Alpine - 211 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+
Trad - 22 routes - avg. grade 18 0 - 16 17 - 21 22 - 25
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 16 0 - 16

The eastern Two Thumb Range sits on the true right of the Rangitata River. Significant peaks extend from Graf Spee, at the head of The Growler (a tributary of the Havelock River), to Mt Caton at the head of Black Birch Creek. Havelock River access A DOC car park exists just beyond Mesopotamia Station and all 2WD cars should be left there. River conditions permitting, 4WDs can be taken beyond Mesopotamia Station as far as the confluence with Eric Stream, providing vehicle access to St Winifred Hut and Eric (Agony Island) Bivouac. Contact the station to get up-to-date river conditions (Malcolm and Sue Prouting, phone 03 696 3738). The usual route follows a reasonable 4WD track to the vicinity of Carneys Creek and then crosses to the middle of the riverbed to pick up the track to Curtis Memorial Hut (opposite the Forbes River). From here the route continues up the true left until opposite St Winifred Hut. A more difficult route also exists on the true right until Mistake Flats and the Mistake Flats Hut are reached. The shortest distance to travel on foot leaves from Erewhon Station but in this case the Clyde River must be crossed. Permission to cross station land should be obtained from Erewhon Station (Colin and Christine Drummond, phone 03 303 9739) and details left in the intentions book held at Huts Dog Kennel Hut (DOC) : A two-person bivvy in Black Birch Stream. Crooked Spur Hut (DOC) : An eight-person hut in Bush Stream. Black Mountain Hut (Mesopotamia Station) : Can be booked ; ask the station for permission.

Access: The Havelock River catchment provides access to a range of straightforward peaks on the Main Divide, the Cloudy Peak Range and also the glaciated peaks of the northern Two Thumb Range including the challenging Mt D’Archiac. The alpine rock climbing on the south-western aspects of Cloudy Peak is also accessed from the Havelock River. Many peaks of the eastern Two Thumb Range are best reached from a camp in North East Gorge Stream, but some of the more prominent peaks such as Alma and The Thumbs are frequently reached from the Rangitata side via Alma Stream and Black Birch Creek. Alma Col (2139m) and Cassandra Col (2307m) allow access from the east to the more westerly peaks and routes. The eastern Two Thumb Range is generally free of snow in summer and approaches involve relentless scree slogs to reach the rocky ridges that lead to the summits. Some snow coverage usually provides nicer access. The eastern Two Thumb Range sits on the true right of the Rangitata River. Significant peaks extend from Graf Spee, at the head of The Growler (a tributary of the Havelock River), to Mt Caton at the head of Black Birch Creek. Many peaks of the eastern Two Thumb Range are best reached from a camp in North East Gorge Stream, but some of the more prominent peaks such as Alma and The Thumbs are frequently reached from the Rangitata side via Alma Stream and Black Birch Creek. Alma Col (2139m) and Cassandra Col (2307m) allow access from the east to the more westerly peaks and routes. The eastern Two Thumb Range is generally free of snow in summer and approaches involve relentless scree slogs to reach the rocky ridges that lead to the summits. Some snow coverage usually provides nicer access. See North East Gorge Stream Huts Dog Kennel Hut (DOC) : A two-person bivvy in Black Birch Stream. Crooked Spur Hut (DOC) : An eight-person hut in Bush Stream. Black Mountain Hut (Mesopotamia Station) : Can be booked ; ask the station for permission. Several Havelock Valley huts can be used as climbing bases from which to access the wider area. There are no alpine huts, and high bivvys are often used for climbs of Mt D’Archiac and the more time-consuming routes on other peaks. Growler Hut (DOC) : An eight-bunk concrete block hut hidden in matagouri and not visible from the riverbed, but the old 4WD track leads straight to it. Forbes Bivouac (DOC) : A standard two-person bivvy in the Forbes Valley, not easily visible from the riverbed. Curtis Memorial Hut (DOC) : A four-person hut on the true left of the Havelock River. Mistake Flats Hut (DOC) : An eight-bunk hut situated at the back of the flats near forest at the confluence of the Forbes and Havelock Rivers. St Winifred Hut (CMC) : A nine-bunk hut with a mountain radio and solar lights. It is situated at the confluence of the Havelock River and St Winifred Stream. Both these watercourses can be difficult to cross after heavy rain. Eric Bivouac / Agony Island Bivouac (CMC) : This bivvy is located on Agony Island and is officially called Eric Bivouac, although it is named Agony Island Bivouac on map sheets 260-I35 / BX18. A basic, but good, weatherproof shelter, it is not derelict as indicated on those maps. Sleeps four or more on the floor. Veil Bivouac (DOC) : A basic two-person bivvy. Finlay Face Hut, shown on map sheets 260-I35 / BX18, has been destroyed by an avalanche. Rangitata & Havelock Rivers, access A DOC car park exists just beyond Mesopotamia Station and all 2WD cars should be left there. River conditions permitting, 4WDs can be taken beyond Mesopotamia Station as far as the confluence with Eric Stream, providing vehicle access to St Winifred Hut and Eric (Agony Island) Bivouac. Contact the station to get up-to-date river conditions (Malcolm and Sue Prouting, phone 03 696 3738). The usual route follows a reasonable 4WD track to the vicinity of Carneys Creek and then crosses to the middle of the riverbed to pick up the track to Curtis Memorial Hut (opposite the Forbes River). From here the route continues up the true left until opposite St Winifred Hut. A more difficult route also exists on the true right until Mistake Flats and the Mistake Flats Hut are reached. The shortest distance to travel on foot leaves from Erewhon Station but in this case the Clyde River must be crossed. Permission to cross station land should be obtained from Erewhon Station (Colin and Christine Drummond, phone 03 303 9739) and details left in the intentions book held at the homestead. Cross the Clyde River – always swift, prone to flooding and very seldom an easy crossing – and follow the north bank of the Havelock River until Freezing Point. Cross the river here to reach Mistake Flats Hut. If travelling further upstream, stay on the true left until opposite St Winifred Stream and cross somewhere here to reach St Winifred Stream and hut. If walking upstream from Mistake Flats, cross to the true left of the Havelock River to avoid a twokilometre section on the true right where the river abuts scrubby bluffs. Re-cross the river opposite St Winifred Stream to access St Winifred Stream and hut. If it is not possible to cross at Mistake Flats, a route exists in bush on the true right above the river, but it is airy in places with steep scrubby guts at the St Winifred Hut end. Travel further upstream beyond St Winifred Hut and Eric / Agony Island Bivouac involves passing above a long shallow gorge north of Veil Bivouac before the headwaters are reached but is generally straightforward. At the head of the valley, Disappointment Saddle provides access to peaks to the north and the Gardens of Eden and Allah. Bush Stream There is a marked DOC tramping route up Bush Stream, which provides partial access to straightforward climbs of Mt Caton, Pt 2303 metres and Mt Pattison.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2336 m

