridge. About five hours out from the hut. With glacial recession this route may be difficult or dangerous from ice and rockfall.
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The East Ridge.
Grade 2
There appears to be no record of a complete ascent from Shovel Flat although the upper part of the ridge was climbed on January 16, 1970, by Brian Chalmers, Jill West, Judy Knewstubb, Rod McKenzie and Don Murray, who gained the ridge by traversing across the Christopher Johnson Glacier. James Frater, David Gauld and David Smyth traversed the ice-field NE of Liverpool and Islington Dome from Arawhata Saddle then climbed the east ridge 18 January 1965.

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Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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From the Dart Glacier.
Grade 2
This route gives access to the upper basin of the Dart Glacier, where easy crevassed slopes lead up to the peak. The once easy slopes immediately east of the icefall are now generally impassable due to glacial recession. The route to the west of the icefall ascends an avalanche gully until level with a broad ledge which is reached by traversing across steep shingle. This route is threatened by avalanche in early summer. The icefall has been descended on skis in winter during the early 1990s but that may have been an exception. From Cascade Saddle Route is a much more direct approach to Liverpool.
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The North Ridge.
Grade 3
he North Ridge rises abruptly from Arawata Saddle in two large steps. The lower one appears to be a relatively broad buttress which might best be climbed on the west side. The second however appears to involve a narrow and exposed section of ridge above the second step the angle of the ridge eases and the remainder of the climb appears relatively straightforward on the snow slopes or rock slabs west of the ridge crest before a short rock pitch at the top
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West Face.
Grade 2
From Arawata move south through ledge systems before gaining steep gullies and loose rock below the summit ridge. Climbed from a bivvy below Arawata Saddle. 7 hours return.

Showing all routes 25 routes total

Alpine - 25 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
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Access: Useful Link http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/east-matukituki-valley-tracks/ http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/wilkin-valley-east-matukituki-traverse/ ➠ It should be noted that despite the ease of access with a helicopter the Upper Kitchener Cirque is an isolated place and to escape from it in a storm would be a serious proposition, not joking.

Attribution: Photos: Colin Montieth, Hedgehog House. & DG Bishop.

Sisyphus, although only a scramble in summer conditions, reigns supreme as the viewpoint of the East Matukituki. An incredible view of Mt Aspiring and all the other big peaks is the prize for climbing this peak. There are three main approaches, the best one being by the West Ridge via Wilmot Saddle and Rainbow Stream.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Via Wilmot Saddle.
Grade 1
This is the recommended route. Follow up Rainbow Stream from Aspiring Flat to where scree and scrub slopes lead up to Wilmot Saddle (1680m). Stay on the true left of Rainbow Stream until the slopes below Wilmot Saddle ease in steepness. From the saddle follow the West Ridge to the summit. Rainbow Valley, like most of the valleys of the area, is subject to avalanche danger in the spring and early summer.
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The South Ridge.
Grade 1
From Aspiring Flat climb through bush and scrub from near the Rainbow-Kitchener confluence to gain the South Ridge which may then be followed to the summit. See the route identified on page 82 of Moir’s Guide North to avoid considerable scrub-bashing.
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The North East slopes.
Grade 1
From Ruth Flat climb the bush and tussock slopes on the north-east flank of the peak. The slopes directly below Wilmot Saddle are subject to stonefall and should be avoided.

