Alpine - 50 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: The Whataroa is a major catchment draining peaks on the Main Divide from Mt Elie de Beaumont to the Garden of Eden and offers some wonderfully rugged mountains to climb in. Tracks lead to the head of the main Whataroa and as far as the Redfield Bridge just beyond Scone Creek in the Perth branch, but approaches up the valleys are challenging in themselves, requiring a high standard of fitness and commitment to the walk in. Consequently, not so many people climb here. Of those who do, some bypass the valleys by flying, and some approach over the Divide from the east. The climbing has a wilderness quality to it, and would be approached more often from a transalpine than from a technical climbing perspective. There are some wonderful transalpine routes in the region, such as those along the Price Range, over Whataroa Saddle, from the Butler Valley to the Neish Plateau, and traversing into and out of the Garden of Eden via The Great Unknown. Climbing on major peaks in the south of the catchment is reasonably serious, offering steep and sometimes long routes (up to 2000 metres height gain). Many climbs along the Main Divide from Elie de Beaumont to McClure Peak are also covered in the NZAC Aoraki Mount Cook guidebook. Yet for those who study maps and photos carefully, there is still scope for challenging new routes, such as recent climbs on the North West Buttress of Mt Whataroa and the North Face of Hochstetter Dome. Huts Butler Junction Hut (DOC): An eight-bunk hut, woodburner Whymper Hut (DOC): A six-bunk hut Stans Hut (community maintained): A four-bunk hut in upper Reynolds Creek Top Butler Hut (DOC): A six-bunk hut Nolans Hut (DOC): A historic, basic four-bunk hut in the Perth Valley just beyond Hughes Creek. Beware of mosquitoes here. Scone Hut (DOC): A six-bunk hut at the junction of the Perth River and Scone Creek WHATAROA VALLEY Road to Whymper Hut From State Highway 6, follow a gravel road on the true left of the Whataroa River for 1 km to a carpark, DOC sign, and the start of foot access up the valley. The marked access crosses private land and Dave and Bernadette Friend can be contacted for permission (phone 03 753 4091). A rough but regularly maintained track leads up the Whataroa to Butler Junction Hut and then on to Whymper Hut, with breaks on the river stones at Reynolds and Scotts Beaches, and Barrowman Flat. The bridge onto the Gunn Range opposite Jacks Creek has been removed, but bridges cross the Whataroa above the Perth Junction, just below the Butler Junction, and just above Rocky Creek. A bridge also crosses the Butler River near its junction with the Whataroa. If an overnight break is required between Butler Junction Hut and Whymper Hut, there is a reasonable campsite on the true left of Rocky Creek, near the track about 100 metres before the bridge over the Whataroa. Times: Road to the Perth–Whataroa track junction, 2 hrs; Perth–Whataroa track junction to Butler Junction, 5 ½ hrs; Butler Junction to Whymper Hut, 4 hrs. Whataroa River to Lake Barrowman Originally named in 1937 by Apperley, Sweney and Barrowman as Lake Mannering, this lake can be approached easily up a gravel stream bed from glacial flats in the head of the Whataroa, below the Whymper Glacier. There is good camping at the lake outlet. More useful information in http://remotehuts.co.nz/

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 1 route total 2132 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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East Face
Grade 1.25
From Whymper Hut follow the valley draining between Mt Wilczek and Mt Alec, bypassing a steeper section by utilising easier slopes near Pt 1573 metres. Near the range, head north on snow to access snow slopes leading to the summit from the south-east.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2359 m

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Wilc

Wilczek Peak was named by the German zoologist and mountaineer Robert Von Lendenfeld in 1884.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Whymper Hut follow the Callery Saddle route to the snow basin east of the pass. Climb snow slopes to a col south of Pt 2093 metres. Cross the Callery Glacier then ascend snow slopes and a short gully onto the North West Ridge. A quick rock scramble leads to the summit.
SR
South Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Whymper Hut, follow the gully draining between Mt Wilczek and Mt Alec, then snowfields beyond Pt 1573 metres up towards the Maximilian Range. The pleasant rock scramble along the South Ridge is a little longer and more challenging than that along the North West Ridge, and leads over a subsidiary peak en route.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2269 m

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Alec 0

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

EF
East Face
Grade 1.25
From Whymper Hut, follow the gully draining between Mt Wilczek and Mt Alec, then snowfields beyond Pt 1573 metres up towards the Maximilian Range.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2286 m

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Peter

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NR
North Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Whymper Hut, follow the gully draining between Mt Wilczek and Mt Alec, then snowfields beyond Pt 1573 metres up towards the Maximilian Range. The Maximilian Range and snow slopes on it can now be followed south over Pt 2328 metres to Mt Peter.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2343 m

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Named after Rod Syme by the first ascent party. There is no record of an ascent from the Whymper.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Burton Glacier
Grade 0
From the foot of the icefall in the Burton Glacier, head up a steep couloir offering direct access to the Maximilian Range just south of Roderick.

