Alpine - 27 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: Hunters Hut to Adams Flat via the Lambert Tops Follow the route above to the saddle at I35 259681, then descend to the south and turn west towards Aciphylla Creek. The ridge on the true left of this stream gives good access down to the basin in Aciphylla. (There is a rock bivvy up another branch of Aciphylla at I35 250669). The reason for the name Aciphylla becomes apparent as you continue west out of Aciphylla to the ridge at I35 231673. From there, sidle left into a thin gravel creekbed leading through the scrub. This creek is shown on the map. A fall lower down this creek can be sidled on the true right. From Aciphylla to the Flat is an energetic mix of gravel and steep scrub, but not too bad. Time. From the basin south east of pt 1443m to Adams Flat, allow about 5 hrs. Hunters Hut to Adams Flat via Adams River The track up the Adams River has all but gone and the above route is much the preferable. From the Lambert Bridge, follow the track across the terrace to the Lambert Tops junction. The maintained DOC track continues to the Adams Riverbed near the Adams Lambert Forks. The old permolat line upvalley leaves it and continues across the terrace until directly above the forks of the Adams and the first tributary on the true right I34 268727. Here the permolat leaves the terrace and descends very steep slopes down to the stream/river junction. A slip here means that markers on the way down have been obliterated, but the ground trail remains useable with care, swinging to the left lower down and finishing at the bottom corner of the forks. Alternatively, it is necessary to go almost a km along the terrace before it is practical to descend gravel cliffs along the stream bank. From the forks follow old permolat steeply up the spur between the stream and the river and sidle on terraces under the 400m contour upvalley in varying bush to return to the river at about I34 250717. (Permolat is likely to be lost on the way, and isnt really worth persisting with). Mostly good river travel on the true right now leads to I34 242712. Above here, bush sidling leads upvalley, and varies in its tediousness. There is a bluff overhang in the bush at the 490m contour I35 238697 that is dry (sleeps 4). Above here, the terrain gets more gnarly, the creeks more incised, that sort of thing. It's all doable, but persistence and care is needed. Generally stay about 100m above the river, except at I35 236686, where it works to cross a stream below forks and climb steeply out upvalley on a spur. Sidle 100m up again before heading for the bottom of the flats. You will truely think you are in Shangri La when you get to Adams Flat and see so much flat land and open going again. Times: Hunters Hut to Adams Flat, allow at least 2 good days. Adams Flat to Arethusa Glacier and Garden of Eden via Alpheus Creek First a little naming history. Although the Adams was named after CW Adams a surveyor from the 1880s rather than Adam and Eve that hasnt stopped some inspired cross naming to go on, from the Garden of Eden itself, to Arethusa, a maiden of Greek mythology pursued to the depths by dark Alpheus. Then there is the Eblis Gorge just below Adams Flats, named by Pascoe after a monarch of the 'spirits of evil' who refused to worship Adam. In one early work Eblis was described as, 'tarnished by malignant vapours and caused the powers of the abyss to tremble'. You wouldnt want to be next to him in a closed tent after a bad feed. The route itself begins up the boulderbed of Alpheus Creek then swings left up towards pt 1680m. The route is both steep and complex higher up. Note that the labelled 1100m contour in Alpheus Creek on I35 is actually 1200m. Head up the true right of Alpheus Creek. Sidle in scrub behind two separate boulders enroute, then further up another short sidle ascends gravel and crosses over a rib through scrub under a boulder back to Alpheus at I35 214664, about 100m upvalley from the sidestream marked on I35. This next gully has a big boulder about 50m up it on the true left. Leave Alpheus and head up this gully. A small fall a short distance up needs to be climbed and bedrock here is eroding. Packs will need to be lifted up separately. (easy enough). Continue on easier gravel in the stream above to 1130m altitude. Climb out here on the true right following tussock leads in dracophyllum scrub up towards a rib for about 100m before sidling across to the next stream (downvalley) at 1225m altitude. This stream drops away steeply below, but offers reasonable travel in dry conditions uphill on bedrock. Continue up to 1330m and climb out again on the true right up a shallow gully of tussock that leads up to a less steep bouldery tussock rib. Sidle/climb across to the main ridge overlooking Arethusa at about 1540m, I35 213655. Some of this is smooth bedrock, but there are routes through. Sidle/descend to the glacier, being careful to pick a line that will work through onto the ice. That may mean looking further up the ridge. Time: about 5 hrs up and 3.5 hrs down. First used as a route (descending) by W (Bill) Hannah, Ray Chapman, A Hemmingsen, H McDowall, 30th Dec 1948

