Fetched from ClimbNZ on Aug 25th, 2017

Showing all routes 82 routes total

Alpine - 81 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2.75 3+
Trad - 1 route - avg. grade 15 0 - 16

Has NZ's tallest mountains

Showing all routes 48 routes total 3724 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Alpine - 48 routes - avg. grade 5 0 - 2.75 3+
Whack%2520n%2520dangle%2cnov%25202011%2cclaytons%2520photos%2520009

New Zealand’s highest mountain.

Attribution: Alex Palman Photo by Clayton Garbes

Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2.75 3+

Appprox 1 km south of the high peak

Attribution: Alex Palman

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 5 0 - 2.75 3+

Many variations exist on this 1600m high face. The routes are long sustained ice climbs and can involve high objective danger from rockfall. In 1991 a major rock avalanche swept down the face below High Peak, lowering its height by 10m. The debris jetted across the Plateau, spewed down the Hochstetter Icefall, across the Tasman Glacier and slightly up the moraine wall on the other side of the Tasman Valley.

Attribution: Alex Palman

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Great Gully
Grade 5
A prominent route parallel to the East Ridge. A right side variant of the Atkinson/Hall line exists, finishing on Middle Peak. Sveticic Slavko Miroslav, Mar 1990.
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Rumblestiltzskin
Grade 6
Follows a prominent gully up through the rock buttress in a direct fall line from Middle Peak. Approach via the snow field under the Atkinson/Hall route, and then traverse right beneath the rock buttress. The gully involves steep climbing. At the top of the gully there's a natural exit (hidden from view) out to a short snow slope. Follow it's left edge to a final rock wall just right of the Middle Peak apex (where this climb temporarily joined Boogie til you Puke), but then ice formations should lead up through the rock - traversing you out leftwards to finish on the rib immediately left of Middle Peak. If there is no ice use the rock (grade 17) finish of the aforementioned route or come up with another solution. The first ascent took 3 winter bivvys.
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Boogie 'Til You Puke
Grade 6
Ascend mixed ground of icefields and rock ribs between the large gully on the left of the face and the Jones Route. The rock crux is at the top.
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Jones Route
Grade 4.25
From the shelf head 900m up the left edge of the large snowface on the right of the face. Then out on a ramp leading left and up, joining the summit ridge just north of the Middle Peak. A variation heads straight up avoiding the ramp.
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High Peak Route
Grade 0

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Hooker Face
Grade 4.25
Ascend a rock rib directly below the Middle Peak which leads to steep snowfields between the prominent icecliff under Porter Col and the icecliff on the Hooker Face.
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Porter Col Route
Grade 3
From the Upper Empress Shelf, ascend snowslopes and gain a short steep gully to the right of a large icecliff which leads to the col between the Middle and Low Peaks. This is a regular descent route (but often requires abseils on the first steep section). There is usually a schrund just above the col beneath the Middle Peak which is suitable for bivouacs (‘Middle Peak Hotel’, was the scene of Mark Inglis and Phil Doole’s epic fortnight survival in 1982).
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East Ridge
Grade 4
A classic ice climb, perhaps the finest in New Zealand. The East Ridge joins Aoraki’s summit ridge about 200m south of Middle Peak. The lower section of the ridge can be gained at a number of points. The conventional routes are: i) From Cinerama Col, avoid the first 200m via the Plateau side, then head up slopes to gain the ridge. Follow the arête on up. ii) Via the shelf below the East Face gain a snow ramp leading out left onto the ridge below a rock step before a prominent level section on the ridge (This section can be gained directly from the shelf). Beyond the level section, follow up the winding arête that merges into the upper Caroline Face and finishes near the Middle Peak. Ice on the upper section of the route is often hard.

Showing all routes 20 routes total 3593 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Alpine - 20 routes - avg. grade 5 3+

Approx 1.5 km south of the high peak

Attribution: Alex Palamn

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North West Couloir
Grade 3
This is a general term for a number of routes leading from the Lower Empress Shelf onto the West Ridge. The most regular routes are up either the narrow or the broad couloir in the NW Buttress, and then up a broad gully or the rocks further left to gain the West Ridge at about 3200m where it flattens out. A commonly used descent route – but beware of rockfall in the lower part of the couloir – scene of a number of fatalities.
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West Ridge
Grade 3.25
Commencing either at the foot of main West Ridge above Gardiner Hut, or gaining the ridge at certain points on the northern side, follow up on good rock. From Gardiner Hut the ridge is a long climb. The strata lead onto the South Face, so tend left until the ridge flattens at 3200m.
Alpine - 14 routes - avg. grade 5 3+
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The South Face of Aoraki/ Mt Cook, generally starting on or above the Noeline Glacier.