Showing all routes 35 routes total

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Alpine - 35 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: A DOC-maintained track leads up to the head of the Butler, but remember this is the West Coast, and even with tracks travel can be challenging. A bridge across the South Branch has improved access to Ice Lake. The mountains up here are awe-inspiring in height and grandeur. The Mawson Glacier is sometimes used to approach the Main Divide and Neish Plateau from here, and the stream below Ice Lake and the spur on its true right used to approach Grey Pass. Great transalpine lines. The Butler gives access to peaks such as Mt Huss, Dog Kennel Peak and Mt Victoire. Butler Junction Hut to Ice Lake From Butler Junction Hut a marked DOC track (recut in 2009) leads up to Top Butler Hut. To continue to Ice Lake, cross the Butler River South Branch on a new bridge then follow a cut and well-marked track (initially high above the river) to good camping at the south-west end of the lake. Times: Butler Junction to Top Butler Hut, 2 hrs; Top Butler Hut to Ice Lake, 2 hrs. Butler Junction Hut to upper Gunn River From the Butler Junction bridge over the Whataroa a maintained DOC marked route climbs to the scrubline on the Gunn Ridge, with big coloured marker poles near Pt 1203 metres. Above here markers cease, and the spur up onto the range is scrubby, narrow and eroding in places but negotiable. From the old cairn where the spur meets the Gunn Ridge, follow the ridge up to 1700 metres, then descend the valley that heads north from Pt 1854 metres to about the 1560-metre contour. From here sidle mostly west, crossing streams and climbing to 1700 metres again before swinging north-west down broad tussock slopes to lower flats in the upper Gunn basin. There are good campsites in the upper basin of the Gunn River to climb from. Descending from Gunn Ridge to the Whataroa, some have found the top of the tracked spur dangerous under loose snow and instead used the ridge over Pt 825 metres, which is less steep. This was reported as scrubby but reasonable going, as is McCormick Creek lower down. Time: Butler Junction Hut to cairn on Gunn Ridge, 5 hrs

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Access: For the most part, travel along the range from McFetrick Peak to Fardowner Peak is an easy rollercoaster, provided one can see where to go. But at the end of the range, north of Fardowner, greasy and broken bluffs on the ridge cut off the descent, making this a range with a sting in its tail. Leaving the range on the spur west of Gunn Peak also has its difficulties. To the east, tussock leads to Pt 1106 metres, and a spur heading north-east from it offers a hard, steep scrub bash down to the lower Whataroa. The range itself is a wonderful place to visit, most easily accessed from Butler Forks and the track into the upper Gunn Valley. Stans Hut is a community maintained four-bunk hut in upper Reynolds Creek. Traversing from Gunn River via Mt Cloher to Gunn Peak This is reasonably straightforward. Access to Mt Cloher from the Gunn River can be gained up a tiny side creek at I35 956553 / BW16 856 937 on the true left of the stream draining Mt Cloher, or up the spur at I35 950555 / BW16 850 939 and then sidling across an upper basin to the peak. A kilometre south of Gunn Peak it is easiest to sidle to the east through basins, avoiding a rough piece of ridge. Gunn Peak can also be sidled easily to the east. Fardowner is easily approached from Gunn Peak. The main ridge north-west from Fardowner is initially steep but traversable. However, at the col immediately southeast of Pt 1522 metres, guts and rotten rock walls make travel impractical. We don’t know anyone who has traversed or bypassed this.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Traverse
Grade .75
An easy scramble on shale-like rock leads to the summit from the south and east. From the north-west, a lightly exposed scramble leads along the Price Range. The ridge up to the Price Range from Pt 1527 metres, however, is of loose, friable schist that is steep, eroding, exposed and impractical.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2193 m

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Whatgl

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

WG
From Whataroa Glacier
Grade 1
A straightforward snow climb from the Whataroa Glacier.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2157 m