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Sword Peak is prominent when seen from near McDonald / Curtis Memorial Hut and gives good views from its summit.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 2
Climb the Scabbard Glacier to the col between Sword and Milne Peaks and follow the South East Ridge to the top. The last 100 metres presents the best climbing. The South East Ridge has also been approached from the Havelock River, beginning 600 metres up from Veil Bivouac. Steep scrub blends into good tussock benches on a spur south-east of the marked 40-metre waterfall, leading to the Milne–Sword ridge
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North Ridge
Grade 2
From the upper Havelock River follow a tussock and rock ridge leading to the snow basin north of Sword Peak and climb this to the Main Divide. Traverse a bump at the foot of the North Ridge and the steep but broken rock slabs. Continue up, passing an ice bulge on the west and follow the summit ridge along snow.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2093 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South Ridge
Grade 1
An easy scramble from Eric Stream.
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North Ridge
Grade 1
From the col between Sword and Milne Peaks climb easy rock to the summit.
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South East Ridge
Grade 1
From the Havelock River climb through grassy bluffs, following snow gullies where possible. Eventually a snowfield is reached that leads to the South East Ridge. Follow the ridge, which is slabby and loose near the summit.

Showing all routes 3 routes total 2319 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade 2
Climb the small tributary of the Havelock Glacier, avoiding seracs, aiming for open snow terraces above. From here gain the broad ridge of the Main Divide north of Pt 2140 metres. Follow the Divide, negotiating several rock and snow towers near the summit.
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Havelock Face
Grade 0
From the lower Havelock Glacier follow a glacial lead around a large buttress, and then follow its north branch directly to the summit. This route has deteriorated since it was first climbed, leaving remnant icecliffs in place of continuous snow. The route is now very difficult.
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North East Ridge
Grade 1.75
From Havelock Col follow the Divide via Pt 2269 metres, negotiating straightforward rock guts on good rock on the western side.
Alpine - 16 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75

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Access: The lower part of Black Birch Creek is gorged in two sections. The lower section of gorge can be followed in, or close to, the stream bed, briefly using a short section of trail on the true right. The upper section of gorge should usually be avoided by climbing 50 metres or so up a scree slope and traversing the bushy slopes of Mt Brabazon, keeping high on the true right. Once out of the bush, descend a small spur down to river flats and beech forest in upper Black Birch Creek. The south branch of Black Birch Creek provides access to Tom Thumb Col and hence The Thumbs and Split Peaks, while the north branch provides access to The Thumbs, Priam, Myrmidon, Achilles and Cassandra Col. Inkerman Saddle is a snow-grass and scree saddle providing ready access between Alma and Black Birch Creeks.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75
The%20thumbs

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SR
South Ridge of the Low Thumb 2505m
Grade 1.75
The col between the high and low Thumbs is readily accessed from the west. From the col pick a route through steep, loose argillite to the summit, climbing a narrow, leftfacing corner if conditions dictate.
NF
North Face of the High Thumb
Grade 2
The col between the high and low Thumbs is readily reached from the west. From the col, cross a band of argillite then zigzag along ascending ledges. Finish by climbing either blocky rock or a scree gully on the right to the broad summit. The rock is reasonably firm.
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South Ridge of the High Thumb
Grade 2
and narrow gullies but joins the South Ridge near the summit, avoiding deep chasms and steep walls at the south end of the ridge. Climb the steepening ridge, taking occasional detours to the west side of the arête and negotiating a short step just before the summit. Alternatively, the South Ridge is readily reached via scree from the western side of the col north of Pt 2315 metres.
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Low Thumb, East Ridge
Grade 1.75
This is best approached from the north branch of Black Birch Creek but can also be reached via steep couloirs from the south. From the col slightly north-east of the peak, pick a gully to access the East Ridge and follow the ridge to the summit.
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Low Thumb, North Buttress
Grade 1
From head basin of Black Birch Creek climb a series of bluffs to gain the summit ridge about 200 metres horizontally from the top, then follow the ridge.
Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75
Split%20pk

Split Peaks are two prominent peaks of approximately equal height forming a heart-shaped outline when seen from Two Thumb Stream. They form blocky buttresses and prominent ribs of variable to good rock, potentially producing routes up to 150 metres long. The easiest access is from adjacent cols, which lead to short scrambles of a few tens of metres of height gain. A traverse of the entire ridge from Tom Thumb Col to the col north of Mt Caton is yet to be completed and would involve negotiating a steep gendarme at the northern end and some short, steep faces. Split Peaks were first climbed by Bill Cullens, Stan Forbes and Frank Gillett in December 1934. The party had set out to climb The Thumbs but in the absence of any good maps or route descriptions they set off in error up Split Peaks. A view from high on the route revealed their mistake.

Access: The cols north, south and between north and south Spilt Peaks can be reached via steep scree or snow, via Black Birch Creek.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

This spot height forms the northern high point of the Split Peaks ridge.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge
Grade 2
At the northern end of the ridge climb an argillite gully that narrows and steepens and reaches the ridge on loose argillite immediately south of a prominent gendarme. Follow loose rock along the narrow ridge to the summit.
SF
South Face
Grade 2
Climb a gully immediately south of the summit and then the steep slab to the top.
NR
North Split Peak, North Ridge
Grade 1.75
From the broad, prominent scree slope that leads to the col on the northern side of the Split Peaks, traverse along a short ledge to a loose, rocky gully. Follow this gully to the summit.
SR
North Split Peak, South Ridge
Grade 1.75
Start by climbing the broad, prominent scree slope, aiming towards the col on the northern side of the Split Peaks. Well before the col, climb a steep, narrow, rocky gully that emerges from between the buttresses of the Split Peaks. After a short step, this gully leads to a narrow col between the Split Peaks. From here, clamber over steeply-stacked loose blocks to the summit.
NhR
South Split Peak, North Ridge
Grade 2
Gain the narrow col between the two Split Peaks (see South Ridge of North Pk, route above). Climb a short slab and loose rock to the summit.
ShR
South Split Peak, South Ridge
Grade 1.75
Climb a steepening gully immediately south of the peak, to a small col. Negotiate a short step before moving right and climbing loose rock and boulders to the summit.