Access: From the old Gardiner Hut site via Noeline or Upper shelf

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The Creamer
Grade 4.25
200m left of Sweet Dreams.
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Sweet Dreams
Grade 5
Ascend two rope lengths up Wet Dreams and then head left up an ice smear to broken ground onto the West Ridge.
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Wet Dream
Grade 4.75
Start up a prominent gully 100m left of White Dream. The route follows a narrow gully/ramp which angles back to connect up with White Dream. In places it narrows to one metre in width. Mostly 50 degree angle but a few sections are steeper. The next section on rock and water ice can be hard to follow. The final third of the route follows a prominent gully that joins White Dream near to where the NW Couloir joins. Harder variations have been done that traverse around very steep rock to reach the slope below the ice-cliff of White Dreams.
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White Dream
Grade 5
Commencing from the shelf above the Noeline Glacier, the route takes the easiest line up the mixed ground on the left of the face, linking two ice pitches passing just left of the left-most icecliff (crux). Continue up the icefield above to where the rock of the West Ridge meets the ice of the same ridge. Variation start: begin left of the route, following moderate ice gullies for three pitches, Marty Beare, Steve Erickson, 1983.
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Kiwi-Sherpa Route
Grade 5
Climbs an ice runnel between White Dream and the Slovenian Route – .
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Slovenian Route
Grade 4.75
From the shelf, head directly up the slopes beneath the two major icecliffs on the left of the face, up through a short rock band and between the cliffs. Then move back left and directly up above the left icecliff either to the top of the West Ridge or tending right again to Low Peak.
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Original Route
Grade 4
From the prominent shelf gained from Gardiner Hut, climb up to the right across the face and then up beside the main rock rib on the right. Then gain the rib and ascend to the South Ridge below the final rock step.
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Direct Route
Grade 4.75
From the Noeline ascend 70 ice gully on the R of the main ice cliffs and left of Gates of Steel, then directly up turning the first prominent icecliffs on the left and the next cliffs on the R. Not the safest line.
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The Gates of Steel
Grade 5
Ascend the buttress right of the centre of the face, weave through icecliffs and then up the face to the South Ridge. The buttress is reportedly fairly safe but the rock is of mixed quality.
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David and Goliath
Grade 5
The prominent ice gully right of Route 2.73. 600 metres of good ice. Finishes at the top of the rock buttress of Gates of Steel, left of the big icecliff.
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Nerve Runner
Grade 5.25
Ascend the ice gully on the right side of the face, just right of the Starting on the buttress immediately right of David and Goliath. Fifteen pitches straight up mixed ground with steep ice runnels. Good rock pro. Exit 200 metres left of Romeo and Juliet through icecliffs. Aptly named.
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Romeo and Juliet
Grade 5
Ascend the ice gully on the right side of the face, just right of the prominent icecliff and exit onto the South Ridge.
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Sodom and Gomorrah
Grade 5.25
Start up Romeo and Juliet, then continue up a ramp 100 metres towards the South Ridge, then straight up for five rope lengths to small snowfield to exit below the third step on the South Ridge.
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Pounamu
Grade 5.25
13 pitches on R of face to join Hillary Ridge (South Ridge) just below the second step.
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South (Hillary) Ridge
Grade 3.75
Formerly known as the South Ridge, renamed in honour of Sir Ed (who was part of the first ascent party) in August 2011. From the Noeline Glacier ascend to Endeavour Col (beware of rockfall – an alternative approach lies over Nazomi). Then ascend both the first and second steps on the east side. The third, crux step can be climbed direct. The rock is generally very loose. Then follow a classic arête to the summit.
C70 32 33

The last face to be climbed on the Aoraki/Mt Cook Massif. A Korean party may have climbed a route right (!) of the Clit Route but details are lacking.