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Whatgl 0

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SER
South East Ridge
Grade 2
From Ice Lake, access the upper Whataroa névé via the gully on the true left and cross the névé to the base of the ridge, which is made up of steep, loose and rotten schist, with rock stacks in places. This is all negotiable but requires care and pitching in a few places. The first ascent party used a rope most of the way.
WR
West Ridge
Grade 1.25
A straightforward climb from the Whataroa Glacier.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2188 m

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Probably named after Alex and Hughie McFetterich, who farmed Tartare Flat. Sometimes traversed en route to or from the head of the Callery River. Frank Pearson, Alan Gill, and Gordon Howitt used this route to exit the Callery via the Gunn River and Price Range at Easter 1964.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 1
From about the 1300-metre contour in the upper Gunn River, head north-west up moraine, then scree and snow slopes, to the crest of the range. Easy travel along the range leads to the summit. To continue to the Callery, follow the range south over normally easy schrunds to Tartare Saddle. A steep spur at I35 912509 / BX16 812 893 can be used to descend to the valley, where the Callery River is normally easily crossed below the lake. Traversing around the lake is really only practical on the true left.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2219 m

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Tatare Range

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Wigley Glacier Route
Grade 0
From the upper Gunn River, head up tussock slopes towards a buttressed spur on the true left of the stream draining the Wigley Glacier. A steep but negotiable gully (requiring scrambling on bedrock), about 100 metres before the Wigley River issues from a slit gorge, leads through bluffs to rocky knolls above and gravel flats further up the valley. Lower ice shown on the map below 1600 metres has now largely gone. From I35 958525 / BW16 858 909, gain access to the upper Wigley Glacier via a diagonal ledge that doesn’t look promising from below on the true right of the icefall. This gravel ledge leads easily up beside the icefall to where the ice and upper glacier can be accessed. Crevasses may make this more difficult with ice recession and later in summer. From the upper glacier, snow slopes lead to the ridge and the peak is a bit beyond that.
Alpine - 29 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: Travel on the true left is better, but the true right is needed for some routes. On the true left, follow the DOC track up to just before the new bridge over the South Branch, about 300 metres up from the forks, then leave it to continue up the river. A mostly followable marked route, maintained by locals and hunters, continues on the true left. A little upstream, it ascends a shingle slide and follows the edge of a high terrace in the bush. Further up, it follows up one side creek, crosses through scrub and rata forest between side creeks and returns to the South Branch down the side creek that joins the river at about the 900-metre contour. Continue to good grassy camping on the moraine wall. On the true right, the Butler River South Branch has a section of big boulders and thick scrub for several hundred metres, starting on the bend about 1 km up from Top Butler Hut. It is generally quicker (but not easy) to avoid this section by using creeks and scrub bashing high above the river. Climb the side creek draining the Nansen Glacier until well above the scrub and sidle up to the head of the river, going from side creek to side creek, keeping below the bluffs. Butler River South Branch to upper Gino Watkins and Nansen Glaciers Climbing peaks between Moffat and Loughnan from the west is challenged by access to the upper neves. Routes were eventually pushed through in the 1950s, which are climbs in themselves to some extent. The practicality of access will vary with seasonal snow conditions, and should parties camp they need to know that descending in bad weather may prove very difficult. From the Butler River South Branch, ascend the spur on the true right of the lower Gino Watkins Glacier and cross this west ridge of Cassino Peak at about 2100–2200 metres, followed by a small rock rib beyond, onto the southern névé of the Nansen Glacier. Alternatively, start looking for a route onto the Gino Watkins Glacier anywhere from about 2000 metres up. A party that climbed several new routes from the Nansen in the 1980s described this access as probably the crux of the trip. They headed past the lake at the end of the lower Gino Watkins Glacier and up the flank of the ridge, to the right of some prominent slabs. An unpleasant scree slope then led to the ridge, a broad ledge past a rock step, and easier snow slopes. They abseiled down to the Nansen névé.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Loughnan 1

First climbed via the North East Ridge from the Grey Glacier by J Shanks, D A Carty, H Smith and L Dumbleton on 29 December 1935, turning gendarmes on the south-eastern side of the ridge.