South end of Split Pks

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SPR
From Split Peak ridge
Grade 1.75
From the col on the ridge to the north, make a short steep scramble on the east side of the ridge to the summit

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North Ridge
Grade 1
Make a rocky ridge scramble to the summit from either of the two cols to the north. Pinnacles can be passed on either side of the ridge.
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West Face
Grade 1
Follow scree and snow-grass through small rock bluffs to reach the high basin immediately west of Mt Caton, and pick a route through blocky, rocky terrain to the top.
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South West Ridge
Grade 1
This is a scree walk to the summit, reached as part of a ridge traverse or via scrambling through small, loose, rocky bluffs directly up from Two Thumb Stream.
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North Ridge
Grade 1
A straightforward climb from Black Birch Creek. Alternatively, cross onto the western slopes and follow these to the summit.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

Alma Stream provides the usual access to Alma from the east via a straightforward tramp to Alma Col. This also provides ready access to Exeter and the western aspects of Achilles and Myrmidon.

Access: Alma Stream provides the usual access to Alma from the east via a straightforward tramp to Alma Col. This also provides ready access to Exeter and the western aspects of Achilles and Myrmidon.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 5 routes total 2510 m

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Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75
Alma

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SR
South Ridge
Grade 1.75
Follow Trojan Stream or Alma Stream, directly to Alma Col and climb loose rock straight up from the col. A bluff near the start of the route can be bypassed by a short, exposed traverse on a narrow ledge west of the ridge, or a rising traverse on loose rock on the east side. Either may require a rope. The south-west face can be used in good snow conditions.
EF
East Face
Grade 2.25
From the head of Alma Stream follow a snow gully directly to the summit. Not often in condition.
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North East Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Alma Stream climb to a prominent col on Alma Spur at 2100 metres, west of Pt 2205 metres. Drop into the valley to the north to avoid gendarmes, then regain the ridge and follow small scree and rock ledges to the summit
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North Face
Grade 0
From Balaclava Basins at the head of The Growler follow a prominent east-trending gut leading through the bluffs to join the North Ridge shortly below the summit.
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West Ridge
Grade 0
From Balaclava Basins at the head of The Growler, take a steep couloir leading to a col on the West Ridge and follow steep but straightforward rock to the summit.

Showing all routes 2 routes total

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Camp Creek provides a long approach to Graf Spee and points on the Two Thumb Range.

Access: Camp Creek provides a long approach to Graf Spee and points on the Two Thumb Range.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2267 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade .75
Make a straightforward climb to Plata Col, and then wander along the ridge in an upward direction.
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South East Ridge
Grade 1.25
Climb easy slopes to Balaclava Saddle at the head of North East Gorge Stream and from here scramble up the South East Ridge to the summit.
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Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

The Forbes River provides access to Mt D’Archiac and the minor peaks at the head of the valley

Access: The Forbes River provides access to Mt D’Archiac and the minor peaks at the head of the valley. It is also used for access to the Godley Valley via Twilight, Separation and Revelation Cols. With two minor scrub bashes, it is possible to travel on the true right all the way up to the South Forbes Glacier. Accommodation is in Forbes Bivouac, or there is camping 10 minutes above the forks, about 1 km past the bivvy. Forbes Bivouac (DOC) : A standard two-person bivvy in the Forbes Valley, not easily visible from the riverbed.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Between Mt D'Archiac & The Onlooker

Access: Use the Dennistoun Glacier for access. However, if glacial conditions in the lower reaches are not favourable then use its eastern fringe and traverse the lower slopes of The Commander.

Attribution: Alex Palman Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: ALex Palman Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Ridge
Grade 1.25
Access via the South Forbes Glacier can be tricky and is the crux of the climb. Once Revelation Col is reached, ascend easy rock directly to the summit.
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South East Ridge
Grade 1.25
Follow the ridge between the Forbes and South Forbes Glaciers, traversing the Forbes névé to the final rock ridge which is followed to the top.

Mt Forbes was first climbed by Hugh Wright and Jim Murphy in February 1912 during their return to Mt Cook after the first ascent of Mt Arrowsmith.

Attribution: Alex Palman, Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the Ballium Snowfield
Grade 0

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South Face
Grade 1.25
From the upper Macaulay River, reach the head of McKinnon Stream from the ridge north of Pt 2437 metres. Descend to the glacier and follow it to the summit.
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North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Twilight Col (see below) climb the rock ridge directly to the summit or, for an easier climb, sidle south across the upper Butcher Glacier and then up the west face.
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South East Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Murphy Stream access Murphy Glacier on the true right. Climb the steepening glacier to the summit or move on to the South East Ridge.

Two Thumb Range

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Forbes River
Grade 1.25
Follow the scree slope opposite Forbes Bivvy towards a rocky spur. After following this for a short distance, cross to the snowfield and follow the narrow south ridge to the top.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

St Winifred Stream provides straightforward access to Terra Nova Pass and peaks on the Main Divide. The lower valley is scrubby and travel is best in the stream bed on the true left, but the true right can also be used.

Access: St Winifred Stream provides straightforward access to Terra Nova Pass and peaks on the Main Divide. The lower valley is scrubby and travel is best in the stream bed on the true left, but the true right can also be used.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

Steep terrain on both sides of the col prevents its use as a crossing point. Terra Nova Pass to the south is used instead.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

McClure Peak is at the junction of the Two Thumb Range and the Main Divide and stands out as a perfect snow pyramid when looking up the Havelock Valley from the vicinity of Black Mountain Hut. McClure Peak was first climbed from Terra Nova Pass by Jack Lippe and Will Kennedy, February 1925.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club Alex Palman.

SR
South Ridge
Grade 1.75
From Terra Nova Pass, follow the ridge to Saint Winifred Col. From here climb snow and rock, bypassing a large rock buttresses on the eastern side.
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West Face
Grade 1.25
From the upper Godley Glacier head up a tributary glacier to the Main Divide west of the peak. The West Face is fairly broad with relatively easy rock and scree slopes. This tributary glacier is likely to be cut off by crevasses at times, especially later in the season. A variation on this route has been used, approaching from Stewart Pass along the Main Divide snows of Malthus and Dennistoun. A second variation of this route is to approach from Dummy Col up the shingle bed of Eric Stream from the Havelock Valley. From Dummy Col, continue to Hidden Col, then cross snowslopes to a rib at about 2120m giving access to the same West Face.
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North Ridge
Grade 1.75
From Hidden Col climb the glacier north of McClure Peak. At its head, follow a steepening couloir almost directly to the summit, or move on to shattered rock either side of the couloir.
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From Terra Nova Pass
Grade 0
From Terra Nova Pass climb the snow and rock south ridge, avoiding large rock buttresses on the eastern side, regaining the ridge about 200m from the summit. This is more difficult than it looks.
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Unnamed
Grade 0
Climb directly from the head of the Godley using a tributary glacier to access the Main Divide west of the summit.