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Denz Route
Grade 5
Follow the Clit Route to the shelf, then head across the shelf and ascend gullies and snowfields l000m to the Low Peak, meeting the South Ridge 40m below the summit.
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Clit Route
Grade 5
From the Caroline Glacier ascend an avalanche fan to gain the left side of three rock ribs that lead onto the large shelf. Above here follow the obvious arête up to the major icecliffs cutting across the face. Depending on their condition the cliffs can be the technical crux of the climb. Above here continue up a broad rib onto the summit icefields and head directly up the icefields to Porter Col if the icefields are in poor condition.
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A step to the left
Grade 4.25
Climb the snow rib right of the Clit Route (from the CR or from the Caroline Glacier directly). Miroslav variation continue to join the East Ridge. The FA of this route started from Pioneer Hut, to Plateau via Pioneer Pass through Cinema Col.

Showing all routes 7 routes total

Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 5 3+
Img 0421 sheila 1

Sheila or Northwest Face of Aoraki/ Mt Cook

Access: Hooker Glacier: http://climbnz.org.nz/nz/si/aoraki/hooker-glacier

Attribution: Photo: Steve Fortune Topo: Simon Middlemass

LH
Left Buttress
Grade 5
From the foot of Fyfe’s Gut ascend the rib to the left of a wide gully via a corner (crux 14). Ascend towards Fyfe’s Gut and then follow the west of the buttress until reaching a leftward traverse across a steep wall. Then follow red slabs and possible ice leads to the North Ridge 150m from the summit.
CBS
Central Buttress, Standard Route
Grade 4.75
The standard route begins close to the base of Fyfe’s Gut. Two grade 12 pitches take you onto the buttress which is followed on relatively easy, occasionally loose rock. The rib is wide and there are a number of alternatives. 200m below the summit, the rib meets a 50m flat ridge. Above here follow either the buttress of good rock, or if iced, move left into a couloir to reach the summit.
HV
Hi Viz
Grade 5.25
Gully line between the Central Buttress (original line) and the Sorensen/Allen line aka Grand Central Pillar. (CBV). Involved a bivy at the base of the headwall
CBV
Central Buttress, Variation
Grade 4.75
Variations exist at the base of the Central Buttress, starting further right from the standard route and joining it 300m higher. Some grade 14 and harder rock pitches have been reported. Tobin Sorenson and John Allen climbed a variation to the right of the Central Buttress in August 1979.
GR
Gully Route
Grade 5
The major gully between the Central Buttress and Right Buttress/Earles Route. Is usually well iced in winter.
RHB
Right Buttress
Grade 4.75
Follow the left crest of the buttress with a final pitch of grade 16, before joining Earle’s Route. The first ascent tended out on the face on the right, with easier climbing.
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Earle’s Route
Grade 3.75
Gain the ridge via the icefall on the left side of the Upper Empress Shelf. An alternative route is through a gap at the head of the Sheila Glacier but it involves a pitch of steep climbing. Follow the ill-defined ridge on poor rock. At about 3200m the ridge flattens out before meeting the final headwall. Depending on how iced the rocks are, either climb up steep ice gullies directly above or traverse left and use the Sheila Face exits, or even further left to the top of the North Ridge. The route faces north-west and hence can often be iced, making it a more serious undertaking than if the rock is clean.

Showing all routes 4 routes total

A series of routes commencing from the Upper Empress Shelf.

Access: To get onto the Upper Empress Shelf climb the glacier/icefall at the northern end where it descends to the Lower Empress Shelf, adjacent to Earle’s Ridge. This route usually becomes impassable from January onward. As an alternative, use “Earle’s Gap”. This is the low point on the lower Earle’s Ridge. From the upper Sheila Glacier climb a snow tongue (and possibly a pitch of rock) onto Earle’s Ridge – above the gap. Once on the ridge it is usually necessary to climb along the ridge for a pitch or more to avoid the large glacial holes on the southern side.