Attribution: Alex Palman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the Grey Glacier
Grade 0
At the head of the Grey Glacier climb up to two detached rocks at the base of the third buttress east of the peak, then ascend the rock rib to the Main Divide. As an alternative, head up snow slopes west of the detached rocks to the Main Divide, then traverse the serrated ridge turning gendarmes on the south. The first peak is considered the summit.
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North West Flank
Grade 2.25
From the Butler River head up the valley draining Grey Pass, initially sidling on the true right to reach the basin above the 1100-metre contour. At about 1600 metres, head south-west over rock to a reach a snow shelf at about 1800 metres. Head south up a steeper band of slabby rock to the left of a small buttress and continue over a rib to the eastern edge of the permanent snow slope north of the peak at about 2100 metres. Continue up rock and snow bands left of the main snow gully, reaching the Main Divide at about 2480 metres. Snowslopes lead to the summit.
SR
South Ridge
Grade 2.25
Access the Nansen névé from the South Butler Valley. From the sharp col between Pt 2413 metres and Pt 2540 metres, steep firm rock on the first ascent (but steep snow slopes on a subsequent one), led to the Main Divide. Traverse over various small summits along the narrow and exposed South (Divide) Ridge. A step on the ridge is reportedly less difficult than it looks.
Loughnan 0

(Northern Grey Virgin). Cassino, Alamein and Takrouna were known as the Grey Virgins, and resisted attempts for many years. Alamein and Takrouna remain unclimbed directly from the Grey.

Attribution: Alex Plaman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SR
South Ridge
Grade 0
Climbed from the Nansen Glacier, up the South (Divide) Ridge. A short and easy climb with a few minutes of good rock at the top.
Loughnan

(Middle Grey Virgin). Cassino, Alamein and Takrouna were known as the Grey Virgins, and resisted attempts for many years. Alamein and Takrouna remain unclimbed directly from the Grey.

Attribution: Alex Palman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Original Route
Grade 2
From the Nansen névé, the summit pyramid involves snow slopes or a rock scramble, depending on conditions. A traverse of this peak along the Divide is straightforward.

(Southern Grey Virgin). Cassino, Alamein and Takrouna, were collectively known as the Grey Virgins. Attempts to climb them were made over many years and they were among the last significant peaks in the Alps to be climbed. Cassino Peak was originally climbed from the Grey Glacier along the South Ridge. From the low summit, traverse under rock pinnacles and up the right-hand face to the summit proper. John Harrison, Ian Baine, B H (Snow) Williams, L G Osborne, 29 December 1952

Attribution: Alex Plaman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South Ridge
Grade 0
Climb from the Grey Névé above the icefall to the hanging glacier. Then follow steep snow and rock to the Main Divide onto the low summit. Traverse under rock pinnacles between the summits and up the right hand face to the summit proper.
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From the West
Grade 2.25
From the lower Gino Watkins Glacier access the West Ridge. Up to the 2200-metre contour this ridge has been used as access by climbing parties camping on the Nansen Glacier. From the upper Nansen névé, climb the ridge to the summit.
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North Ridge (Main Divide)
Grade 2.25
Climbed from the Nansen névé, approaching the peak from the north, mostly up the face. On the first ascent a good snow lead took the party to the Main Divide North Ridge about 150 metres below the summit. Several pitches of mixed climbing led to the top. Descent via a snowface and a couple of snow gullies back to the Nansen.

First climbed up the South Ridge from the east by A J Scott, Russell Fraser, Alf Brustad, January 1933. The North Peak of Mt Livingstone (Pt 2476 metres) is unclimbed, and the ridge between here and Cassino is untraversed.

Attribution: Alex Palman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Original Route
Grade 0
From the col east of Moffat climb snow and ice slopes.
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South Ridge from the West
Grade 2
From the Gino Watkins Glacier, ascend a snow gully between Mt Moffat and Mt Livingstone. The snow climb up the ridge is not difficult, but access to the mountain pushes the grade up.