The name, one of several in the East Maukituki with aeronautical connotations, commemorates a Dragonfly aircraft that went missing without trace, possibly in the Mount Aspiring area in 1962. The first recorded ascent of the peak was made by Paul Powell and Bruce Moore in March 1962, from the South Albertburn Saddle.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The North Ridge.
Grade 1
From Junction Flat cross the East Matukituki and follow the marked track up through the bush on the north side of Hester Pinney Creek. Above the bush easy tussock slopes lead around to the South Albertburn Saddle. From the saddle follow the straightforward tussock and rock of the North Ridge to the summit. This would take about seven to eight hours from the river.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1908 m

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Howard Boddy, the pioneer of the East Matukituki, made the first ascent of Aspinall with his brother, Ernie, in February 1930.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The South West Ridge.
Grade 1
Continue up the East Matukituki until near the foot of the waterfall, where a ridge leads North East directly to the summit. The scrub can be avoided by climbing up a small creek bed on the south side of the ridge, the crest of which then provides a straightforward route to the peak. Snow faces on the south side of the ridge allow some gaps and towers to be bypassed. The summit rocks are most easily climbed on the north side. The climb takes about seven hours from Ruth Flat to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1981 m

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Lois was first climbed by Howard Boddy and Jack Foster in February 1933.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Ridge from Rabbit Pass.
Grade 1
Climb to the shelf above the waterfall at the head of the East Matukituki. A broad easy ridge leads eastwards to the summit, about one hour from the point where the shelf is reached and four to five hours from Ruth Flat. ➠ Note: This is not the peak of Lois marked on the metric topo map, the Lois metric map point is further on and more tricky).

Originally called Gehenna Rock, Tantalus Rock was first climbed by Paul Powell and Peter Child on January 10, 1965.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Via Ruth Ridge.
Grade 2
From the top of Ruth Ridge, Tantalus Rock is but a few minutes easy scramble above the Volta Névé. It would probably take about five hours from Ruth Flat to the summit.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
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This small peak is a great vantage point and has a stomach sucking drop down the East Face. It is an exposed straightforward climb from the Bonar Glacier.

Attribution: Alen Uren & John Cocks, Photo: Colin Montieth, Hedgehog House.

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From the Bonar Glacier
Grade 2
A short climb up steep snow slopes beneath and between the two peaks, then an airy traverse eastwards along the ridge. About five hours from French Ridge Hut.
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The North East Ridge.
Grade 3
Although the North East Ridge is steep, clean-cut, and appealing, it was not attempted until 1969, when it was climbed by Laurie Kennedy and Dave Innes. The ridge is gained from Moncrieff Col, to the upper shelf of the Volta Glacier. Continue up the snow until underneath the peak and following a sloping ledge back out to the south west to gain the ridge at the foot of the steep section. From here the climbing is sustained about grade 14-15 with wild exposure down the East Face. The rock is good, with an easier section high on the ridge followed by another short steep section immediately below the summit. The climb requires about six hours from Moncrieff Col to the peak. It is also possible to access the Volta from the Bonar by descending down between the two peaks of Pope’s Nose. Two rappels may be required. This route is only practicable if a large snow ramp is formed on the north side.
3
Bishop’s Buttress.
Grade 0
During summer the face is usually free of ice and good clean rock prevails. In the summer of 1999 Dave Vass, Richard Turner, Allan Uren and Clinton Beavan made the first summer ascents via different routes. Helicopter access was used. Bishop’s Buttress is the buttress on the left side of the face and tops out on the Bonar Glacier, not the summit of Pope’s Nose. The first 8 or 9 pitches are up a corner system of perfect rock at grade 17. A standard rock rack was used. After a prominent tower the rock deteriorates, but could possibly be better if instead of going to the tower you trend right up a steep wall. The last four pitches are of poor rock and care is required not to end up on bird-brain boulevard.
4
F*** The Pope.
Grade 6
The East Face is a fantastic sweep of compact dark schist with small roofs which lend it an air of impregnability. During winter this air hangs heavily around the face and lines of ice contribute to give it an unfriendly persona. This is what Nick Cradock, Brian Alder, Dave Fearnley and Lionel Clay were hoping to sample when they made the first ascent, during winter, of the face. The face had been attempted before by Nick and various partners, but they were thwarted by a lack of good ice. This seems to be a characteristic of the face. The first, and subsequent ascent parties have used a helicopter to access this very isolated place. A challenge still exists for a party to walk in and climb—a committing prospect. As of the printing of this guide the face has not been repeated in winter. This 18 pitch route is steepest in the lower section and weaves around linking up the runnels. With fatter ice it would be possible to take a more direct line. The first ascent party bivvied and, unless good conditions are encountered, a bivvy for successive parties will also be required because of the size of the route and short winter days.
5
The Vision
Grade 0
This is a fine line up the centre of the face on steep solid rock. Twelve technical pitches and then some scrambling to the Bonar Glacier.