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 27 routes total

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Alpine - 27 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: Named by Pascoe after the maidenly Arethusa of Greek mythology, who was challenged by the darker Alpheus. Alpheus Creek drains a deep trench to the north of the Arethusa. The Arethusa can be used as an approach from the Gardens to Mts Kensington, Hulka and Farrar. To ascend the glacier. From the gully west of pt 1636m (this rocky area was what Pascoe originally named Icefall Lookout) cross through the depression left by receeding ice and gain the Arethusa Glacier. Ice across the lower glacier can be quite broken later in the season and a route through may not be straight forward. Further up, the Arethusa has 2 icefalls. The lower icefall is more broken, and will usually need to be ascended by sidling up snow and rocky slopes on the true left of the glacier from about the 1640m contour. A route can usually be found through the slots in the upper icefall. From the neve at the 1940m contour, snowslopes to the south west lead either to Iceland Col, Hulka, or the big plateau at the head of the Farrar Glacier. Alternatively from the upper Arethusa, more direct approaches to the north and west can be used to approach Mt Kensington. See the Adams Valley for access from Adams Flat to the Arethusa Glacier.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 21 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+
P204

The Garden of Allah, and its continuation in the Lambert Snowfields extends for 8km. They overlap north and south of each other, and access between them is via Adams and Angel cols. Five rivers drain to the west from them and mountains on their fringes. Newton Pk at 2543m is highest in the area, followed by Mt Tyndall at 2517m and Mt Kensington at 2444m. Rock is generally greywacke grading into schist of variable quality. Travel on the Garden of Allah snowfield is generally straight forward, though crevassed areas reduce easy travel to obvious lines. The neve at the head, connecting easily with the Lambert over two wide saddles, is more extensive than it first appears from lower down. The Lambert neve itself remains a major snowfield, bounded by the Main Divide on one side and Mt Lambert on the other, split in the head by a ridge of reasonable greywacke rock. Travel down from Satans Saddle to pt 1967m is normally fine, but expect crevasses. The other branch, south of pt 2220m, also offers good travel and an alternative that can be linked back under the pt 2220m ridge to the Satans Saddle branch. To continue down the small icefall between 1700m and 1800m, the least crevassed slopes are over on the true right hand side of the main Lambert Glacier. Direct approaches to Lambert Col from here are normally easy. Continuing on down, the O'Neil Glacier can usually be approached from the lower Lambert below here without too much trouble, but it is seasonally variable. The ridge north of the Garden of Allah leading up to Mt Lambert has informally been referred to as Tenzing Ridge since the 1950s. Significant ice flanks the southern slopes, particularly under Mt Lambert itself. On the northern side of this ridge, there are some significant buttresses and, in places, promising rock at the head of Aciphylla Creek. Across the Lambert Glacier, slabs lead up to Mt Stoddart. The east face of Mt Stoddart is unclimbed as far as i know, but broken rock doesnt make it a particularly attractive looking proposition For over 70 years the area has been the focus of transalpine climbing parties, and it was an early one of these that provided the name. 'This neve area on part of the Adams Range was named the Garden of Eden', wrote John Pascoe in the 1935 New Zealand Alpine Journal (page 143) acknowledging in the The Canterbury Mountaineer 1934/1935 that AP Thomson in their party inspired the name. Routes through the area have often been as important as the climbing objectives, and this guide provides information on those routes as well as the climbing. Many of the climbs from the plateaus are relatively easy, but more challenging routes such as the buttresses on Newton Peak from the Garden of Allah exist