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Attribution: Alex Palman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 0
Climbed via Panorama, Bruce Murray, and Upton. Beyond Panorama and its snow plateau, the ridge had a mix of rock pinnacles and snow arêtes, while a tower before Upton Peak, like the peak itself, was turned on the north-east side. A shoulder of snow then led on to a narrow section of fine black crumbly rock that several early accounts disliked, followed by a step in the ridge that was passed on snow out to the left. Above this, a snow plateau with crevasses Climbed via Panorama, Bruce Murray, and Upton. Beyond Panorama and its snow plateau, the ridge had a mix of rock pinnacles and snow arêtes, while a tower before Upton Peak, like the peak itself, was turned on the north-east side. A shoulder of snow then led on to a narrow section of fine black crumbly rock that several early accounts disliked, followed by a step in the ridge that was passed on snow out to the left. Above this, a snow plateau with crevasses led them to the summit
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From the West
Grade 2
From the Butler River South Branch, access the upper Gino Watkins Glacier. This may be difficult. Climb snow slopes to the snow saddle between Mt Moffat and Mt Livingstone and continue to the summit
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South West Ridge
Grade 2.25
The first ascent party camped on the Nansen névé and crossed the west ridge of Cassino to access the Gino Watkins Glacier. The descent into the Gino Watkins was particularly steep. From theGino Watkins Glacier climb the west face of Pt 2543 metres to access the Main Divide southwest of Mt Moffat. The summit ridge was largely sidled on the left, returning to the Divide just below the top for a final arête. Reported as scrambling, with the odd pitch along the Main Divide.

Originally climbed on 9 December 1935 by D O W Hall and W G Mace via the north-east (Divide) ridge from the upper Sustins Glacier. The ridge is slow travel, and it is better to access the Main Divide up snow slopes closer to the peak itself. Most of the ridge between Mt Huss and Pt 2543 metres remains untraversed. Pt 2543 metres, near Moffat, is unclimbed.

Attribution: Alex Palman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge (Main Divide)
Grade 0
Ascend a rock buttress, west of a snow couloir between the Sustins and Easter Glaciers, from the Classen Glacier. At the head of the couloir use snow and ice slopes to gain the Main Divide north-east of the peak, as close to the summit as possible.
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South Ridge (Main Divide)
Grade 3.25
A steep rock climb. The ridge has three steps, the first can be turned on the left and the second on the right, with an exposed traverse on rock dropping straight to the glacier below. The third step involves easy scrambling.
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West Ridge
Grade 2.25
From Lake Barrowman head up the true left of the stream draining the small glacier under Mt Huss. From the small glacier, two snow guts lead up to the range between Dog Kennel Peak and Mt Huss. The ridge is of the usual broken sort, but rock on Mt Huss proper is rough and firm, offering four simple but exposed pitches. A mixed route with good rock.
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West Face
Grade 4
600m Climbed from a camp in the Lake Barrowman Valley. ‘Reminiscent of the West Face of Haidinger, only harder and more rock’. A difficult route – the grade is approximate.
Loughnan 2

This peak on a ridge south-west of Mt Loughnan is well recognised in alpine literature from the 1950s, but is not named on current maps. It was named by the first ascent party after Allan Dick of Lilybank Station, who was very supportive of many climbing parties.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

ER
East Ridge
Grade 2
Access the Nansen Glacier as outlined above. From the col to the east, the peak has been climbed up broken rock, moving over towards the south face higher up.
Sthbutler 0

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Butler River South Branch
Grade 1
Ascend a snow gully that leads directly to the col between Pt 2198 metres and Pt 2020 metres. A short scramble leads to the broad snow summit.
Sthbutler 1

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Ridge
Grade 1.25
From the lower Barrowman Valley, scramble up onto this rocky ridge. Higher up, a snowfield gives a break, and there is enjoyable climbing on weatherworn rock slabs. Mixed ground then leads to the low peak. There is a descent and considerable climb from the low to the high peak and, on the first ascent, the route led north across a snowfield to a col on the North Ridge. Easy scrambling along that leads to the high peak.
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North Ridge
Grade 1.75
From the Butler River South Branch, ascend the snow gully that leads directly to the col between Pt 2198 metres and Pt 2020 metres and continue to the summit.
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South Ridge
Grade 1.25
From the Butler River South Branch head up the gully under the col at Pt 1838 metres, then north up snow slopes. From about the height of the col swing back to the left across broad ledges, a gully and steeper rock to the vicinity of the col itself. Follow up the South Ridge.
Sthbutler 3

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Original Route
Grade 1
This rock peak can be climbed up extensive slabs from the stream below Lake Barrowman. Snow on the slabs can be a significant avalanche hazard.
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West Face
Grade 0
A route on slabs from Barrowman Stream.
SER
South East Ridge
Grade 2
From the South Butler Valley, head straight up a snow gully then rock east of Mt Barrowman towards a col immediately south-east of Mt Barrowman. The last part to the col is difficult (slabs). Above, about five pitches (the first exposed and on loose rock) lead up the ridge to the summit.
Sthbutler 2

