Alpine - 71 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 16

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Access: The Wilberforce River is rarely visited by climbing parties – the upper reaches involve a long approach via the riverbed itself or are more commonly reached by transalpine parties from the Waimakariri Valley or the West Coast. The Wilberforce catchment leads to seven passes that cross the Main Divide, as well as several other passes that allow travel between various valleys east of the Divide. The Wilberforce peaks are generally small and present few technical difficulties, although locally the rock is very loose and some of the side creeks used for approaches can be gorged or bluffed and deceptively tricky to negotiate once the snow has melted. Most peaks on the Rolleston Range almost never see an ascent; even the more frequented peaks, such as Mt Bryce, Mt Williams and Turret Peak, are rarely climbed. Mts Murchison and Greenlaw are the most popular peaks included in this section, but both tend to be approached from the Waimakariri River. Huts Manuels Hut : Mt Algidus Station (private) Moa Stream Hut (DOC): A four-bunk hut, hidden in bush above the river. Moa Hut, situated alongside Wilberforce River, Mt Algidus Station (private) Unknown Hut (DOC) : A tidy four-person hut. Urquharts Hut (DOC) : A historic hut with beech-pole frame, earth floor and six sack bunks. The hut was built to accommodate prospectors involved in an unsuccessful mining scheme instigated during the Great Depression in the 1930s. Park Morpeth Hut (CMC) : A six-bunk hut with mountain radio. Weka Burnet Bivouac (DOC) : A two-person bivvy hidden in swampy bush marked with an orange triangle. Fang Hill Hut (Glenthorne Station) : A fee is charged per night, payable to Glenthorne Station. Ask for permission. Wilberforce River access Access by 4WD is generally straightforward along the true left of the Wilberforce River as far as Bristed Stream, although crossing Fang Stream can be tricky. There are two alternatives, one following a rutted left above the Cronin Stream confluence, and either continue to the zigzag track to Browning Pass or follow the Wilberforce north-east to Popes Pass. In low water, river crossings can usually be found that allow access to the most commonly used tributaries, such as Boulderstone, Kakapo, Kiwi, Moa and Unknown Streams. high-level track through matagouri which leads directly to Fang Hill Hut, and an alternative low-level track along the base of the fan. Ring Jamie or Fiona at Glenthorne Station (phone 03 318 5801) for permission and the latest travel conditions, and call into the station to pay a road-use fee. 4WD vehicles can be taken further upriver if conditions allow. It is a long walk to the head of the Wilberforce River. Follow the true left of the river as far as Bristed Stream. If the river is low a crossing can be made here and travel upriver continues on the true right. In high water, a route exists in scrub above the river where it abuts a small bluff. At the end of the bluff, drop back down to the river and continue on the true left to Burnet Stream. Gain the terrace on the north side of the Burnet Stream confluence and look for an old sign at the west side of the terrace, marking an overgrown trail through bush. The trail continues for 3.5 km around the base of Sebastopol before rejoining the Wilberforce River opposite Urquharts Hut. Find a suitable river crossing and continue along the true right of the river until opposite Park Morpeth Hut. Cross again to the true

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 1 route total 2186 m

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Peak on Main Divide between Wilberforce and Taipo catchments.

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South East Ridge
Grade 0
Difficult to approach. The more desirable route either climbs the South Ridge from Whitehorn Pass descending onto the Cronin Glacier from the 2059m knoll, or makes a sidle then full ascent of the Cronin Glacier from the pass. Both routes gain the steep, exposed Southeast Ridge to the summit. Whitehorn Pass is reached by sidling the slopes from Harman Pass, then ascending snowslopes to the pass. Beware of deep crevasses on all snow and ice routes in this region.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2119 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 1.75
A rocky climb on a steep, loose ridge from Mt Pope.
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South West Ridge
Grade 1.75
From the upper Wilberforce River climb scree, steep rock and tussock to a group of tarns at the foot of the South West Ridge, and follow this to the summit.
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North East Ridge
Grade 1.25
Climb the broken ridge from Mt Rosamond.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1585 m