This name, along with Parachute Pass, commemorates an early and ill-fated experiment in the air dropping of supplies to a mountaineering party in the Kitchener Cirque in 1933. The peak was first climbed by Graham Bishop and Roger Barrowclough on December 27, 1961, from a camp on Moncrieff Col.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The South Buttress.
Grade 2.25
The South Buttress is reached by traversing across from the Moncrieff Col route and then following directly up snow and shattered rock just west of the crest of the middle rib.
-
The North Face.
Grade 2
The North Face is a short rock climb from the Volta Névé. The hardest pitches occur on sound rock leading out of the windscoop surrounding the peak and into the east side of a shallow gully. After 30–50m cross to the west side of this gully and climb out to the ridge, where easy loose rock leads to the summit. Time from the névé to the summit is 1–2 hours.
-
The North East Ridge.
Grade 2
The North East Ridge is a straightforward rock climb taking about one hour from the névé.

The first ascent of Moncrieff (originally named Mercer) was made on January 4, 1959, by Garth Matterson, Don Mee and Dove Tarrant, from Moncrieff Col.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The South Face.
Grade 2
Follow the Moncrieff Col route from Aspiring Flat to reach the snowfield below the col. Traverse north to reach the rib separating the Kitchener and Lucas Glaciers. This rib leads to a steep snowfield below the South Face, which is then climbed by a direct line to the summit. The rock is unpleasantly loose but otherwise not unduly difficult. This is a very long climb from Aspiring Flat, probably requiring eight to ten hours to the summit, but the reward is a magnificent view. There is a bivvy rock on the Moncrieff Col route. This bivvy is big enough for three people to stay dry in even in the most atrocious conditions.
-
From Moncrieff Col.
Grade 1
Moncrieff can be climbed in a few minutes by easy slabs north east of Moncrieff Col.

Showing all routes 6 routes total 2383 m

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Alpine - 6 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2.75 3+
Fastnesse fmtFastness east fmt 129 volta fmt

To gaze up at the East Face from Ruth Flat… ‘a great featureless rock wall rising 1000m with no lines, no cracks, no ledges’ and the reason for the name is clear. No less awesome today than how it was perceived fifty years ago, the East Face of Fastness has proven to be a little shorter at 750m and there are cracks and ledges. But the climbing is as awesome as it was originally perceived to be, as Peter Dickson and his Polish partner, Miroslavc Sveticic found out when they made the first ascent in 1990. The pair accessed the face directly from Ruth Flat up the waterfall issuing from the face. In Peter’s understated comment ‘It’s not a good way to get there’, he sums up how well defended the face is. The West Ridge of Fastness and first ascent of the peak was completed by Paul Powell, Colin Marshall, John Sage and Earle Riddiford in Dec 1945 from a camp on the Volta Glacier. Twenty years later Paul Powell was again camped on the Volta, this time to make the first ascent of the North Ridge with Keith Skinner, Peter Child and Geoff Bayliss on January 2, 1965. The South Ridge was first ascended by Garth Matterson, Don Mee and Dave Tarrant on January 4, 1959. The mountain, and in particular the East Face, has everything the modern alpinist could wish for and will always deliver an intense experience.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photos: John Clyma, DG Bishop & Ducan Ritchie.