Access: The main access to the Gardens from the east is Perth Col via the Clyde Branch of the Rangitata River. This is the easiest overall access but is dependent on Clyde River conditions. The Clyde is often uncrossable, especially in spring with snowmelt. It has usually dropped to crossable levels by late Jan or Feb. From the west, there are two main approaches to the Gardens. One is via the Wanganui Valley and Lambert Spur, sidling to the Lambert Glacier. The other is via the Perth Branch of the Whataroa River. See the Whataroa and Wanganui Valleys amongst others for those access details.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75

This ridge extends west about 4km from Mt Lambert along the true right of the Garden of Allah, finishing above the Beelzebub icefall. The ridge was traversed from pt 2314m above Satans Saddle to pt 2278m on 1st Jan 1954.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Lambert 0P213

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the North
Grade 1.25
From the col under pt 1936m.From the col, climb through lower bluffs to gain the snowslopes of a tiny glacier. Head SSE up this and gain the final ridge just east of the summit.
ER
East Ridge
Grade 2
Gaining the ridge from the Lambert Neve is usually straight forward. In places the ridge is easy, while elsewhere, the ridge is interesting mixed climbing without being technically difficult.
SF
South Face
Grade 2.25
A moving feast, ice on this face is generally quite broken and travel threatened by seracs. Crevasses frequently cut access up the face as early as late spring. However, in good snow conditions, a route through can sometimes be found. If the south west ridge is gained before the summit, an anvil shaped gendarme forming the low peak can be bypassed.
SWR
South West Ridge
Grade 2.25
A mixed rock and snow ridge. No great difficulties, but care required in places on average rock. An anvil shaped gendarme forming the low peak can be bypassed.
P213 0

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SS
From Satans Saddle
Grade 1
From Satans Saddle, ascend crevassed snowslopes.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From 2314m
Grade 2.25
From 2314m, easy snow leads west to the top of a 20m rock step. From the col below, sidle then ascend snow slopes to the eastern (higher) summit. A second summit (10m lower) involves crossing a rock gap then ascending 40m of steep but firm rock. West off the lower summit involves a steep and exposed descent. This has been turned on the Aciphylla Creek side down a gut then across a sloping shelf before returning to the ridge. Beelzebub snow faces are then accessible, while further west there are towers on the ridge.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the Beelzebub
Grade 1.25
Can be approached from the Beelzebub up steep snow slopes then a rock scramble.
P204 0

Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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The Tears of Allah
Grade 3
500m This stunning 500m rock route rising from the Garden of Allah has great rock and pro on the roped pitches, is safe and easily rapped. Strongly recommended by the first ascentionists. The climb entails access via an apron on the RH side to a large ledge before a full pitch of superb 18. Above this a half pitch on easy ground leads to scrambling to the superb headwall pitches (16 & 18). A short step down to another wall not visible from below accesses the crux pitch of 21 (watch the loose blocks at the crux). Above this, stunning easy pitches (15 & 15) lead to a final scramble to the summit. To descend rap to the base of the crux pitch and scramble toward the easy side and down across easier ground continuing to the top of the first pitch and rap back to the ledge and down climb back to the snow.
GA
From Garden of Allah
Grade 1.25
Along John Pascoe Ridge from Mt Tyndall Grade 1+ Easy snow slopes provide access along the Main Divide from the upper Garden of Allah, bypassing Snowy Peak. From the col between Tyndall and Newton a snow ridge with a schrund and short scramble at the end leads to the summit. The schrund can cause parties problems and at times cut access.
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South Face.
Grade 2
A diagonal snow climb from the Garden of Eden up crevassed snowslopes that vary considerably and are often cut off later in the season. There are some big slots up here. Reach the ridge between Newton and Tyndall from which both peaks are accessible. The first ascent went all the way up the Colin Campbell Glacier from the Frances Valley to the Garden of Eden, then climbed the snowy south face of Tyndall before traversing to Newton Pk.
P204 1