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Access: From Clough Memorial, continue up the Wilberforce River on tussock and scree directly to the pass. Alternatively, from Browning Pass follow the north-east ridge towards Mt Harman before following an east-trending ridge and descending to Popes Pass. From the pass, descend scree and tussock then an overgrown route through scrub to Julia Creek.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 1 route total 1720 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Popes Pass
Grade .75
A walk from Popes Pass.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 1411 m

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Access: Near the head of the Wilberforce River, Browning Pass is easily reached via the old zigzag track to Lake Browning. To descend to the west, follow the western side of Lake Browning and the poled track leading down to Harman Hut. From Harman Hut in the Arahura Valley, the track continues towards Browning Pass before dropping into O’Connors Creek and following that up on gravel. The climb up to the pass, marked by poles, begins at about the 980-metre contour on the true right. At about the 1200-metre contour, above a waterfall, it crosses back to the true left and follows rocky knolls 100 metres or so west of the creek, leading to gentle basins north of Lake Browning. It is a wonderful place to camp in fine weather. Note that Browning Pass is not the lowest point on the Divide at the head of the lake, but lies to the south. The descent to the Wilberforce River, scrambling down to scree and then tussock, is not difficult in summer but can be considerably more challenging in winter with steep hard snow. Time : Harman Hut to the pass, 2–3 hrs

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Twin Peaks 1895m and 1886m On the 1962 NZAC map, these peaks were referred to individually as Mt Augusta and Mt Emily

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lake Browning
Grade 0
A scramble from the basins of upper O’Connors Creek.

Twin Peaks 1895m and 1886m On the 1962 NZAC map, these peaks were referred to individually as Mt Augusta and Mt Emily

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lake Browning
Grade 0
A scramble from the basins of upper O’Connors Creek.
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MAIN DIVIDE : HOKITIKA SADDLE TO BROWNING PASS
Grade 0
Peaks described in this section mainly include climbs approached from the Kokatahi Valley in the west, although most peaks on the Main Divide here have traditionally been approached from the east.
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Browning Pass to Mt Ambrose
Grade 0
This is a great transalpine trip in fine weather. Many of the peaks and passes mentioned below are either traversed or easily accessible en route. From Lake Browning, descend west toward Hall Creek, sidling in on the Main Divide side and crossing two tiny gullies en route. Cross Hall Creek at about the 1240-metre contour above a small waterfall (the creek is confined below this) and continue up the valley, initially on the true right. There are some nice but open campsites on moss at about the 1280– metre contour. Gravel gives way to snow slopes that lead to Hall Col. An easy scrambling side trip on bedrock leads up to a flat-topped peak at Pt 1950 metres, where there are extensive views. To access the Retreat Snowfield, descend from the north-western corner of Hall Col. Continue down to the gravel moraine around Farquharson Saddle, a cool place to camp in fine weather. A small stream is usually flowing on gravel 100 metres north-east of Farquharson Saddle. Two routes lead to Griffiths Saddle, one using the upper gullies of Gifford Stream and the other the Main Divide ridge before sidling the last few hundred metres into the saddle. To approach Clarkes Pass from Griffiths Saddle, descend into Griffiths Stream and climb up to Clarkes Pass directly. It is tempting to keep height and sidle, but it is more messy than it looks. Active scree and loose, steep gullies of clay rock make travel arduous and unpleasant, and there is significant stone fall to watch for. South-west from Clarkes Pass, Commodore Peak is approached up snow slopes. The Divide just here is broad, with basins and outcropping shards of rock. Mt Ambrose is easily approached from Commodore Peak. From there, either descend to Hokitika Saddle, or else head north and west from Mt Ambrose down a gravel gully to the 1900-metre contour and then swing further west into a gravel basin draining towards the Kokatahi. This route then ascends a gravel and tussock basin back to the ridge at J34 652986 / BV19 552 370. Snow slopes lead to Pt 2006 metres, from where gravel slopes and bedrock lead easily north-west into the saddle before The Rampart. There is one small tarn 30 metres above the saddle on the way down. Allow two days from Browning Pass to Mt Ambrose in reasonable conditions. From this saddle (J34 642988 / BV19 542 372), a shallow gravel gully offers a good route down to join Park Stream about 200 metres up from Sokota Creek.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2020 m