Eric Stream provides quick, gravelly access to Dennistoun Pass and peaks on the Main Divide

Access: Eric Stream provides quick, gravelly access to Dennistoun Pass and peaks on the Main Divide

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 1 route total 2145 m

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Named after Noel E Odell, honorary member of NZAC. Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Attribution: Peter E. Odell, NZTopo 50

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South and North Ridges
Grade 1.25
Straightforward climbing. The original ascent involved a north to south traverse of the peak.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North East and South West Ridges
Grade 1.75
Reach the summit ridges from the vicinity of Eric Twins or Dennistoun Pass and follow to the summit. The original ascent involved a traverse of the peak.

2123m and 2137m

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Main Divide Ridges
Grade 1.25
Straightforward climbing along the Main Divide, first completed as a north-south traverse.
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East Ridge
Grade 1
Head up the glacier leading to Gunn Pass and follow the East Ridge, which merges with the face of the lower Eric Twin. The higher Twin is reached via the straightforward Main Divide ridge.

A small gorge in Veil Stream can be bypassed by climbing about 100 metres to a ledge on the northern side, if river conditions dictate.

Access: A small gorge in Veil Stream can be bypassed by climbing about 100 metres to a ledge on the northern side, if river conditions dictate.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Showing all routes 2 routes total 2028 m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Havelock River
Grade 1
From the Havelock River climb directly up on to the western slopes, aiming for the west ridge. A 20-metre wall on the ridge can be turned or bypassed by climbing a steep chimney. A second step is easily sidled to the south on snow.
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From Veil Stream
Grade 1
A 900-metre slog from Veil Stream leads to Orb Col. From the basin below the col several options exist to reach the summit.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South Ridge
Grade 1
After slogging up from Veil Stream, the south ridge provides an easy climb to the summit.

Showing all routes 184 routes total

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Alpine - 161 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+
Trad - 22 routes - avg. grade 18 0 - 16 17 - 21 22 - 25
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 16 0 - 16

The Clyde River and its tributaries offer access to a wide range of country including the Cloudy Peak Range, peaks on the Main Divide, and the Froude and Jollie Ranges. The Clyde River also provides the usual approach to the Gardens of Eden and Allah and the Armoury Range. The Frances River and McCoy Stream drain the head of the catchment and merge downstream at McCoy Hut to form the Clyde River. The Sinclair River is a large tributary bisecting the Armoury and Jollie Ranges. The Lawrence River is a major tributary of the Clyde

Access: The Clyde River and its tributaries offer access to a wide range of country including the Cloudy Peak Range, peaks on the Main Divide, and the Froude and Jollie Ranges. The Clyde River also provides the usual approach to the Gardens of Eden and Allah and the Armoury Range. The Frances River and McCoy Stream drain the head of the catchment and merge downstream at McCoy Hut to form the Clyde River. The Sinclair River is a large tributary bisecting the Armoury and Jollie Ranges. The Lawrence River is a major tributary of the Clyde. Huts and bivvys Erewhon Station Hut (private) Broadleaf Hut, Erewhon Station (private) : Not named on map sheets J35 and BX18, this hut is situated on the true right of the Clyde approximately halfway between Kea Spur and Armada Bluff. Watchdog Hut (DOC) : A basic four-bunk hut. McCoy Hut (DOC) : A basic six-bunk hut. Agnes Bivouac : A rock bivvy augmented with some tin, sited on the north side of Agnes Stream. Not weather proof. Several tent platforms also exist here. Sinclair Bivvy : A four-person weatherproof rock bivvy on the true left of the Sinclair River, sitting above the riverbed (J35 347567 / BW18 247 951). Clyde River access The Clyde River is reached from Erewhon Station. Permission to cross station land should be obtained from Colin and Christine Drummond (phone 03 303 9739) and details left in the intentions book at the homestead. A 4WD track is followed for about 10 minutes before the Clyde riverbed is reached. In recent years the main braids of the river have been migrating towards the true left of the valley, now necessitating a crossing of the Clyde River before going any distance up the Clyde or Lawrence Valleys. However, this section of river is highly changeable and information on the latest conditions should be obtained from the runholders. The Clyde River is always swift and floods easily ; it is very seldom an easy crossing. Occasionally, in good conditions, 4WD access may be possible to the river flats beyond Black Bluff. Cross the Clyde River soon after leaving the homestead and pick a route through the river braids, on the true right of the main river. Head north upriver and find a suitable crossing somewhere around the southern end of a large grassy island, generally aiming towards Erewhon Station Hut, and continue on the true left. When travelling on foot follow a similar but more direct route, crossing back to the true left before Black Bluff is reached : boulders and a confined channel usually exclude crossing upstream towards Armada Bluff. If necessary, make a slow, hard scramble through scrub and spaniards on Armada Bluff. Black Bluff should present no problems on foot unless the river channel moves to flow hard against the bluff. If this is the case, a climb of at least 800 metres over the bluff may be required. If going to McCoy Hut, continue on the true left of the Clyde to McCoy Stream and cross opposite the hut. If it is too deep and swift, continue up McCoy Stream for another kilometre to where the stream braids, and cross there. If bypassing McCoy Hut and continuing up the Frances River, start looking for a river crossing anywhere north of Armada Bluff. However, the best crossing of the Frances is just above McCoy Hut, upstream of where the river cuts into bedrock. The bedrock is fairly easily sidled along the riverbank.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75
P208P212

At the heart of the Adams Wilderness, and situated entirely west of the Main Divide, these Ice Plateaus extend east-west semi-continuously for approx 15km, at an elevation of 1800m to 2200m. The Garden of Eden is approx 9km long. For over 70 years the area has been the focus of transalpine climbing parties, and it was an early one of these that provided the name. 'This neve area on part of the Adams Range was named the Garden of Eden', wrote John Pascoe in the 1935 New Zealand Alpine Journal (page 143) acknowledging in the The Canterbury Mountaineer 1934/1935 that AP Thomson in their party inspired the name. Routes through the area have often been as important as the climbing objectives, and this guide provides information on those routes as well as the climbing. Many of the climbs from the plateaus are relatively easy.