Named by Otto Frind in 1914.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NR
North Rib
Grade 2
Begin up a snow gut (now often rock) that descends between the north-west ridge and the north rib. The route then swings left up the north rib, east of this gut.
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South West Face
Grade 2
From Lake Barrowman, follow the broad gully directly to the summit of Dog Kennel Peak. Falling from the route will see you in the lake, so take care!
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North West Ridge
Grade 2.25
From the South Butler Valley, head straight up the snow (rock) gully to the col immediately south-east of Mt Barrowman, and en route climb around a small waterfall out to the right. The last part to the col is difficult (slabs). The back (Lake Barrowman) side of Dog Kennel Peak offers steep snow and nice slabs.
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South East Ridge and ‘The Dog’
Grade 2.75
From the South Butler Valley, follow the narrow snow (or rock) gully leading up to the lowest point on the ridge between Mt Huss and Dog Kennel Peak. (The small peak immediately west of here is referred to as the Dog.) There are two difficult rock steps, the first leading up to the Dog. From there, descend a narrow snow ridge to a second col, where there is another rock step on the ridge, before the final easier climb to Dog Kennel Peak.

Showing all routes 9 routes total

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Alpine - 9 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: Often used as a route out of the Garden snow plateaus, the Perth is a big river in its own right and longer than the river it feeds into, the Whataroa. A major tributary, the Barlow, is the epitome of wilderness and seldom travelled. A track leads up the Perth to Scone Creek Hut and a swingbridge across the Perth a short distance beyond. All tracks cease here, and travel up valley is on the riverbed or bushbashing, depending on conditions. Sealy Pass, the northern slopes of the Butler Range, Stewart Saddle and Main Divide peaks north of it where the peaks are not particularly difficult but access is, all offer great transalpine and climbing trips. As does The Great Unknown. Whataroa to Scone Creek From the swingbridge over the Whataroa, the track up the Perth climbs to a forested terrace, following the boggy line of the old cattle track. It descends to the Perth at Hughes Creek. Historic Nolans Hut offers somewhere dry to stay just beyond, but expect basic. Maintained to a marked route standard, the track continues upvalley to Scone Hut (6 bunk), then over the Scone Creek bridge to a second bridge over the Perth itself giving access to Redfield Creek and The Great Unknown. All tracks cease here. Scone Creek to the upper Perth The true left is used. Travel varies considerably, depending on river levels. Use gravel and boulder beaches as much as possible, as the bush is scrubby and slow. Prospectors Creek can be difficult to cross. There is a reasonable option where this stream splits into two at the 600m contour. Shingle offers better travel in the riverbed around Teichelmann and Tainui Creeks. Cut the corner on the 600m terrace above Teichelmann, descending to near river level again near Tarn Creek. Above Adverse Creek, use the slip marked on the true left of the Perth and go around the south side of the last patch of scrub marked in the valley to the flats. Good campsites and open travel exist to the head of the Perth now. Normally, the river is easily crossed on these flats. Times Road to Scone Creek Hut Scone Creek Hut to the head of the Perth Adverse Creek to the Garden of Eden In low to average flows, crossing the Perth is practical near the Junction with Adverse Creek. Follow up the true left of Adverse to tussock and low scrub slopes. Continue sidling up on slopes above the stream until it flattens off just above the 1000m contour. The stony basin can now be followed up around to the north. Climb out in the head on the true left of the valley to reach the Gardens at about I35 163617. Adverse Creek was named by Pascoe's party in about 1935. Time: allow about 7 hrs up and 5 down. Eves Rib to the Garden of Eden This is a direct but relatively steep route on loose gravel and rock, and care will be needed. Higher up, snowslopes east of the ridge offer the most practical route, reaching the lip of the Garden approx 500m east of pt 2007m. Pt 2007 can also be approached, but rock is loose leading up to the knoll itself, and the descent directly north to the Garden is on good rock but a little scrambling and routefinding will be necessary. Perth Glacier to the Garden of Eden The Perth Valley and glacier itself can be used as a direct route to Perth Col, depending on conditions. Early in the summer, enough snow may lie on the glacier to follow it directly, as it feeds into the head of the valley slightly from the true right. More likely, from the valley floor begin on the true left of this ice tongue under bluffs and continue up gravel in a steep rocky gully ahead between bluffs that also has a cowlick of ice feeding into it from the shelf above. Rock is loose here and some scrambling will be required. Old snow cover would help. Gravel slopes under the cowlick lead up climbers left, onto a shoulder above the bluffs where the ice can be accessed again, at I35 244608. Descending, sidle onto a gravel shoulder above bluffs where the ice finishes on the true left of the main glacier and above bluffs at I35 244608. Sidle diagonally on down to the left through the bluffs over gravel and bedrock into a small eroding gully that quickly leads to gravel slopes and the valley floor. Watch for loose rocks. Bettison Stream A marked track leads from the true right of Scone Creek as shown on I35 to the bushline on the true right of Bettison Stream. Here, cairns on open scree lead past scrub to the tussock. Sidle upvalley at about 1200m until reasonable travel in the stream below appears at about I35 153541, then follow up the stream