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Turret

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Ridge
Grade 1.25
Follow Chimera Creek and climb the scree slide that leads to a big basin south-west of the summit of Turret Peak. Climb scree on to the West Ridge and scramble to the top, avoiding difficulties on the west side of the ridge and negotiating a short notch and cheval some distance below the top.
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North East Ridge
Grade 1.75
Follow Kakapo Stream and, after a couple of kilometres, pass a 10-metre waterfall on the true left and make a 500-metre bushbash above a small gorge. A longer route involves climbing the ridge south of Kakapo Stream and dropping down into the upper basin west of Mt Gideon. Continue upstream to the tarns north of Pt 1731 metres and from here gain the ridge between Pt 1921 metres and Turret Peak. Follow a steep shelf on the north side of the ridge to avoid gendarmes, and then climb a gully that approaches the summit directly. An alternative access, Boulderstone Stream, offers easy travel to the upper forks from the Wilberforce River. Easy travel continues up the true left branch, climbing out to Pt 1611 metres and sidling around to Pt 1731 metres.

Showing all routes 2 routes total

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Access: Travel is good along Moa Stream. In its lower reaches both sides provide generally good travel, but cross to the true right well before North Stream. A well-used pass at the head of Moa Stream, near Pt 1896 metres, provides straightforward access to Boundary Basin. To reach the North Mathias River avoid the lower gorged slopes of Boundary Creek by following the creek to the western edge of the basin and then traversing on scree and tussock slightly south-west. Cross the first side creek and continue across scree and above scrub to the second side creek, and follow this to the valley floor. North Stream North Stream is part of a tramping route linking Unknown and Moa Streams via Moa Saddle. Travel up the creek is generally a boulder-hop in the lower reaches and crosses tussock flats higher up. Pukeko Stream Travel is generally straightforward along Pukeko Stream, climbing up around a waterfall on the true left. The stream provides access to Cattle Basin and Mistake Creek via Excellent Saddle, and to Kiwi Stream via the easy saddle between Pt 1818 metres and Pt 1780 metres (this is incorrectly named Excellent Saddle on map sheets J34 and BW19), climbing out just before the waterfalls. The location of Excellent Saddle is shown correctly on map sheet NZMS 1 S65 (the now obsolete inch-to-the-mile maps), at c 1590 metres at the northern head of Cattle Basin.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2300 m

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Mt Williams is the highest peak in the Rolleston Range and higher than any on the Divide in this area – its distinctive twin summits are clearly recognisable from the Arrowsmith Range and other points to the south. Mt Williams may have been first climbed in the 1880s by Arthur Dobson, when he was supervising the construction of a road over Mathias Pass. The earliest recorded ascent was by Nowell Syme in 1949 and the second ascent occurred about one year later, but after that the peak was pretty much left alone until 2003, when it was rediscovered by Christchurch climber Philip Tree. Subsequently the peak has seen an increase in popularity, although these days it is most often attempted from the Wilberforce side.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Original Route
Grade 0
The first recorded ascent was made from Moraine Hut via grassy sidles and snow slopes. It was most likely climbed by the small glacier between the two summits and from there to the top.
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From Moa Stream
Grade 2
From the head of Moa Stream climb to the saddle just north of Pt 2054 metres. The tussock rib on the left of the couloir sometimes provides the best route to the saddle. Cross the glacier on the south-west face of Mt Williams and head up, aiming for the col between the twin peaks of Mt Williams. Access to the col may be complicated by a schrund. From here, move slightly out on to the north-west face and climb loose rock to the summit.

Showing all routes 4 routes total

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Access: From the true right of the Wilberforce River, cross to the true left of Unknown Stream where it abuts bluffs and follow it along the straightforward lower reaches. About 4 km beyond Unknown Hut the river forks, the northern branch draining Unknown Col and the south branch draining a rugged section of the Rolleston Range. Travel up the north branch follows a narrow valley, subject to rock fall, which has three waterfalls part way up. Negotiating the third waterfall requires a rock climb on the true right. This waterfall has turned some parties back and a rope may be needed. In early season the waterfalls are buried in avalanche debris and travel is straightforward.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 4 routes total 2182 m