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North Ridge
Grade 1.25
The first 300m are steep and are climbed by a series of steep and loose rock couloirs, with some difficult pitches towards the top. The angle then eases and a long section can be turned on easy snow on the west side, before a final short, steep rock pitch leads to the summit.
-
South Ridge
Grade 1
The South Ridge is a straightforward rock ridge rising from the Volta Glacier near Rainbow Col. This col is not accessible from the east. To descend the South Ridge to Moncrieff Col would take about 3 hours.
4
East Ridge
Grade 3.25
The ridge rises steeply for about 400m in a series of buttresses from the west end of Wilmot Saddle. The rock is generally poor, and is muddy and vegetated on the East Face side. Belay points are found using pitons and a good selection are recommended for this route. The ridge was also descended after the first winter ascent using two 60m ropes and pitons. Normal descent routes available are via Moncrieff Col or Ruth Ridge. Gain the foot of the ridge from Wilmot Saddle or by steep gullies leading to a prominent notch at the foot of the ridge. When there is sufficient snow the gully option is the best. The first buttress is good rock and may be climbed direct; thereafter the crest of the ridge is followed where practicable until the angle eases and either the ridge or a snow route on the South Face can be followed to the summit. Although the first buttress is the most technically demanding part of the climb, the first party considered a very steep, poorly protected pitch of mud and rubbish necessary to bypass the third step, as the crux. It may be possible to bypass this pitch by continuing straight up the buttress, although this may be more technical. Times. From Wilmot Saddle to the top of the steep section takes about four hours, with a further two hours to the summit. From the summit to Moncrieff Col requires about three hours.

Sustained rock climbing in summer, steep ice in winter.

5
Storming the Barbican
Grade 6
This 16-pitch winter route aims for a series of corners just left of the summit pyramid. The most difficult section is on the upper third of the face with two crux pitches of steep technical ice. At half height there is a large obvious steep gully which was avoided by traversing into the top from out left. The first ascent party experienced an unplanned bivvy near the top of the face below the final crux, but this could have been avoided by an earlier start and climbing in the longer daylight hours of August. This crux was a pitch of near vertical chandelier water ice. If the face is climbed in thin conditions, short snowstakes, pitons and snargs to bash, weld and coax into the mountain would be better than a rack of shiny titanium ice screws, although these would still come in handy. The face seems to form up between June and September. After September, because of the low altitude and sunny aspect, the ice on the face probably self-destructs.
6
Sveticic-Dickson
Grade 5
Access to the East Face is via the Rainbow Valley and gullies on the south side of Wilmot Saddle to a notch at the base of the East Ridge. This notch leads down onto a large terrace that bisects the bottom of the face. The East Face is a spectacular sweep of rock. The upper third is the steepest section. The first ascent of the face took a line up the center, topping out close to the summit. The route starts on the right hand side of three faint pillars in the middle of the face. Careful route finding is required through the top of these, at grade 16, as you move slightly left to line up with the top of the summit pyramid. It then carries on up to a pocketed slab on fantastic rock (grade 14 or not, take heaps of cams from size #1 Friend to #1 Camalot because you will wish to belay this if possible because the route is very hard to read from one move to the next due to it all being on horizontal pockets). This steepens and merges with the summit pyramid, a loose blocky grade 17. Sveticic & Dickson soloed most of the route, belaying only two pitches, in three and a half hours. Other rock routes are possible on this huge face. Note the summit pyramid is not the summit, the real summit is several hundred metres to the west. Descent was down the North Ridge, scrambling down ledge systems to the big terrace that bisects the bottom of the face, an easy descent route.
-
South Face
Grade 4
Lots of stuff at about rock grade 13. Quite a complicated route with lots of off-angle ledges.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2367 m

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Volta Glacier

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The West Ridge.
Grade 1
From Moncrieff Col traverse around the head of the Volta Névé beneath the ridge of the Main Divide before climbing about 100m of steep but easy rock to gain the upper shelf of the glacier. From the shelf good ledges lead up and east across the North Face of Scylla to give access to the col between Scylla and Charybdis. A short scramble on broken rock leads to the summit. The time to the top from Moncrieff Col is about five hours.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2409 m