Access: The main access to the Gardens from the east is Perth Col via the Clyde Branch of the Rangitata River. This is the easiest overall access but is dependent on Clyde River conditions. The Clyde is often uncrossable, especially in spring with snowmelt. It has usually dropped to crossable levels by late Jan or Feb. From the west, there are two main approaches to the Gardens. One is via the Wanganui Valley and Lambert Spur, sidling to the Lambert Glacier. The other is via the Perth Branch of the Whataroa River. See the Whataroa and Wanganui Valleys amongst others for those access details.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

From the col between the Backbone and Mt Farrar, steep rock leads to the top of the Devils Backbone. A snow couloir descends to a col west, then loose rock leads to the highest point on the Vertebrae. However, reasonable rock exists at various places on the points of the backbone. The highest peaks on the Devils Backbone were climbed after an ascent of Mt Farrar by Peter Bain and Colin Burrows, 7 Jan 1953.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

P208 1

Captain Farrar was a member of the English Alpine Club in the 1920s?

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

AC
From Angel Col
Grade 1.25
A snow climb that varies with the seasons. Slots can cut access at times. When in good condition, usually earlier in the season, this route also offers good access to Iceland Col, Mts Kensington and Hulka. The top of the peaks are small rock scrambles.
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From the Arethusa Glacier
Grade 1.25
The Arethusa Glacier has a couple of icefalls that need to be passed. See the Arethusa Glacier notes above. From the 1940m contour, the usual route is to sidle up snowslopes onto a shoulder off Mt Hulka and cut back south east onto the plateau. A short steeper scramble on rock and gravel leads to the highpoint at 2424m. Between the icefalls in the Arethusa, it is sometimes possible to head south up the true right of an icefall that drains Hulka and Farrar, offering a more direct approach to the plateau north west of Mt Farrar.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 1
A straight forward snow plod from the Garden of Eden.
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North West Ridge
Grade 0
Climb tussock benches and scree, leading to easy snow slopes higher on the ridge. These two routes on Barlow have been used as a transalpine route to the Garden of Eden from the Barlow, offering a route with less threat from stonefall than Vertebrae Col.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Ridge
Grade 1
Follow a mix of straightforward rock and snow to the summit
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East Ridge
Grade 0
This steep ridge of poor rock was climbed by Jack Pattle, probably solo, in 1939 or 1940. Miss Irving accompanied Jack up the valley but is thought not to have climbed the route.

between Pt 2327 & Newton Pk

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the Garden of Eden
Grade 1
Straight forward climbing from the Garden of Eden.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From the Garden of Eden
Grade 1
Snowslopes lead to the rocky summit ridge.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Western slopes
Grade 1
A straight forward snowplod and scramble from the Garden of Eden.
P208 0

In 1935 John Pascoe named this peak ' The Great Unknown because it was a 'cornerpost in a welter of new country'. From the Perth, The Great Unknown offers a great multi-day trip in its own right, while it is sometimes used as a transalpine route to and from the Garden of Eden.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

FP
From the Perth
Grade 1.25
From Scone Creek Hut, follow the track upvalley over Scone Creek bridge then cross the Perth bridge to the true right. Follow the riverbank and vestiges of the old FS track up to Redfield Creek. Begin up the creek, but it will be necessary to sidle past several falls, particularly above about the 800m contour. Both the stream above here and an alternative using the spur out to the true left have been used. You choose. Climb up the ridge towards pt 1684m. From this ridge there are two more alternatives. The first route sidles steep tussock from upper Redfield Creek at about the 1200m to 1300m contour across to another spur coming off pt 1684m bordering Elizabeth Stream and descends to flats in that stream at 1200m. There is good camping here. Cross Elizabeth Stream and ascend the spur on the true right where there are also campsites, with tarns, at about the 1500m contour. Continue towards pt 1898m, crossing to the north side of the ridge at about the 1800m contour and bypassing pt 1898m itself which is a bit gnarly. Sidle under pt 2024m across shingle, easy rock slabs and snow onto what's left of the Adverse Glacier, which isnt much. The second route sidles a little to the west of pt 1684m on a shelf between 1500m and 1600m before climbing through basins for a kilometre to reach the ridge between pt 1926m and pt 2024m. Continue over to the Adverse Glacier. Snowslopes and easy rock, including slabs, then lead to the summit of Great Unknown. Some have had crevasse problems on the Adverse, but normally there should be no problem. To continue to the Garden of Eden, go a short distance to the north west along a rock rib from the summit of Great Unknown and descend north north east towards a basin at the 1800m contour. Sidle at more or less this height through to the Gardens. Time: One very big day from the Gardens to Scone Hut. Allow 2 going up. Approached from the Perth using a mostly gravel slip stream beginning at I35 105583. This route utilised a cage across the Perth above the Barlow confluence, but the cage has long gone.
GE
From the Garden of Eden
Grade 1.25
From the Garden of Eden, sidle at roughly the 1760m contour on the north side of the ridge to a basin at 1800m. Head south, up a basin of rock and snow to reach the west ridge just before the summit. A scramble. Variations exist closer to the ridge, with more rock climbing involved.

Showing all routes 36 routes total 2403 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

Trad - 22 routes - avg. grade 18 0 - 16 17 - 21 22 - 25
Alpine - 14 routes - avg. grade 3 0 - 2.75 3+
Copy%20of%20cloudy%20pk

Cloudy Pk is the highest point on the Cloudy Peak Range. The routes on the Left Hand Wall are listed here.

Access: It’s 6 to 7 hours walk from Erewhon Station to the bivy in Cloudy Stream before the Hour Glass Wall. From the Havelock valley, start up slopes just before you come to Cloudy Stream until you get to flat ground just below the 900m contour. From here a track has been cut in the valley and is marked with white tape. It goes through open scrub initially, staying fairly low in the valley rather than going high, before picking its way through the thick stuff to finish on scree. There are a couple of bivy sites in the Cloudy Stream valley at about the 1140m contour. Running stream water can be found between rocks a few minutes down valley even in the driest of summer months.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Part of Cloudy Pk rock climbing area. First climbed by Bryan Barrer and Frank Askin, December 1931.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Zero the Hero
Grade 14
Climb left of the large chimney on the slabby north-west aspect of the peak.
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Central Chimney
Grade 0
Climb the large chimney.
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Bring Your Daughter to the Slaughter
Grade 10
Keep right of the chimney.
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South Ridge
Grade 0
The first ascent was ‘a hen-cackle’ – the climbers were aiming for Cloudy Peak.
Trad - 3 routes - avg. grade 15 0 - 16 17 - 21
Alpine - 2 routes - avg. grade 3 0 - 2.75 3+
Onslow%20buttress%20topo