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BryceP266 2

Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge
Grade 1.75
From the head of the North Mathias River climb the Omatane Glacier to reach the start of the North Ridge. A straightforward climb although the rock is loose in places.
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South Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Unknown Col the ridge is broad at first but steepens below the summit and may require a traverse right onto the face. This is a straightforward climb in good snow conditions but involves some tricky loose rock in late season.
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East Ridge
Grade 1.75
From the upper Unknown Stream, follow a vague rock buttress to a high point immediately north-east of a small col marking the foot of the East Ridge. Climb into the col then follow the ridge to the summit. This is a straightforward climb in good snow conditions, but involves some loose rock in late season.
BC
East Ridge from Brunswick Creek
Grade 1
Brunswick Creek provides straightforward access directly up the branch draining Mt Bryce. Continue up scree to the south. From the upper Brunswick, fairly easy rock scrambling in late summer leads up the north-east face.

Showing all routes 7 routes total

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Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

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Access: Travel is straightforward in the lower 3.5 km. To travel beyond here see Mungo Pass.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2102 m

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TreadwellP266 0

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Gibson Stream
Grade 0
From Gibson Stream, climb through scree and steep tussock east of the bluffs and waterfall draining the basin below Mt Treadwell. From this basin several options exist to the summit.
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North Ridge
Grade 0
The North Ridge can be reached via a traverse from Mungo Pass, or from the basin east of the peak and a small glacier between Mt Treadwell and Mungo Peak. .
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From Brunswick Creek
Grade 1
From gravel in the upper basin of Brunswick Creek, head south-east up a scree gully that leads to a final short scramble on rock.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 1757 m

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Access: From Brunswick Creek travel up to the pass is mostly on gravel. On the Gibson Stream side, head down from the pass on steep snow-grass into the basin at the head of the valley. South-west of Pt 1290 metres Gibson Stream is gorged, with a waterfall at one point so either climb out immediately on the true left up to a shingle bench at the 1440-metre contour (and then follow the spur beyond that down to the col immediately north of Pt 1290 metres), or descend Gibson Stream a short distance before climbing up to the same col. From the col north of Pt 1290 metres sidle across to the true left of the first creek marked on map sheets J34 and BV19 east of Pt 1290 metres and descend to Gibson Stream itself before the second marked creek. In spring –sometimes into summer – avalanche debris may fill the gorge, allowing an easy alternative route down on snow, but remember that there is a waterfall under the snow somewhere. Merle Sweney, D Cambridge (crossed west to east), March 1933 Times : Mungo-Brunswick confluence to Mungo Pass, about 3 ½ hrs ; Mungo Pass to Gibson- Unknown confluence, about 4 hrs

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

MungoP266

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Gibson Stream
Grade 0
From Gibson Stream, climb through scree and steep tussock east of the bluffs and waterfall draining the basin below Mt Treadwell. From this basin several options exist to the summit.
NR
North Ridge
Grade 0
A straightforward climb from Mungo Pass.

Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade 0
Traverse the Divide from Mungo Pass.
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North Ridge
Grade 1.25
Mt Eliot and Pt 2021 metres can be climbed from the basin immediately to their east. The central section of the creek draining this basin is gorged and can be passed only after an exposed scramble on loose rock on the true right. If avalanche debris fills the valley, travel is straightforward. Alternative access is possible via the next creek north, draining the basin south-east of Pt 1949 metres. This is a steep, moraine-filled creek with one small moraine step before reaching basins at the head. To reach Mt Eliot, cross the ridge south of this basin on snow and ice, and then aim for the gully between Mt Eliot and Pt 2021 metres. The summits are a simple scramble from here.