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Volta Glacier

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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The East Ridge.
Grade 2
Follow route 3 until the col between Scylla and Charybdis is reached. The short ridge to the summit is barred by the crux of the climb, a difficult gendarme about 20m high, which is climbed direct. The climb takes about five hours from Moncrieff Col.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2367 m

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29 volta fmt 0

Glacier Dome has the distinction of being the first mountain in the area to be climbed as a recreational exercise. Admittedly Ebenezer Teichelmann, Alec Graham and Jack Clarke had higher aspirations in 1908, but they found their time exhausted after their long journey up the Waiatoto River. On February 1 they climbed a leading ridge north of the Volta icefall to reach a rocky peak (2015 m) above the névé. Descending to the glacier they then crossed over to the easy slopes of Glacier Dome, from where they admired Aspiring, their elusive objective.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo Duncan Ritchie.

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Via Ruth Ridge.
Grade 2
Climb Ruth Ridge and cross the Volta to the straightforward snow slopes leading to the summit of Glacier Dome, five to six hours from Ruth Flat. ➠ Note: Getting onto the Volta may be problematic at times, e.g. late summer, due to a steep broken section.

Showing all routes 47 routes total

Alpine - 47 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

I consider the name “Kuri’’ (the dog) for a not unattractive peak to be ill-chosen and unromantic, but there may be some justification for Awful and Dreadful. I am unaware who thought up these names, but they were given many years ago, at a time when these words had a meaning very different from their usage in the slang of today, and I feel they were given in all sincerity, the one solemnly impressive, inspiring awe; the other awe-inspiring. It is possible they have impressed to this degree those who have been privileged to look upon them. – Eric Miller, 1945 The mountains to the north of Mt Aspiring are fantastic. The approaches to Mts Alba, Castor, Pollux, and Mt Awful are a mirror image of the Aspiring peaks, in that they are approached up similar braided river valleys. However there are no alpine huts or glaciers on the scale of the Volta or Bonar glaciers, and most of the mountains are attempted from a bivvy. This is an area where trampers abound but mountaineers are thin on the ground. Many of the smaller peaks have had very few ascents since they were first climbed. The peaks are generally grouped together around the valleys they are commonly climbed from. But because peaks are situated on the Main Divide, where ascents have been made from the west they are noted in the text.

Access: Road access to the mountains to the north of Mt Aspiring is via the Wanaka–Haast highway (state highway 6). Makarora township, 80 kilometres from Wanaka, has a café, DoC centre and accommodation. Jet boat or plane access can be arranged for a quick trip to the upper Wilkin Valley: jetboats at Makarora Tourist Centre, Makarora (03 443-8372) and a light plane can be used to fly into Jumboland, the upper Wilkin and Siberia. The Wilkin and Young Valleys are tributaries of the Makarora and give access to Mts Alba, Awful, Castor and Pollux. Useful Links http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/wilkin-valley-tracks/ http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/tracks-and-walks/otago/wanaka-makarora/gillespie-pass-circuit/ Huts The valley huts that are present are owned and managed by DoC and a hut ticket or pass is necessary to stay in them. Alternatively, fees can be paid at any DoC office. Hut wardens are in attendance during the summer at Top Forks, Siberia and Young Huts. Kerin Forks Hut This hut can be found at the bush edge on the true right of the Wilkin River. It sleeps 10 and has a coal stove. 5–6 hours from the Makarora confluence. Top Forks Hut Located in the Upper Wilkin, beyond Jumboland Flat, Top Forks hut sleeps 10 and has a coal stove. It provides access to Mts Castor and Pollux. Siberia Hut Siberia Hut sleeps 20 and has a potbelly stove. It is handily located near an airstrip and it is possible to fly directly in from Makarora, though this idea may be abhorrent to some. Siberia Hut provides a base for climbs of Mt Alba. Young Hut Situated near the bushline below Gillespie Pass in the Young Basin. Young Hut sleeps 10. Used as a base for climbs on Mt Awful.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2127 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 1
Usually climbed via the leading spur that runs up from Waterfall Flat in the South Wilkin. On the first ascent the ridge south of the peak was reached via a dry creek bed from the South Wilkin. The party descended the East Ridge to a point where it was possible to drop down through bush to the Wilkin Valley floor.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2160 m