Part of the Cloudy Pk, rock climbing area.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Onomatopoeia
Grade 3
250m The route starts at the base of the arete and follows this to the summit. Enters a 50m chimney at about half-height. Top pitch comes comes onto the left wall slightly to avoid a small roof (crux). Eight pitches. Descend by 5 x 50m abseils down the route.
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Creature Comfort
Grade 20, 20, 21, 20, 19, 14
17 Bolt Trad
1. 40m Move right to short corner, up this a few metres to 1st bolt on wall. Move onto face and climb seams passing another bolt. The seams angle slightly left and the route follows that line up the face. Passing a bolt in dark juggy rock, then another above a small ledge. From there the route goes straight up passing two more bolts, directly to belay bolts beneath 1st overhang. 6B, few extra runners can be used.
2. 40m Straight up past 2 bolts to obvious feature on the overhang. Slightly left-wards line up past a bolt and up to the ‘Witches Hat’. Straight up face to bolt then step left and up to V shaped ledge. Up right to bolt, then straight up through overhang to belay bolts beneath overhang.
3. 30m Move left up to bolt on face above overhang. Onto face and up to crack for runners, then move left and climb up to gain two seams heading up the face tending slightly right. Towards the top the left seam stops and the right seam becomes a crack. Belay bolts on ledge above this. Ample natural pro on face.
4. 45m Step left around corner onto face. Follow obvious left- wards rising traverse past 2B. Then up face tending slightly L, about ten metres to a bolt above a small ledge. Continue up same line to belay bolts in V shaped stance.
5. 45m Move left to bolt, then up seams to ledge. Directly up face past another bolt. Then tend slightly left- wards up face on juggy rock to belay bolts on major ledge.
6. 30m Climb juggy wall to gain corner about ten metres up. Follow up corner and over bulges. The angle eases above bulges. Final belay bolt is in the corner when level with terrace on right.
SL
Sky-Lab
Grade 15, 16, 20, 24, 10
16 Bolt Trad
1. 30m Start just right of gully, climb up then move right onto face and up. Face is sound, few runners. Up easy ground tending a little left to belay bolts on main ledge.
2. 30m From belay on ledge move right to belay bolts on face. Route climbs straight up from face belay. A bolt on the face is passed on its left. Up and right to gain the left- facing corner where cracks take runners. Up and right round corner, up to belay bolts beneath overhang.
3. 45m Climb overhang past 2B. Continue up left- facing corner (1B near top). Then up and tending right towards big left- facing corner. 1B in this corner marks the point to traverse right around onto face. Then up to belay bolts.
4. 48m Sustained. 11B. Straight up to 1st bolt. Above 1st bolt is a cam placement, then move left up to 2nd bolt. left and up to the 3rd bolt, then straight up face passing bolts. There are two wire placements at obvious points where bolts are spaced. At top of pitch move left to belay bolts. Use nut pick to remove wires.
5. 12m Climb easy face straight up to belay bolts on top.
OB
Onslow Buttress
Grade 14, 16, 15, 15, 6, 16, 16, 13, 12
1. Start a little right of the toe of the buttress and scramble up a bit to gain the crest. Straightforward climbing with spaced gear to reach a large platform with an old bolt station.
2. Nice climbing protected by microcams, with a committing move to the right after about 20 metres.
3. Continue up the right side, moving back to the crest for the belay.
4. Continue up the right side of the buttress.
5. Gain the lower-angled area and scramble a full pitch with no protection.
6. Belay under the overhang just right of the buttress and pull through on good holds. Nice climbing with good microcams.
7. Climb out left on to steep broken ground with good gear and protection, then above the ledge move up through big blocks on the right.
8. Broken ground with steeper sections and scrambling intermingled.
9. Mostly scrambling with a couple of steeper sections leading to the final top out on the pinnacle summit.
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North East Ridge
Grade 2.75
The first ascent was made from Broadleaf Hut. Once on the ridge the final 400 metres of rock are steep and tricky.
NR
North Ridge
Grade 1.25
Reach the Cloudy Peak divide, skirt below the middle peak and scramble to the top.
GR
Golly Rodger
Grade 16, 18, 16, 20, 17, 17, 14, 15, 13
1. 45m Left of belay is a recess in the face. Starting in this, climb up good rock tending slightly left to ledge. Then straight up overhang and face to main ledge and belay bolts.
2. 45m Tend left up face to ledge. Above is a steep wall with seams angling right. Follow seams to ledge and belay bolts.
3. 45m Straight up overhang, then the face above tending slightly right to a ledge. Then straight up face to belay bolts on ledge. Belay may be a little to your left when gaining ledge. Good sustained pitch.
4. 45m Step left and up weakness in the overhang. Then up and move right along seams to a small overlapping corner. Move around this corner and up tending right to ledge. Climb straight up face to next ledge, then tending left up face to belay bolts in recess.
5. 45m Just left of belay and straight up steep juggy line of weakness to ledge. Then on up face (slightly right). Belay bolts on ledge.
6. 50m Tend left up face to ledge. Above ledge head straight up towards small right-facing corner. Belay bolts just above. Sustained pitch.
7. 40m Up and right to follow weakness through overhang. Then back left and straight up face to ledge and belay bolts.
8. 30m Move left a bit to avoid overhang then up good juggy rock. Once established on face above keep a little left at 1st, moving right again when well up. Gain sloping ledge and bolts.
9. 50m The rock above belay looks a bit odd. Move right a few metres along ledge, then up face tending back left. Regain the line then barrel straight up juggy rock to the belay bolts. Above this the angle lies back to scrambling. Be careful to avoid snagged ropes if abseiling this pitch.
TG
The Groke
Grade 3.75, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1. Weave in and out of ledges and overhangs seeking the easiest route, towards the prominent line in the middle of the wall
2. As above.
3. As above.
4. From below the overhang move left and up around the overhang, then up a faint corner.
5. Continue up the wall following the weakness.
6. As above
7. Follow a faint crack to the upper overhang.
8. Through the upper overhang, and into a chimney.
9. Easy climbing leading to a scramble to the summit.
SWR
South West Ridge
Grade 3
150m Start just left of the ridge : scramble up a gully to a small left-facing corner opposite a prominent corner with a chimney. About four pitches of steep climbing, then a scramble to the summit of Cloudy Peak. Alternatively, traverse right and descend scree.