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

GA
From the Garden of Allah
Grade 1.25
From about I35 252639, choose a route southeast up moderate snowslopes leading to the Main Divide a few hundred metres northeast of Mt Tyndall. Alternatively a longer, but easier, route approaches this same point from the Allah neve under Snowy Pk. Then cross easy snowslopes to a col west of Mt Tyndall. On southern slopes cross boulder scree then scramble up loose rock to the equally loose summit ridge, or alternatively follow moderate snowslopes part of the way slightly further east.
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South Face.
Grade 2
A diagonal snow climb from the Garden of Eden up crevassed snowslopes that vary considerably and are often cut off later in the season. There are some big slots up here. Reach the ridge between Newton and Tyndall from which both peaks are accessible.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the Garden of Allah.
Grade 1
Easy snow climb from the Garden of Allah.

Adams Col is at I35 227627, not the col marked at 2071m on some maps. Access to the col is easy from the Garden of Eden at any time. On a fine day there is no better place to be on the planet. It is commonly used as a base for climbing on the Gardens, and there are low rockwalled campsites on rocky outcrops on the eastern side. Dont be fooled though if arriving in fine calm weather. The sites may look secure, but many parties have been stormed out of here with ripped tents. Wind can surge through here at phenomenal speeds with ice riming the rock, and hail lashing the col. Take care with rubbish and toileting here

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Adams Col to Icefall Lookout
Grade 0
A small tongue of ice from the Garden of Eden flows through the col and peters out in a small basin. Below here, at about the 1860m contour, a series of rocky knolls lead to small bluffs with a series of gullies draining between them. The easiest route down doesnt follow the gully on the far true left (which normally requires confined rock moves if there isnt continuous snow) but instead goes down the gully to the immediate right of it. This gully is more open and all that is required is easy scrambling between the bluffs leading down to gentler scree slopes. From Adams Col, head down the snow basin and as it starts to drop off keep left under rockwalls on Guardian Peak. Near where it actually drops off, switch over the first rocky rib to the right and scramble down to an easy gully of scree and snowslopes below. You're down. In the reverse direction going up from near Icefall Lookout follow snowslopes towards the col then sidle slightly left (looking up) onto scree. Follow the scree up a gully through a break in the bluffs to the basin above and the col. Continuing to the Garden of Allah From the gentler snow slopes north of Adams Col at about the 1800m contour, follow down under bluffs swinging east across a snow and gravel basin past I35 226632. It is normal to descend to about the 1740m contour before gaining height again. Travel varies from snowslopes to gravel and a bit of easy bedrock, depending on conditions. Thirty years ago continuous gentle snowslopes filled this basin. Steeper snow leads up again to the snow shoulder south of pt 1874m. Watch for changing snow texture climbing up to this shoulder, as snow frequently thins here over summer to expose old ice. A good route sidles up to the left through the middle of the snowbank between two small rock bluffs onto the gentler slopes above. Alternatively stay over near the John Pascoe Ridge side.
P208 2

Guardian Peak has been climbed from about every ridge, angle and slope over the past 70 years.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the north.
Grade 2
Originally climbed utilising a snowslope to the NE.
SF
South Face
Grade 1.25
Directly up snowslopes from the Garden of Eden. Schrunds can be problematic at times.

In 1935 Pascoe's party camped near pt 1636m, not far from the Arethusa Glacier and called it Icefall Lookout. The present position marked at pt 1763m on map I35 first appeared in the 1970s with contoured inch to mile NZMS1 maps. There is now a large tarn near pt 1763m later in summer, a result of glacial recession. A knob of reasonable rock west of the currently marked Icefall Lookout offers a short rock climb from the south. From the north, (Lower Adams Glacier) it is quite an impressive horn of reasonable rock 400m high, and probably unclimbed