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Located at the end of the ridge that runs north-west from the summit of Castor.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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West Ridge
Grade 0
The pleasant slabs of the West Ridge have been climbed from the Drake valley.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1815 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Top Forks
Grade 0
From Top Forks, take the leading ridge. The ridge can also be gained via a prominent gully across the North Branch from Lake Diana. Perseus has also been climbed from the hanging valley to the east.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1945 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Jumboland
Grade 1
Climb the spur at the head of Jumboland Flats. A magnificent viewpoint.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2011 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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South East Ridge.
Grade 0
Just south of the Wonderland entrance, climb a boulder creek bed and through bush to the ridge. Has also been climbed from the hanging valley to the west.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2027 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Original Route
Grade 0
Just south of the Wonderland entrance, climb a boulder creek bed and through bush to the ridge. Has also been climbed from the hanging valley to the west.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1994 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From the Wonderland Valley
Grade 0
Climb the ridge leading to the summit from the Wonderland Valley. On the first ascent a snowcave was used—one of the first to be used in the New Zealand alps. Also climbed by traversing from Arne.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2012 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North Ridge.
Grade 2
Ascended from bivvy near Lake Castalia. A steep rock scramble and traverse down the south-west rock ledges.
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From Iphegenia
Grade 0
Traverse from Iphigenia.

Showing all routes 1 route total

tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Jumboland
Grade 0
From Jumboland, cross the Wilkin and take the creek to gain the ridge leading up from the Wonderland.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2141 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North Ridge.
Grade 0
From Newland Valley, climb to the saddle north of the peak.

Showing all routes 9 routes total 2192 m

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Alpine - 9 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Sb awful fmt

If cute was an acceptable word to use to describe a mountain then Mt Awful would be just that. It is a readily accessible peak with good rock as a bonus.

Access: Mt Awful can be approached via the Wilkin Valley and then up Siberia, or up the Young Valley from Makarora. The Young Valley is probably the best option. There is potential to find a good bivvy spot at the head of the valley, above Young Hut. Makarora to Young Hut: 8–9 hours.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo Shaun Barnett.

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North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
From the Siberia Valley climb to the saddle between Doris and Awful, then along the ridge.
1
South East Ridge
Grade 2.25
From Young Hut there is a well marked tramping route up onto Gillespie Pass. From here the ridge to Mt Awful is scrambling. There are a couple of rock steps which look steeper than they are before the actual ridge is reached. The climbing on the ridge isn’t technically difficult. After a snowfield is climbed there is a section of good solid rock along a knife-edged ridge, which is the trickiest part of the climb and may require a rope and a small rock rack.

Showing all routes 5 routes total

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Sb awful fmt 0

The East Face is a spectacular sweep of good solid rock and is the crowning glory of the Young Valley. There are three routes up the face; summer rock routes of good quality.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo Shaun Barnett. Jean Kenney - WICKED