Showing all routes 10 routes total

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Alpine - 10 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

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Access: From the true right of the Wilberforce River cross Unknown Stream to the true left of Griffiths Stream. Travel is generally good to the head of the valley.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Access: From the upper Mungo River, Hokitika Saddle can be approached directly up a steep gravel gut, but this is a poor route, exposed to stone fall. A better option exists : from about the 1300-metre contour in the upper Mungo Valley, ascend scree to the south-east leading to a shelf at the 1640-metre contour (J34 664974 / BV19 564 358). From Hokitika Saddle, Clarkes Pass is accessible via Mt Ambrose. To descend Griffiths Stream to the east, follow the creek directly off the pass down to the Griffiths. This is easy in good snow conditions, but if snow is gone a bit of scrambling will be required at a rocky section at about the 1400-metre contour. Watch for stones. Alternatively, the ridge descending from Pt 1850 metres has also been used.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Hokitika Saddle
Grade 1
A straightforward ascent from the vicinity of Hokitika Saddle. If approaching from Griffiths Stream, then before reaching Hokitika Saddle follow a steep couloir leading to a bench below Pt 1853 metres. Alternatively, follow the ridge north from Hokitika Saddle. From here cross easy glaciated slopes to the summit.
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Browning Pass to Mt Ambrose
Grade 0
This is a great transalpine trip in fine weather. Many of the peaks and passes mentioned below are either traversed or easily accessible en route. From Lake Browning, descend west toward Hall Creek, sidling in on the Main Divide side and crossing two tiny gullies en route. Cross Hall Creek at about the 1240-metre contour above a small waterfall (the creek is confined below this) and continue up the valley, initially on the true right. There are some nice but open campsites on moss at about the 1280– metre contour. Gravel gives way to snow slopes that lead to Hall Col. An easy scrambling side trip on bedrock leads up to a flat-topped peak at Pt 1950 metres, where there are extensive views. To access the Retreat Snowfield, descend from the north-western corner of Hall Col. Continue down to the gravel moraine around Farquharson Saddle, a cool place to camp in fine weather. A small stream is usually flowing on gravel 100 metres north-east of Farquharson Saddle. Two routes lead to Griffiths Saddle, one using the upper gullies of Gifford Stream and the other the Main Divide ridge before sidling the last few hundred metres into the saddle. To approach Clarkes Pass from Griffiths Saddle, descend into Griffiths Stream and climb up to Clarkes Pass directly. It is tempting to keep height and sidle, but it is more messy than it looks. Active scree and loose, steep gullies of clay rock make travel arduous and unpleasant, and there is significant stone fall to watch for. South-west from Clarkes Pass, Commodore Peak is approached up snow slopes. The Divide just here is broad, with basins and outcropping shards of rock. Mt Ambrose is easily approached from Commodore Peak. From there, either descend to Hokitika Saddle, or else head north and west from Mt Ambrose down a gravel gully to the 1900-metre contour and then swing further west into a gravel basin draining towards the Kokatahi. This route then ascends a gravel and tussock basin back to the ridge at J34 652986 / BV19 552 370. Snow slopes lead to Pt 2006 metres, from where gravel slopes and bedrock lead easily north-west into the saddle before The Rampart. There is one small tarn 30 metres above the saddle on the way down. Allow two days from Browning Pass to Mt Ambrose in reasonable conditions. From this saddle (J34 642988 / BV19 542 372), a shallow gravel gully offers a good route down to join Park Stream about 200 metres up from Sokota Creek.
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MAIN DIVIDE : HOKITIKA SADDLE TO BROWNING PASS
Grade 0
Peaks described in this section mainly include climbs approached from the Kokatahi Valley in the west, although most peaks on the Main Divide here have traditionally been approached from the east.

Showing all routes 4 routes total 1593 m

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Access: From Griffiths Stream climb moderately-angled loose gravel and eroding bedrock, avoiding steep guts and loose rock and picking a line through a steep band at about 1500 metres. The pass itself is a dry boulder field, with more stable and smoother rock outcrops among tussock to the south-west. About 30 metres above the pass, at J34 676996 / BV19 576 380, there is a small tarn about one metre across. To descend directly to the Kokatahi from Clarkes Pass follow the creek down towards the 1000- metre contour, keeping to the true left lower down. Pick the best looking line across to the ridge on the true left of Clarke Creek then follow the spur down. The scrub bashing here is exquisite ; neither you nor the leatherwood will emerge unscathed. Alternatively, from the scrub edge, follow a steep gully to the spur and descend an overgrowing slip down to the Kokatahi. Both these routes are arduous. P Phipps, B Cropp and two dogs ( first crossing, west to east), December 1934

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Commodore Peak was referred to as Commodore Ridge on maps until about 1970.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade 1
A straightforward traverse from Mt Ambrose along the South West Ridge.
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East Ridge
Grade .75
From Clarkes Pass, climb tussock and minor bluffs along the Divide, veering left onto a shoulder east of Commodore Peak. Cross snow basins and ribs beyond, then climb to the summit.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade 0
A long ridge when climbed from Clarkes Pass.
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North East Ridge
Grade 0
From the head of Griffiths Glacier the ridge presents few problems.