Showing all routes 6 routes total 2100 m

Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 3 3+
Trad - 1 route - avg. grade 21 17 - 21
Upper%20walls

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Access: To reach these routes, scramble up scree until you can traverse across the big shelf above the Hourglass Wall. Be aware that snow may be present on the summit and on the descent to the col between Cloudy and Ferrar Peaks.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

GP
The Great Prow
Grade 3.25, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
1. 350m Climb steep cracks with a small bulge about 15m up (crux).
2. Follow the line of the buttress on broken rock with deviations where necessary.
3. As above.
4. Move out right to avoid a smooth section, and then up short steep crack to rejoin the ridge.
5. Skirt the prominent overhang on the left.
6. Continue up, generally following the line of the Prow.
7. As above
8. From the crest move left into a steep, broken gully with grey rock, and follow the left crack.
9. Continue up the same line on easier rock to the shoulder of the Prow.
Ps
Prowess
Grade 3
350m The huge, smooth red wall.
MC
McC’s Crack
Grade 3
350m Takes the prominent chimney, although it’s often necessary to climb slabs on either side to avoid loose rock. About 11 pitches, with the climbing easier and the rock looser towards the top.
QD
The Quick and the Dead
Grade 4
200m Mixed climbing, thin ice, marginal pro. Five pitches.
ND
Needle Direct
Grade 3
200m The Needle is a striking feature of the bluffs below the South West Ridge, just right of the Great Prow. Scramble up scree gullies for about 50m to the start. Mostly climb the crack just left of the arête. Five ptiches. Abseil off the top into a rotten gully, then scramble to the main ridge.
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Windwhistle Arête
Grade 21
60m ‘Obvious sharp arête left of substantial face heading to the South West Ridge, two fixed pegs.’
Trad - 13 routes - avg. grade 19 0 - 16 17 - 21 22 - 25
Alpine - 1 route - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Ctr%26hourglass

The big wall, on the lower west side of Cloudy Pk.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Dm
Demondim
Grade 24
150m Start 100 metres left of the main corner below the Great Prow. Four pitches to the big ledge through the main overhang. Some bolts and bolt belays.
Ub
Unbeliever
Grade 22
180m Good wall climbing to reach grooves and then overhangs. Five pitches, some bolts, bolt belays.
MI
Mission Impossible
Grade 17
325m Eight pitches on the left of the wall : the first four climb up to and through the big roof ; the route then follows the prominent diagonal up and right, easier climbing but few runners.
MA
Mission Accomplished
Grade 19
300m This direct finish to the previous route makes a more sustained climb. Move left onto the face and up for four pitches, once the diagonal is reached.
BD
Big Dipper
Grade 0
300m Tackles the most impressive features on the wall : climb over three sets of overhangs to reach the big arch. Through this and across the big roof (crux, bolts) and straight up the wall above.
FR
Fiddler on the Roof
Grade 20
280m The first route through the spectacular overhangs on the left side of the wall. Nine pitches – the roof pitch and the wall above are very good. Finish up the Mission Impossible diagonal.
FL
When the Frog Lifts
Grade 17
80m Yup, frog. Two good pitches on the compact orange rock of the upper wall. Accessed by abseil.
SM
When the Snow Melts
Grade 21
300m ‘The line of greatest resistance.’ Sustained climbing up to and through the main overhang via corner systems at its right-hand end.
HL
Hourglass Left
Grade 19
300m The big natural line in the centre of the wall. Three good pitches (crux on first pitch) are followed by uninteresting climbing in loose, vegetated gullies and chimneys.
HR
Hourglass Right
Grade 16
300m The bottom right line of the ‘hourglass’ is sometimes loose and sometimes barely protectable.
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The Hourglass has Turned
Grade 19
300m
US
The United States in Mind
Grade 18
300m Some delightful climbing on a direct line, following the enigmatic left-facing feature.
Yg
Ytivarg
Grade 17
250m Five good pitches on sound rock, sometimes committing and exposed.
SA
Slip-sliding Away
Grade 15
200m Sustained and enjoyable, meandering but logical. Climb the right-hand side of the wall.
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East Flank
Grade 1.25
From the Clyde, head up a gully south-east of Mt Nolan and cross into the basin east of Cloudy Peak. Head directly towards the peak, swinging south onto the range at a flat area at 2120 metres (also readily reached from Cloudy Peak Stream), before continuing up small bluffs then scree.
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South East Ridge
Grade 1.25

SL
Silver Lining
Grade 23, 18, 16
1. 35m Just right of the arete, a crack line goes through 2 overhanging bulges. Sustained and well protected climbing to large ledge system.
2. 45m An immaculate splitter crack going up the next wall.
3. 25m Move left to another shorter splitter crack.

Showing all routes 1 route total 1884 m

Marker Crags map | Google maps | Topo maps

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Clyde River
Grade 1
A straightforward climb.
Alpine - 13 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

The head of the Frances River gives access to peaks on the Main Divide and to Perth Col, and from there to the Gardens of Eden and Allah

Access: The head of the Frances River gives access to peaks on the Main Divide and to Perth Col, and from there to the Gardens of Eden and Allah. The valley has long been used to reach the Gardens and for crossings to the West Coast. In the 1880s John Acland named the good camping area at the entrance to the valley Bay Of Plenty. In the 1930s Lloyd Wilson named Windy Corner, on the true right near the crossing point to McCoy Hut, and he also named The Sewer, found about 1 km upriver where the river used to cut into bluffs necessitating a swim or steep scramble. Travel along the Frances River is easiest on the true right. A vague track from McCoy Hut cuts north-west to join the river upstream of a short section where the river flows over bedrock. Follow the river here for a couple of hundred metres to a gravel flat. Cross here if possible and continue to towards Tauroa Creek, taking a couple of short minor scrub sidles behind boulders about 600 metres past Tauroa Creek. Beyond Agnes Stream stay close to the river to pass a moraine boulder field, and continue to silt flats and the lake at the foot of the Colin Campbell Glacier. Travel along gravel from here to the Frances Glacier. Tent sites exist a few hundred metres downstream of Tauroa Creek, in the vicinity of Agnes Stream and just below the confluence with the Colin Campbell Glacier.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

P191 1

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Perth Col
Grade 1
A bump on the Divide that generally presents no problems once the Main Divide is reached.
Quoin%20pk

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

MD
Main Divide Ridges
Grade 1
A bump on the Divide, which generally presents no problems when climbed from Perth Col.

This saddle straddles the Cloudy Peak Range near its junction with the Main Divide at Outram Peak and is the standard route between the heads of the Clyde and Havelock Rivers.