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A Very Hungry Weka
Grade 0

2
The Weta Walk
Grade 4
This nine pitch route climbs out of the snowfield at the bottom left hand side of the face via a four pitch arête at about grade 17. This arête forms the side of a gut which can often be choked with snow or have a waterfall running down it. From the top of this arête head right up a narrow ledge which can have snow on it. This ledge takes you into the middle of the face and into a corner topped by a small roof. A good crack system takes you around the roof and then up into open country. There is a sting in the tail to this route in the form of a small overlap which is the crux. A piton driven in upside down protected the moves through this overlap, but small cams would probably be better. Two more technical pitches follow and then the face finishes at the summit after a section of scrambling on loose but not horrific rock.
3
A Stitch in Time
Grade 5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1. 40m From the snowfield in the middle of the face climb up to a fixed anchor (red tape).
2. 30m Step right and up 30m, then angle back left 10m to fixed belay.
3. 50m Up 40m to fixed pin, may be difficult to find, then up left to fixed belay
4. 45m Up 2–3m then veer right up seam to fixed belay.
5. 45m Up to fixed belay.
6. 45m Traverse 8m right along ledge then up to natural belay under roof.
7. 45m Step out right onto slab then up 8m to fixed piton. Keep tending right to broad ramp. Follow this left to large ledge and natural belay. Abseil cord is to your right.
8. 51m Belay 10m left of abseil sling. Follow obvious crack with a small grass patch and through right facing corner.
9. 45m Traverse left finding line of least resistance through broken rock to natural belay. The abseil sling is to your right.
10. 20m Tend up and right 15m to abseil cord and walk left 20m to summit.
4
WICKED
Grade 0
370m
-
Summer of Yes
Grade 0
190m Excellent four pitch route. The top two pitches follow the big corner. Bolted belays to rap off.
4
WICKED
Grade 0
370m
-
South West Ridge
Grade 0
5 pitches

Showing all routes 1 route total 2150 m

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tba

Attribution: Allan Uren & John Cocks

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Direct from the Wilkin Valley floor.
Grade 0

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2360 m

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Siberia, Newland, Te Naihi

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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South West Face
Grade 2
From Newland Pass at the head of Newland Stream, cross the Axius Glacier and climb the short, steep face to gain the summit ridge.
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East Ridge.
Grade 2
Take the well formed track up to the Crucible, a spectacular hanging lake under the south-east face. From the lake outlet there are gullies that lead up to the ridge, after which there is a snowfield and straightforward ridge to the top. This route has had few ascents.
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South East Face.
Grade 2
The best time to climb this face would be in winter or early spring. This would mean fast access to the face across a frozen lake. Good judgement regarding conditions would be vital for this face. It is avalanche prone and there is a high rockfall hazard if temperatures are too warm. The route goes up the left hand side of the face via a series of steep gullies.
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North Face.
Grade 2
Gain ledges below the East Ridge and traverse to reach a snowfield and the foot of a rib leading to the middle peak.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2265 m

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‘Is it a new sauce invented to make rabbit stew more palatable?’ mused Mr Explorer Charlie Douglas back in 1891. Ingenious but wrong, the name in fact refers to a distinctively shaped German helmet.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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North East Ridge.
Grade 2
Follow the ridge up from Pearson Saddle, for a time sidling on the Matukituki side until the ridge can be regained by a steep rock couloir. A mixed snow and rock ridge then leads up to the summit rocks with a final steep snow slope below the peak. The climb would probably take about five hours from the saddle. The North East ridge could also be reached by the subsidiary ridge rising from the Wilkin-East Matukituki saddle.
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North West Ridge.
Grade 2
The North West Ridge may be reached from Pearson Saddle by climbing scree and snow slopes to reach the ridge between Pickelhaube and the unnamed peak to the west. Although the ridge does not appear to have been climbed, it looks a straightforward rock ridge and would probably take about five hours from Pearson Saddle. The ridge could also be reached without difficulty from the Volta Névé.
-
South East Ridge
Grade 2

Showing all routes 1 route total 2009 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Waterfall Flat
Grade 2
Climb to the prominent spur (exposed in parts) at the north end of Waterfall Flat, then cross the basin above to gain the northern slopes of Taurus.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2254 m

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The first ascent of Ragan was from the Waiatoto, via Razorback Ridge and across Stocking Peak by Charlie Douglas, February 1891.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Standard Route
Grade 1
Climb to Chasm Pass, then along the Main Divide to summit. ➠ Note: The grade given here is tentative as the route is seldom used.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2536 m

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Rf mt%20pollux%20from%20near fmt

Pollux is a fine mountain; the vertical relief is reminiscent of the Darran mountains. Top Forks Hut makes a great base, but may mean a long day and bivvying near the base of the mountain may be preferable.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks. Photo Rob Frost.