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2113 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Main Divide Ridges
Grade 0
Traversed during a climb of Edison.
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North East Ridge
Grade 1.25
From the Havelock Valley, climb the North East Ridge on the true right of Edison Stream over several big but easy rock steps to the summit.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2337 m

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Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 2.75
From the Havelock Valley gain the Main Divide south of Rankin Peak, or by following the North East Ridge route on Rankin Peak. Traverse Rankin Peak and follow the Main Divide to the summit. The final 50 metres is on steep, tricky rock.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2123 m

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Whatgl 1Mtwhataroa

Mt Whataroa is one of the dramatic buttressed peaks visible on the Butler Range when looking up the Whataroa Valley from the highway.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Ice Lake
Grade 0
Access the névé of the Whataroa Glacier. Cross this and climb to the Butler Range, aiming for the saddle immediately east of Mt Whataroa. About 200 metres of rock scrambling leads to the summit.
NWB
North West Buttress
Grade 3
800m This 800-metre buttress is visible from the road bridge. Grass on the lower half of the route lets the climb down, but can be largely avoided by using a snow gully on the right. This gives access to a ramp/ledge leading out left onto the buttress proper. A difficult section of steep rock follows, where there is still some moss and grass. Eventually, solid rock climbing on schist slabs offers much better going. These lead to the summit crags. Climbing potential also exists on the pinnacle between Mt Whataroa and Tohunga Peak.

Showing all routes 1 route total 2014 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Hughes Creek
Grade 1
The Butler Range has also been approached from the Perth. An old cullers track up a scrubby spur east of Nolans Hut is now unfollowable. A route preferred by hunters these days uses Pauline Creek to access the upper basins of Hughes Creek. Hughes Creek itself can also be used directly. The creek can be followed right up, with a sidle around a gorge necessary between the 600- and 700-metre contours, and a rougher bouldery section below the big fork at the 760-metre contour. Alternatively, the first marked creek on the true right below the big fork offers relatively open travel through the scrub zone, leading up to Pt 1450 metres from the north-west and has also been used to access the upper basins of Hughes Creek. In the true right basin, about 300 metres up from forks at 980 metres, a reasonable bivvy rock is reported. To continue to the Butler Range, go up the gully opposite the bivvy rock until the col east of Mt Whataroa is reached, then scramble up the ridge to 2014 metres. Mt Whataroa can also be approached this way.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 1926 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North East Ridge
Grade 2
From the Whataroa Glacier sidle steep slopes, best under snow, to a rib off Whataroa Peak, and cross the snow gully beyond. Three rope-lengths on poor rock lead to the col between Tohunga and a sharp subsidiary of Whataroa Peak. A rock outcrop on the summit ridge can be traversed low on the Whataroa side. A reasonable route in suitable snow conditions, but otherwise pretty tricky. This party descended the obvious snow gully directly back to Ice Lake, which they don’t recommend.
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From Hughes Creek
Grade 1
From Nolans Hut in the Perth, access Hughes Creek and follow it up. Travel is reasonably good, but there is a gorge to sidle between the 600- and 700-metre contours and a rougher bouldery section below the forks at 760 metres. Continue south and head up a side creek in open going through scattered scrub from I35 063553 / BW17 964 936. This creek splits into two tiny parallel creeks draining from the peak. Continue south-east up the face to the summit. If traversing between Tohunga and Whataroa Peaks, a short vertical section of difficult rock east of the col between the peaks would probably require a rope.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1845 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge
Grade 1
From the Perth up the spur over Pt 1049 metres to the summit. Mind the scrub – it’s heinous. Old maps indicate the peak to be the higher 1901-metre one at the ridge junction, rather than the 1845-metre peak currently shown.
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