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Couloir to the right of Earle’s Route
Grade 4.25
Ascend the couloir to the right of Earle’s Route and through gullies on rock to the left of the main face to reach the summit ridge near the High Peak. Beware of rockfall in the gully.
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Right Hand Buttresses
Grade 0
Two buttresses to the right of the gully were ascended by R Coombs and K Henshall, and B Dawkins and S Thompson in Dec 1969, but the first ascent of the, "Couloir to the right of Earle’s Route" which has been climbed a number of times, is unrecorded.
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Standard Route
Grade 4.25
Up a short steep gully onto a sustained iceshield, often of hard ice, which leads to the summit ridge. First ascent party unknown.
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Right Hand Couloir
Grade 4
Via a short couloir and then either up good rock on the ribs to left or right (the standard Hooker Face route) or up the broad gully between the ribs.
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Aoraki/Mount Cook Grand Traverse
Grade 3.75
A ‘GT’ involves traversing Low, Middle and High Peaks (or vice versa) of Aoraki/Mt Cook. The section from Low Peak to Porter Col involves some rock, whereas the rest of the traverse is ice (and this can be hard, especially in winter). The ridge line from Low to High Peak is New Zealand’s highest and most exposed mile providing the most spectacular and famous traverse in the Southern Alps. In its day it was regarded as one of the most impressive achievements in world mountaineering.
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Zurbriggen Ridge
Grade 3.25
A classic Mt Cook climb. Ascend snow slopes on the edge of the East Face to gain the ridge 400m up, then up a rock step of poor rock (in certain conditions this can be sidled on the East Face). Above here follow snow slopes and the occasional rock pitch to gain the Summit Rocks where the standard Linda Glacier route is joined. Then ascend the north-east arête (commonly referred to as the ‘ice cap’) to the summit. The first three pitches of this route are the steepest, after which it relents a little.
E
Endeavour
Grade 5.75
460m The arête left of Resolution. A long series of arête pitches on great rock.
R
Resolution
Grade 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1. 30m Up hanging corner to small alcove of dark rock.
2. 30m Work up red wall and arete to climb hanging corner on right to big ledge. (Pitches 1 and 2 could be combined.)
3. 60m Climb right hand corner then continue up ledges and walls left of the main corner
4. 50m Slabs and walls of pink rock left of the corner. Belay near the arete below a steep wall.
5. 30m Traverse up and right towards corner. Climb overhang into groove left of main corner (which is blocked by loose flakes).
6. 60m Up easy ground then left below roof in main corner into subsidiary corner (snow). Weave up pink wall (~20m) with cracks to cross arete and make slopey traverse back to main corner. Belay off hand and fist size cams.
7. 90m Up nice corner, then long chimney; finally scramble to belay below steepening in corner. (There are potential belays in this pitch but they are not very sheltered.)
8. 30m Climb corner (or wall on right—corner may be wet) to awkward belay below next overhang. Piton high on left. (This belay is dry but the ropes will get wet—best to combine pitches 8 and 9 to get past wet section.)
9. 30m The Waterfall pitch—climb overhang using chockstones and continue up corner and right wall to a stance on the left.
10. 30m Up corner to gain obvious diagonal weakness heading up across right wall. Belay on flake/pedestal below smooth, steep wall with cracks heading diagonally up left and right. (Pitches 10 and 11 could be combined.)
PD
Pink Dream
Grade 6
500m Takes the arete R of Resolution on excellent rock.
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Bowie Couloir
Grade 3.75
Climb the prominent gully between the Bowie and Zurbriggen Ridges, following the right variation couloir at the top. Involves steep gully climbing and some rockfall danger.
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Bowie Ridge
Grade 4, 4
1. The Lower Buttress can be climbed either from its toe in the Linda Glacier or just above Teichelmann’s Corner (where the Linda turns towards Aoraki).
2. The Upper Buttress can be approached from either the upper Linda Glacier or from a subsidiary glacier between Zurbriggen and Bowie ridges and up a gully. The upper buttress has about nine pitches, consistently angled (crux 14), of good rock. Then traverse a ridge with gendarmes and some loose rock to join the top of Zurbriggen Ridge at the upper Linda shelf.
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Linda Glacier
Grade 3
While this is the easiest and most climbed route on Aoraki/Mount Cook, it is also one of the most dangerous, being menaced by icecliffs. The lower glacier is often heavily crevassed and there is considerable danger from ice avalanches off the right (Divide) slopes. At the head of the glacier under the Gunbarrel (the prominent and active icecliffs of the Upper Linda), traverse left very quickly across the Linda Shelf to join Zurbriggen Ridge below the Summit Rocks (these provide access to the summit, which is over 400m above). A 150m gully that runs directly from the Linda Shelf to the start of the Summit Rocks is a popular alternative to traversing to the Zurbriggen junction. Climb the rocks - there is usually a series of ice gullies running up through the rocks which make for easier climbing. Late in the season parties may need to venture further toward the East Face. Once above the Summit Rocks follow the north-east ice cap to the summit. The easiest way to get onto the summit ridge is to traverse to the west, overlooking the North Ridge and Sheila Face, and climb a short step to follow a sustrugi filled ramp that leads to the top. Due to the 1991 avalanche the very top is probably not a smart place to stand and climbers are asked to respect the wishes of Ngai Tahu by not standing on the very top. The Linda Glacier is the most common descent route from Aoraki/Mount Cook. Most parties use two abseils (100m) when descending the Summit Rocks. As a result there can be a ‘Christmas tree’ of abandoned slings and other assorted anchors in the rock and ice. Check these thoroughly before using them for abseiling. There have been numerous falls on this part of the route. As a general rule, ascents of the ‘Linda’ take anywhere from 15-18hrs or more depending on conditions and the speed of the party. It’s a big day out in any language. To make sure it’s one to remember: get fit, plan, prepare and practice. If there are many parties intending to do the Linda (or Zurbriggen) - try to avoid a Summit Rocks bottleneck – and don’t forget your camera. A flat section on the Bowie Ridge above Teichelmann’s Corner, accessible from the Linda Glacier, provides a relatively safe bivvy spot. There is also a schrund, uphill of the Linda Shelf, which has been used for shelter.
NR
North Ridge
Grade 4
From the upper Sheila Glacier head up the rib to the left of Fyfe’s Gut - the narrow couloir directly below the saddle. It is possible to climb Fyfe’s Gut but watch for dangerous stonefall. The route comes out above Green Saddle. Then up three prominent steps on the North ridge, the last and more difficult ‘Beare Step’ being turned via either a steep hand traverse or an abseil into a couloir on the Sheila Face. It is also possible to bypass the 'Beare direct' by a rock variation on the face to the left at about Grade 14 (Whimp/Tweedie). A classic route used for the first ascent of Aoraki/Mt Cook. It was descended by at least four parties on early ascents but this is not recommended. Green Saddle can also be accessed from the Grand Plateau: Ascend to Green Saddle from the Linda Glacier (schrunds can be problem late in the season). First ascended from the Linda Glacier by Harry Ayres, Oscar Coberger, Dec 1951.