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Adams Col to Icefall Lookout
Grade 0
A small tongue of ice from the Garden of Eden flows through the col and peters out in a small basin. Below here, at about the 1860m contour, a series of rocky knolls lead to small bluffs with a series of gullies draining between them. The easiest route down doesnt follow the gully on the far true left (which normally requires confined rock moves if there isnt continuous snow) but instead goes down the gully to the immediate right of it. This gully is more open and all that is required is easy scrambling between the bluffs leading down to gentler scree slopes. From Adams Col, head down the snow basin and as it starts to drop off keep left under rockwalls on Guardian Peak. Near where it actually drops off, switch over the first rocky rib to the right and scramble down to an easy gully of scree and snowslopes below. You're down. In the reverse direction going up from near Icefall Lookout follow snowslopes towards the col then sidle slightly left (looking up) onto scree. Follow the scree up a gully through a break in the bluffs to the basin above and the col. Continuing to the Garden of Allah From the gentler snow slopes north of Adams Col at about the 1800m contour, follow down under bluffs swinging east across a snow and gravel basin past I35 226632. It is normal to descend to about the 1740m contour before gaining height again. Travel varies from snowslopes to gravel and a bit of easy bedrock, depending on conditions. Thirty years ago continuous gentle snowslopes filled this basin. Steeper snow leads up again to the snow shoulder south of pt 1874m. Watch for changing snow texture climbing up to this shoulder, as snow frequently thins here over summer to expose old ice. A good route sidles up to the left through the middle of the snowbank between two small rock bluffs onto the gentler slopes above. Alternatively stay over near the John Pascoe Ridge side. Continuing to the glacier draining Angel Col This is easily accessed from the snowslopes under (north of) Adams Col too. Much of this route in late summer crosses recently exposed rock ground smooth by past ice. The descent to the glacier itself is steeper but not normally difficult. It may be necessary to sidle south a little to find a gully down.
P215

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Access: The routes "From Lord Valley" & "NW Ridge, are sometimes combined as a pack route between the Lord Valley and the Lambert Glacier. Teichelmann used this route on the 6th Feb 1911 on his first ascent of Mt Tyndall. It is also practical to access the upper Mad Water from the basin north of Stoddart. From the basin, sidle around and down to a shelf with two tarns at 1300m and continue along it to where it finishes, overlooking the Mad Water. The steep gully beyond, shown as a tiny creek on the map, is not practical to descend from up here. Instead, descend a steep rock and tussock rib on the true left of it with care, sidling into the gravel gully about 60m height above the Mad Water and following it down. Some looking around may be necessary but it works with care. Travel up the Mad Water at stream level from here is ok, but downstream is a waterfalled canyon. Slopes to the east above the Lord can be approached from here.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NWR
North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
To access the ridge from the Lambert Glacier, sidle up onto the O Neil Glacier and gain the ridge along snow or rock leads at about the 1640m contour. Among the rocks on this ridge are the remains of an abandoned, partly pitched, K2 style tent that could probably tell quite a story. The ridge above is easy, gravel and snow with a bit of bedrock near the top.
LV
From the Lord Valley
Grade 1.25
Between the Madwater and the next stream downvalley, climb up through scrub heading south. Reach the scrubline at J35 313683, and head over a shoulder to the south into a basin at the 1400m contour. There are wonderful campsites in this basin and up on a terrace just above it to the west. Follow tussock and scree up to pt 1544m then climb the ridge, usually crossing at the 1900m contour to the rib overlooking the O'Neil Glacier for the final climb.
SR
South Ridge
Grade 2
From Gardarene Col. A schrund near Stoddart itself can be problematic.
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Hunters Hut to the Gardens via Lambert Spur
Grade 0
In good conditions this is the best approach to the Gardens from the Westland. However, part of it, particularly sidling under Mt Lambert has significant avalanche risk when there is fresh snow. There are superb grass campsites near 1443m, and others over at a gravel flat, I35 269677. From Hunters Hut take the track out to the Lambert riverbed, follow the boulders up and cross the Lambert bridge. A good track on the true left leads across a bush terrace before climbing up a spur to pt 1148m, a rocky viewpoint in the scrub. Almost a km further, leave the scrub behind and continue through long tussock into short grass and easier going above about 1450m. Below a small tarn at about I35 264694, there is no water on the ridge. From the knob at I35 265692, to get to the saddle at I35 259681, there are two options. Either descend to the wonderful camping basin south east of pt 1443m then continue to the basin below at I35 256689 before climbing up to the saddle, or sidle across from the small col south of the knob, sidling slowly up to the tarn shown on the map then following the snow or gravel slopes beyond through to the same saddle. From that saddle, descend a snow gully south to access another saddle at I35 262675. The gravel flat about a km east offers a good campsite. (The steep bouldery creek below here has been used to descend all the way to the Lambert Head Flats, but is loose and a poor route. Bouldery falls mean descending oversteep gravel ribs in places to get down). From this gravel flat, descend the steep loose stream east to about the 1300m contour. Drop packs and find a relatively safe route through otherwise steep tussock slopes usually marked with small cairns, crossing about 3 gullies. The first gully has a gravel creek and is crossed near a big boulder. Sidle out on the far side, cross a tiny saddle at 1340m and continue on across to a small dry shingle gully just above falls and ascend right up that to a cairn at the 1500m contour I35 275673 on a rib. Beyond here lie easier ledges and basins under Mt Lambert. Continue south east down across a basin then climb up past a big prominent boulder at I35 277669 before continuing a sidling ascent to the col on the ridge just west of pt 1967. Descend to the Lambert snowfields. Both upper branches of the Lambert Glacier give access to the Garden of Allah, with a few slots around Satans Saddle itself to watch out for. The sidle under Lambert is subject to spring and winter avalanches, and is not recommended in wet or snowy conditions. Time. Hunters Hut to the basin south east of pt 1443m, 6hrs. From the basin south east of pt 1443m to the Lambert Snowfield, 6hrs.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
P197