From Griffiths Stream, an easy but uninspiring approach on gravel leads to the Griffiths Glacier. At a little less than a kilometre long, this is the largest ice feature in the area.

Access: Travel up the glacier is easy, but there are a number of small crevasses. From Gifford Stream, follow an easy scree gully then snow slopes to the saddle.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

P279

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SER
South East Ridge
Grade .75
From Griffiths Saddle follow easy snow slopes on the Gifford side of the ridge up to a flat area on the Main Divide.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 0
A short rock ridge, which is not difficult from Griffiths Saddle.
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From Gifford Stream
Grade 0
From Gifford Stream gain snow slopes on the east of the peak. From here several options exist to the summit.

Showing all routes 13 routes total

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Alpine - 13 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

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Access: This saddle is easily reached from Gifford Stream but there is no easy descent to the west. This saddle has no easy approach from the Crawford branch of the Kokatahi River. Descending, a line out of Farquharson Creek, onto the spur on the true right and then heading down towards Top Crawford Hut, may work. The saddle itself is easily approached from the gravel basin at the head of Farquharson Creek, and Gifford Stream provides easy, if boring, gravel access from the Wilberforce. The area around Farquharson Saddle is an interesting place to camp in fine weather, with water available in creeks draining the Retreat Snowfield.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

P279 0

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Farquharson Saddle
Grade 0
From Farquharson Saddle the Main Divide offers an easy approach to Mt Keddell. Later in the season there is a tarn 100 metres south of Pt 1816 metres near the ridge.
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From Griffiths Saddle
Grade 0
From Griffiths Saddle an equally easy route heads north across a snow basin to the Main Divide to reach the rocks of Mt Keddell.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Farquharson Saddle
Grade 0
From Farquharson Saddle follow a broad ridge south of Retreat Snowfield to join the North Ridge to the summit.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Farquharson Saddle
Grade 0
From below Farquharson Saddle, traverse south-east to the summit.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Farquharson Saddle
Grade 0
From below Farquharson Saddle, traverse south-east to the summit.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 1825 m

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Access: From Hall Creek, gravel, scree and snow slopes lead up to Hall Col. Cross over to the Retreat Snowfield on the north-west corner of the col. Walk down scree then scramble down a short section of rock into a snow gully leading out onto the main snowfield. The Retreat Snowfield still includes permanent ice and contains small slots, but its size is considerably reduced, particularly to the south.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

P280

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

RS
From Retreat Snowfield
Grade 1
Reach the Retreat Snowfield from either Farquharson Saddle or Hall Col. At about the 1700- metre contour, swing north-west up snow slopes towards a rib. A diagonal gully now leads right to give easy access to the East Ridge at about 2000 metres.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
The East Ridge is a rocky scramble, but gaining it from Hall Col involves broken, gnarly gendarmes. The first ascent party descended along the Main Divide to the Hall Glacier and returned to the Gifford via Hall Col.
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North Ridge
Grade 0
The North Ridge is loose in places and has a very unpleasant, actively eroding gash about 200 metres from the summit. However, the north-eastern slopes of the mountain are simple rock scrambles in summer from the head of the Crawford Valley. Access up the stream bed beyond Crawford Bivvy is relatively easy all the way to the Main Divide.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2066 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge
Grade 0
From Griffiths Saddle, traverse below Mt Camsell and follow the straightforward North Ridge to the top. Alternatively, from the lower Griffiths Glacier, head up a small glacier that joins the North Ridge.
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North East Ridge
Grade 0
From Gifford Stream gain the long North East Ridge and follow this to the rocky summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2088 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge
Grade 0
The North Ridge can be reached via a steep hike from the upper Griffiths Stream to snow slopes immediately south of Mt Scott.
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From Gifford Stream
Grade 0
Take the long spur from the valley floor to a narrow ridge of loose rock. Veer right, cross the lower glacier and then follow steep rock to the higher glacier and finally rotten rock to the top.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1911 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 0
From Griffiths Stream, follow the side creek draining Mt Ethel, aiming for the South East Ridge, and follow this to the top.