Showing all routes 22 routes total 2925 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Alpine - 22 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2.75 3+

South of Aoraki

Attribution: Alex Palman

Showing all routes 11 routes total

Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 4 0 - 2.75 3+
Nazomi topoCarolonroute 0

Mainly rock routes above the Noeline Glacier.

Attribution: Alex Palman

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Castle - McDermott
Grade 4
The first two pitches climbed were in the corner just left of the buttress, they then moved right onto slabs between the corner and the buttress traversing r to cross the roofs that are left of the prow.
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Xmas Sausage: Terminator Variant
Grade 4
Head up the Terminator and then straight up the slabby buttress above
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Terminator
Grade 4.25
Start climbing up the prow of the buttress, then continue up the slabby buttress above keeping well right of the corner. Move right to climb roofs R of the prow. Twelve pitches of excellent sustained rockclimbing (crux 18, also pitches of 16).
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Gledhill Route
Grade 4
Start right of the prow of the prominent buttress. Easy angled climbing leads up right into a corner and deep ugly gully. A crux near the top of the gully (two possible options, both grade 17) is followed by 200m of scrambling to the summit.
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Tom and Bill
Grade 3.25
On the buttress rib right of the Gledhill and Terminator, (crux 14, but might be harder), limited protection.
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Variant
Grade 3.25
Starts 70m right of the Gledhill line near a waterfall. Climb face to overhang, then up groove and steep gully, and follow a rib to the top. Excellent rock, (possibly involves th Ton & Bill Route).
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Noeline Couloir
Grade 2
Ascend the couloir and rock steps between the two summits. This is a standard ascent and descent route. There are a considerable number of variations, especially to the left of the couloir.
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Du Faur Ridge
Grade 0
The southern wall of the Noeline Glacier can be gained at various points and although the upper portion has been climbed often, the ridge does not appear to have been climbed in its entirety. Excellent rock buttresses are found on the lower ridge.
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Tim Jefferson Memorial Route
Grade 3
The obvious buttress clearly visible from Gardiner Hut on the western end of the West Ridge of Nazomi. Climb the north side of the buttress using the obvious left facing corner for three pitches, turning two large roofs on the left. Move onto broken slabs of the west face through an overhanging ‘V’ slot on the NW ridge (crux 16). Easy scrambling along the ridge then leads to a point above a large snow slope leading down the north side to the Noeline Glacier descent route.
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White-Vervoorn Buttress
Grade 4
Gain the buttress from the Hooker Glacier below the Hooker Icefall 300m of hard climbing on excellent rock (crux 15), which is reportedly far better than the McInnes Ridge, that leads to lesser angled rock which a confident party can climb unroped. To descend, walk off the top of the second buttress down the Noeline Glacier.
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MacInnes Ridge
Grade 4
Starting from the lower Hooker Glacier beside the stream from the Mona Glacier, climb the first buttress, then onto the second buttress of good rock (with a 50m cheval) and up to the “Gnome”, from where a short descent leads onto a small glacier below the final wall. An escape route exists to the left round to Gardiner Hut. Otherwise straight up variable rock to the summit ridge. This section can often be iced up.