There are also some significant unclimbed rock ribs off the North Ridge into both the Poerua and Alpheus Creek that would be worth investigating.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West from Angel Col, (Kensington to The Great Unknown)
Grade 0
The high snow plateau between Mts Hulka and Farrar can be accessed up crevassed snowslopes from Angel Col, but later in the season this route can get cut off. Alternatively, the Arethusa can be used for access, but this can get very difficult too. However, once on this plateau, Farrar, Hulka and Kensington are readily approached. Other peaks and cols in this block are accessible from the western end of the Garden of Eden, once referred to as the Western Lawn. Travel along this western section of the Garden of Eden can sometimes be a bit tight now under pt 2020m, where crevasses below and bits of ice debris from above sometimes meet, but it always remains travellable.
SR
South Ridge, from Iceland Col.
Grade 2
Early in the season, this can be an easy snow climb from Iceland Col, but later on schrunds can increase difficulties. Alternatively, from the upper Arethusa, snowslopes lead up onto the east ridge which can be followed to the summit. Access up the Arethusa Icefall is getting increasingly difficult.
ER
East Ridge
Grade 2
A mix of rock and snow travel. The east ridge is easily approached from the upper Arethusa Glacier and travel on the upper section straight forward.
WR
West Ridge.
Grade 2.25
From the Poerua-Barlow saddle (between pts 1576m and 1557m), easy walking on the ridge leads to about the 1900m contour where the ridge becomes razorbacked. The first ascent party climbed most of this before gaining a snow couloir and ascending that through to the summit.
NR
North Ridge
Grade 3
From the North Poerua Glacier sidle east past pt 2177m to the col under the buttress dividing Alpheus Creek from the South Poerua, or else reach here from Alpheus Creek itself. Snow gullies lead to the col from both sides in early summer, but watch for stonefall, especially on the Poeroa side. Above the col, the most difficult climbing is in the first 50m on sometimes loose and sometimes firm schist. The first ascent route climbed directly from the col, turning slabby bluffs a short way up out to climbers left in a shallow flaky corner and continued more or less directly up to the top of the buttress. Above, pt 2332m can be bypassed closeby on snow to the east. A snow arete then leads to the last series of steps. These have reasonable rock, but are still demanding and an alternative is to sidle on snowslopes to the west, returning directly to the summit.

The west ridge remains unclimbed. It begins as a schist slab buttress from the Barlow.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Iceland Col
Grade 1.25
A straight forward snow ridge with a steep last short climb on sound rock to the summit.