Showing all routes 12 routes total

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Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 16

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Access: Travel is straightforward.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 12 routes total Time 6-8hrs 2116 m

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Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 16
Ap027 0Mtspeightseface

Mt Speight was first climbed by Roger Chester, R E McInnes and H C Wickett in April 1930. Mt Speight Buttress has some of the best quality rock in the Arthurs Pass National Park.

Access: From the Waimakariri River access via Harper Creek. Follow Harper creek until reaching and impassable waterfall. Turn left up steep snow (or scree) gulley, be mindful of avalanche and rockfall. Trending left towards the top of the gulley. Upon reaching the ridge, drop onto the southern side and sidle towards Mt Speight. Allow 6-8 hours from Klondyke Corner.

Attribution: Gramae Kates. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Camp Mum Couloir
Grade 4
150m
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North East Ridge
Grade 0

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Mtspeight routes

Mt Speight is not often (if ever) visited by persons purely interested in climbing on rock. It hardly attracts day visitors, being a 6-hour tramp in from Klondyke Corner. But the 250m high Speight Buttress is blessed with some of the best quality rock in the national park (this all being relative, of course!). Three prominent rock buttresses protrude into the Speight snowfield. Many more routes could be contrived on the day. The gullies between them are climbable in winter. Descent is by the North Ridge to the col at the head of the snowfield.

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North Icefield Couloir
Grade 0

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Left-hand Buttress
Grade 0

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North Ridge Snow Chute
Grade 0

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Central Buttress
Grade 0

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Right-hand Buttress
Grade 0

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Normal Route
Grade 0

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North Ridge from Harper Creek
Grade 0

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From Headwaters of Burnett Stream
Grade 0
From the head-waters of Burnet Stream. Ascend the scree/snow-slope north of the creek that drains Speight’s West Face. A steep pitch joins the permanent snow-slope (beware of bergschrunds) that leads to the prominent col north of Mt Speight. Follow the ridge to the summit.
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North Ridge from Burnett Stream
Grade 0
From the head of Burnett Stream climb scree and rock to a small glacier that leads to the North Ridge of Mt Speight. Scramble along loose rock to the summit.
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South-East Face Direct
Grade 4
350m

Showing all routes 13 routes total

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Alpine - 13 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75

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Access: The Avoca River is the major tributary of the Harper River, which in turn flows into the Wilberforce (and also Lake Coleridge via the Harper River Diversion). The lower reaches pass through pleasant tramping country, but the head of the river is surrounded by several larger peaks, including Mt Avoca, Mt Gizeh and the popular but challenging Mt Greenlaw. Huts Unnamed hut 3.5 km south of Basins Hut : Glenthorn Station (private) Basins Hut and the hut to the north : both Glenthorn Station (private) Avoca Hut (CUTC) : A six-bunk hut. Avoca River access To reach the mountains at the head of the Avoca River, many people avoid a long walk up the valley by travelling up the Waimakariri River and crossing Gizeh Col (or other cols) at the head of the Anti Crow River (see the NZAC Arthur’s Pass guidebook). However, both walking and driving options are feasible up the Avoca Valley itself. Access by 4WD is possible at least as far as the confluence with Amphitheatre Creek. Ask Glenthorne Station (phone 03 318 5801) for permission and call in at the homestead to pay for use of the road. A good 4WD track initially follows the Harper River but then turns north into the Avoca Valley and reaches the old homestead at Lilian Creek. From here the track continues north briefly, before crossing to the true left of the river and continuing upstream until a small gorge is reached. Find a suitable point to re-cross to the true right, pick up the 4WD track and continue to Basins Hut. The track can be boggy in the vicinity of Basins Hut. From here head down to the Avoca River, re-cross and pick up the 4WD track that climbs on to a terrace on the true left of the river and continues to Amphitheatre Creek. This is a good place to park. Keen drivers can continue upstream, negotiating boulders and crossing the river when necessary, as far as river flats 500 metres west of Easy Stream. If travelling on foot, it is possible to cut around the western side of Mt Fitzwilliam to join the Avoca River. Continue upstream, crossing where required, until within a few hundred metres of Avoca Hut. Look for a well-marked track on the true right, which cuts through the bush and leads to the hut. To get to Moraine Flat and beyond, go down to the Avoca River and head upstream, bushbashing a little to reach the moraine. There is camping here, but water is generally found only in side creeks.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 5 routes total 2315 m