Showing all routes 10 routes total

Alpine - 10 routes - avg. grade 5 3+
Pc100142 pixelNazomi%20sf%201.1 0Nazomi%20sf%201.2 0Nazomi%20sf%201.3

Approached from the Mona Glacier.

Attribution: Alex Palman. Topo's Simon Middlemass 2016

BDR
Ben Dare Route
Grade 4.75
450m Ben started out by heading up frozen snow from the schrund and then up steeper waterfall ice in a gully on the right. The first 15-metre high step of over 85-degree ice was the crux of the 450-metre face, which alternated between ‘short ice steps’ and snow, leading up to steeper mixed terrain before hitting the ridgeline. Another 150 metres along the ridgeline allowed access to the summit
RIP
Runts in Paradise
Grade 4.75
Gullies left of the Faintly French Route, with a snow slope to start. This route climbs ice to the left of the left rib and takes a left-hand variant gully at half height.
NC
No country for old men
Grade 5

FF
Faintly French
Grade 3.25
Climb the left rib, rock scrambling changing to steep climbing on an arête (crux 15) followed by easier broken rock 200m below the summit.
MRR
Major Runt Route
Grade 5
The obvious central couloir between the two major buttresses.
CWR
Cormack-Wilson Rib
Grade 3.25
Up the middle rib which steepens in the middle before reaching a shelf below the final 150m of poor rock.
AR
Andy's route
Grade 5

SS
Slightly Scottish
Grade 5.75
An ice climb up the couloir to right of Cormack-Wilson Rib. Sustained climbing through middle section with vertical and overhanging ice encountered. When first climbed there was pronounced rockfall
TTSB
The Turkey Strikes Back (Right Rib)
Grade 3.25
Third buttress right of the MacInness R. A rotten rock start leads to climbing on sound compact rock with sustained difficulties
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South Ridge
Grade 3
The start from the head of the Mona Glacier névé is steep and has been avoided by using couloirs on the west to emerge where the ridge flattens. A prominent tower 200m below the summit is turned on the east. The rock is variable. Descended in winter 1993 by Andy MacFarlane.
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East Face Routes
Grade 3
From the Ball Glacier gain the prominent shelf that runs below Nazomi and verges the Caroline Face by climbing 650m up a rib that starts from the Ball-Caroline glaciers junction. A number of routes exist from the shelf onto the crest of the Mt Aoraki/Cook Range: Bruce Gillies, Roland Rodda, Dec 1942.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2541 m

Mt Cook Range

Attribution: Alex Palman

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From Hooker Glacier
Grade 2.75
From Hooker Glacier ascend via the Mona Glacier onto either the West Ridge, North Face, or North Ridge (Divide). The rock on Pibrac is good at the bottom but deteriorates markedly towards the top.
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Via Ball Pass
Grade 0
North from Ball Pass over Turner Peak. The easiest routes are via Ball Pass either along the ridge or traversing around the Ball Glacier. This area was the scene of many ascents when guides were based at Ball Hut.
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JM Goes Tramping (South Face)
Grade 4
350m Up obvious snow gully leading left of summit. Then along straightforwardish ridge a few minutes to the summit. Easy access via Turner Peak or Proud Pass. Descent is less straightforward: either go down to Mona Glacier (Nazomi side, this is easy but presumably wont take you back to your tent) and then to Hooker Gl or on Tasman side (solar aspect, softens up quickly). The original ascentionist soloed down a somewhat easier line on the S Face but this was uncomfortably steep lower down and a rope would be recommended. The direct line to the summit would be somewhat harder but in good conditions would be a classic. Route named after the climber absconded from an Otago University Tramping Club trip over Ball Pass to link up solo ascents of Turner and Pibrac.
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The Shaft (West Face)
Grade 5
(WI3+)