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Chasm Pass Route.
Grade 2
Climb to Chasm Pass and then cross the Ice King Tops and Donald Glacier to join the Bluffs route to the summit. The route of the first ascent, but rather long and indirect.
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Bluffs route.
Grade 2
This is the preferred route. From Top Forks Hut, take the track up the valley towards Lake Castalia and pick a line through alpine scrub up the ridge you can see from the hut and down from the lake. If time is taken and good route finding adhered to, the worst of the alpine scrub can be avoided. There is a steep gully to be negotiated before the glacier is reached from where the climbing is straightforward to the summit.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2518 m

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This fine, rarely climbed peak just to the north of Pollux offers better climbing than its neighbour.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Pickelhaube Glacier route.
Grade 2
Follow the Bluffs route on Pollux and traverse below Pollux into the Pickelhaube Glacier. From there the South West Face is straightforward.
-
East Ridge.
Grade 2.25
From the top of the moraine wall between Lake Lucidus and the North Wilkin, pick a line through the bluffs to gain a shelf that leads out to the lower East Ridge. Follow the ridge to the summit.
-
South East Face.
Grade 2.25
Gain the glacier above Lake Lucidus via the Bluffs route on Pollux. The route follows a prominent rock rib which merges into the snow of the face proper.
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North West Ridge and Pickelhaube Glacier.
Grade 2
From the Drake River sidle up the valley draining the Pickelhaube Glacier, to above bushline. Cut left up a scrub and tussock rib to slabs under Pegasus and follow benches to the Pickelhaube Glacier. Choose a route to suit up the last steeper bit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2154 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

-
Traverse from Mercury.
Grade 0

Showing all routes 1 route total 2160 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Lake Castalia Cirque
Grade 0
Climb out of the Lake Castalia Cirque, normally via Leda Peak route, and traverse upper snow slopes.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1946 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Lake Castalia
Grade 0
Climb slopes above Lake Castalia to saddle with Wonderland Valley. See Moir’s Guide North, page 151.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1946 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Normal Route
Grade 1
Usually climbed as part of a traverse of the Main Divide from either Newland Pass or Lake Castalia.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1890 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Main Divide
Grade 0
Straightforward from Newland Pass, or along the Main Divide from The Sentinel.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2068 m

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A ‘pleasant scramble’ along the crest of the range between the Mueller and Te Naihi Rivers. T Barcham & A Cunningham, Dec 1950.

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Stewart Pass
Grade 0
Can be climbed from Stewart Pass at the head of the south branch of Siberia Stream. Although access is possible via Stewart Pass, it is much more difficult than the climb itself. The South Siberia slopes of the pass are steep slabs and bluffs and gully draining it is prone to rockfall.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2030 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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High Peak
Grade 0
The high peak in the centre is climbed via the ridge from the Siberia Valley. There are extensive slabs on this ridge.
-
South Peak
Grade 0
The south peak has been climbed by traversing from the centre peak.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1980 m

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tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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Normal Route
Grade 0
Straightforward from Siberia Saddle.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2010 m

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Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From Governor’s Pass
Grade 0
Climbed from Governor’s Pass at the head of the North Young.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2430 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

tba

Attribution: Allen Uren & John Cocks

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From the Wilkin
Grade 2
Approached from North Wilkin (as with Bluffs Route) and climbed from the col between it and Pollux.