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Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Greenlaw

Lying just outside the national park boundaries, Mt Greenlaw is a sought-after peak, being the second highest in the area (after Mt Murchison) and has a reputation as a challenging climb. The North East Face is the standard route to the summit, whether approaching from the Waimakariri or Avoca Rivers.

Attribution: Gramae Kates. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Anti Crow River
Grade 0
Mt Greenlaw is the best climb from the head of the Anti Crow River. The usual route crosses Gizeh Col and descends to the upper Avoca Valley, then ascends the bluffs to the Avoca Glacier and the North East Face route. A longer, more varied route crosses Fools Col to Avoca Col, then follows a broken ridge to Greenlaw Col. From the col, either continue along the North Ridge, or traverse the snowfield and climb the North East Face.
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North Ridge
Grade 0
Gain the Avoca Glacier as for the North East Face route. The north ridge can be reached from the glacier at various points and followed to the summit, but this is a loose, jagged and time-consuming option.
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North East Face
Grade 2
From Moraine Flat, head upstream and ascend scree slopes to the base of bluffs below the Avoca Glacier. Several routes are possible through the bluffs, which involve straightforward rock climbing and scrambling on reasonably good rock. From the top of the bluffs, cross the Avoca Glacier, heading south-west towards the summit of Mt Greenlaw, avoiding gendarmes and loose rock on the north ridge. The rock on the summit of Mt Greenlaw is notoriously loose. At the end of the glacier, rather than join the north ridge, traverse south slightly on to marginally better rock on a rib that leads directly to the summit. Follow this to the top. The east ridge can be gained at about half height from the Avoca Glacier.
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South Face
Grade 0
Straightforward mixed climbing from the Avoca Valley.
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From Burnett Stream
Grade 0
About 4 km from Weka-Burnett Bivouac take a prominent scree gully south of Pt 1598 metres. From the head of the scree traverse north to avoid bluffs and aim for the base of a broad ramp leading to the summit. Scramble over the last steep loose rock to the top. This route is tricky when there is no consolidated snow.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2131 m

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Attribution: Gramae Kates. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Via Mt Greenlaw
Grade 0
Mt Avoca can be reached via Mt Greenlaw using the very jagged joining ridge.
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From Avoca River
Grade 1
Pick a route on scree through steep rock and bluffs, initially making a rising traverse to the north-west, to reach the glacier north-east of the summit of Mt Avoca. From here gain the North East Ridge and climb loose rock to the top.
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From Burnett Stream
Grade 0
About 4 km from Weka-Burnett Bivouac take a prominent scree gully south of Pt 1598 metres. From the head of the scree traverse north to avoid bluffs and aim for the base of a broad ramp leading to the summit. Scramble over the last steep loose rock to the top. This route is tricky when there is no consolidated snow.

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2022 m

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A rock, scree and snow slope peak, climbed preferably from a high camp in the basins at the head of the Anti Crow River.

Attribution: Gramae Kates. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Anti Crow River
Grade 0

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From Avoca River
Grade 1
A straightforward climb if care is taken to avoid a deep gash in the ridge.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2162 m

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Mt Gizeh was first climbed by John Pascoe, R E (Gran) Clark and A G Flower in 1930. A rock, scree and snow slope peak, climbed preferably from a high camp in the basins at the head of the Anti Crow River.

Attribution: Gramae Kates. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Anti Crow River
Grade 0

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North Ridge
Grade 1
A straightforward ridge climb from Gizeh Col.
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From Echo Col
Grade 1
A short simple climb.