Showing all routes 1 route total 2338 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

North of Ball Pass. Straightforward from most directions. Darby Thomson, Samuel Turner, Feb 1913. West Ridge: G Carr, K E Johnson, Jan 1965.

Attribution: Alex Palman

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Névé Névé Land (South Face)
Grade 3.25
250m More or less straight up the guts of the south face. Heaps of harder variants with WI3+ steps at the start are possible. Generally steep at first then onto 60 degree neve ramps with some small steps, 70-80 degrees max. First ascentionist exited right to top out about 15m from the summit. Climb when conditions are fat, rock gear would be nix. 2 mins access from Ball Pass easy snow descent off Turner towards Ball Gl then back right to Ball Pass.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2121 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Well trodden crossing from the Tasman to Hooker Glaciers.

Attribution: Alex Palman

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Hooker to Lower Tasman
Grade 1.25
From the East Hooker track. Follow the Hooker Valley track to the second swingbridge, don’t cross it – instead continue up the eastern side of the Hooker valley, following a vague track marked occasionally with cairns. This track follows vegetated moraine terraces to a large shingle fan opposite Hooker Hut. To the north-east of this fan there is an obvious gully, ascend this to a relatively flat area under Mt Mabel known as the ‘playing fields’. Continue up scree slopes to the east. These slopes snake upward between bluffs. Once above these slopes follow a ledge northward to the north-west ridge of Mt Mabel. This is the best route through the bluffs. Traversing northward again, cross rock slabs and descend around the ridge, west of Mt Rosa. Beyond Mt Rosa continue in a north-easterly direction across scree slopes to Ball Pass. Ball Pass to Caroline Hut. Below the pass, descend the Ball Glacier a short distance before gaining the Ball Ridge to the south. Continue down this to Caroline Hut (~1790m, privately owned and locked, although an emergency shelter with a radio exists). To get to Ball Shelter, follow the Ball Ridge below the hut. Difficult sections can be avoided on the eastern side. Follow cairns until the track turns to the east, where the route descends boulder scree and alpine scrub to the shelf that Ball Shelter (~1020m) resides on. Time: Village to Ball Shelter 8-10hrs, usually completed as a full day trip.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2161 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

South of Ball Pass. 1st ascent. R Moorhouse, E Studholme 1895.

Attribution: Alex Palman

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From Husky Flat
Grade 0
Can all be climbed easily from the Tasman Valley. Mts Mabel and Rosa provide pleasant climbing up the valley above Husky Flat, but beware of avalanches in spring and early summer.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2083 m

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1st ascent, Peter Graham, Henrik Sillem, Feb 1906.

Attribution: Alex Palman

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From Husky Flat
Grade 0
Can all be climbed easily from the Tasman Valley. Mts Mabel and Rosa provide pleasant climbing up the valley above Husky Flat, but beware of avalanches in spring and early summer.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2058 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

1st Ascent. Thomas Brodrick, Louis Sladden, 1889. There are also some good winter gully climbs on Mt Wakefield, starting from near the second swingbridge.

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Guides Route
Grade 0
At least two of the ribs leading onto Wakefield from just above the second swingbridge were used as training climbs for guides in the 1930s. From the second swingbridge climb a very enjoyable ridge to the summit. The rock is good and the panoramic views including Sefton, the Main Divide and Aoraki are superb.
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From the Tasman road bridge
Grade 0
From the Tasman road bridge climb up the vegetated spur that eventually leads to the summit. This is an excellent day or overnight trip and could form the descent if the Guide Route (from the Hooker) is climbed. Panoramic views.
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WINTER WESTERN GULLY
Grade 0

682557
The Old Man And The Scree
Grade 15
120m a slab / chimney affair up the lookers left side of the buttress separating the "hidden gulley"from main scree. walk off the back.