Access: From the Havelock River, climb straightforward tussock and snow slopes, avoiding a few crevasses, to Disappointment Saddle. From the saddle head south, sidling on snowfields, and once below the icecliffs descend the true right of Agnes Stream on rock and moraine debris. Disappointment Saddle links with Perth Col and the Garden of Eden by a snow shelf east of Outram Peak – see the East Ridge of Outram Peak

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

P191 0

Southern Alps Ka Tiritiri O Te Moana

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Ridge
Grade 1.25
From Havelock Col climb good rock slabs and minor snow along the ridge to the summit.
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From Disappointment Saddle
Grade 2
Follow Agnes Stream to Disappointment Saddle and climb the snow slope, which merges with a steep snow arête leading to the final rock ridge.
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East Ridge
Grade 2
A schrund extending from bluffs under the east ridge of Outram Peak across to an icefall just south of Schrund Peak can completely cut off the col between Outram and Schrund peaks, but may be negotiable early in a heavy snow season. Instead, from Disappointment Saddle sidle across snow slopes to the col south-west of Quoin Peak and traverse the glacier on the northern side of Schrund Peak, then follow the rock ridge to the top. An alternative involves climbing the broad, crevassed southern aspects of Schrund Peak and dropping down to the col, and reaching the East Ridge from there. In good conditions this route offers a good transalpine crossing from the Havelock to the Garden of Eden.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75
Trireme

Trireme has three peaks and was named for its resemblance to the Greek style of warship. The western peak was the first to be climbed, from the Agnes Glacier, and a traverse of all three peaks involves some time-consuming ridge climbing.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Peak, South East Ridge
Grade 0
Traverse the summit ridge from the Middle Peak.
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Middle Peak, South West Ridge
Grade 2
From the Havelock riverbed, reach Orb Col east of Veil Peak and follow the western slopes of Helmet Peak. Finally, follow the north-west side of the South West Ridge on generally good rock to the southern summit of Trireme. Richard Studholme, Tom Morton, Peter Bain (during a traverse of all three peaks), December 1966 Alternatively, head up Veil Stream and follow the Clover Glacier to the prominent col between the middle peak and Helmet Peak. An easier route may be to climb direct to Orb Col from the junction of Veil Stream and the Havelock River. From the col, sidle Helmet Peak on the north and, depending on the conditions, choose a route from the small glacier west of Trireme or follow the South West Ridge.
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East Peak, West Ridge
Grade 0
Traverse the summit ridge from the Middle Peak.
NB
North Buttress, East Peak
Grade 2
From the upper Agnes Glacier, cross south onto snowfields at the head of Emily Creek. Head due south up reasonably straightforward rock towards the summit.
AG
West Peak, From Agnes Glacier
Grade 0

Turoa

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Veil Stream
Grade 1
Head up Veil Stream. Climb the ridge between Rollover and Clover Glaciers, then follow Rollover Glacier and make a steep ridge scramble to the summit.
FR
From Frances River
Grade 0
Follow Tauroa Creek for about 1 km then climb a scree slope that leads to the long north-east ridge of Tauroa. From here options exist via the south-east ridge, east face and north-east ridge.

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Access: This provides a crossing from the Frances River to the head of the Rakaia River. Travel up the Frances Glacier to the col is straightforward. From Rangitata Col drop down 110 metres or so and head southeast, traversing below Mt Nicholson to McCoy Col.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade 0
A straightforward ascent from Rangitata Col.
Alpine - 37 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

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Access: From McCoy Hut, head along the true right of McCoy Stream. After about 4 km cross to the true left if possible to avoid a tedious and steep high sidle above bluffs, then continue up to the rocky upper reaches.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Access: The col is reached via a straightforward ascent from the upper McCoy Stream. To reach the Rakaia River, climb around Pt 2091 metres to reach the couloir immediately south of the point, and then follow this couloir down to Kirk Stream. From here, do not descend Kirk Stream ; instead, climb to a small saddle south of Prelude Peak, head east, and follow the spur that leads down from Pt 1753 metres to reach the upper Rakaia River at the east end of Lyell Lake.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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West Ridge
Grade 1.75
Follow the Lyell Glacier moraine to a prominent gully leading to View Peak. Follow the gully until above the steep lower slopes, then traverse towards Goethe. Climb steep rock and snow to join the West Ridge – easiest west of Pt 2246 metres – then follow the straightforward rocky ridge to the summit. This ridge has been traversed from McCoy Col with much scrambling and rock climbing.
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South East Ridge
Grade 2.25
From Kirk Stream climb the loose rock face to the ridge and follow it to the summit. The South East Ridge can be reached via Gladiator Col. Alternatively, follow a steep easttrending glacial lead from the glacier on the south face of Goethe, which joins the South East Ridge about 150 metres below the summit.
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North East Ridge
Grade 0
Climb the spur at the junction of Kirk Stream and the Lyell Glacier. Access to the spur is the crux of the route.

Usually climbed as part of a traverse to Bardolph Peak from Gladiator Col.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 2
From the head of McCoy Stream follow good rock to the top.
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South Ridge
Grade 1.75
The short South Ridge was completed as part of a traverse from Nym to Pistol peaks via Bardolph.
Bardolph

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NE-SW
North East and South West Ridges
Grade 0
A short climb on good rock. Originally climbed as part of a traverse from Pistol Peak.
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Traverse
Grade 1.25
From Gladiator Col, climb along the ridge, traversing Pistol, then up good solid slabs on the western side of Bardolph to the top.

na

Access: Reaching Toledo Col involves a straightforward ascent up rock and glacier. The col leads to the upper Hector Glacier, which is now the best access to the West Ridge and northern aspects of The Warrior.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Nym

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NW
North West Ridge
Grade 1.75
A short climb from Toledo Col.
Spearpoint

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SE
South East Ridge
Grade 0
A straightforward climb from Toledo Col.
SF
Shanks Face
Grade 0
From the head of McCoy Stream, gain the snow basin north-east of Spearpoint Peak. Head directly up, mostly scrambling but a rope may be necessary.
Scimitar

na

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SW
South West Ridge
Grade 1
An easy climb from a camp at the junction of the McCoy and Billy McCoy Streams. Follow scree and snow slopes to the top.
Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75

na

Access: Follow the McCoy Glacier directly up to the col. From the col head straight down an initial steep slope towards a snow basin, before traversing east under rock into a broad gully. Descend north-east on rock and snow to about 1540 metres, alongside the Lyell Glacier. From here follow the south side of the glacier to Lyell Lake. Rangitata Col can also be reached from McCoy Col : From the col traverse a crevassed ice shelf below the East Ridge of Mt Nicholson and follow the broad glacier to Rangitata Col.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Rangitata Col
Grade 1.25
Follow generally straightforward snow slopes. The final few metres are on steep loose rock.
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East Ridge
Grade 2
From McCoy Col follow very loose rock along the East Ridge to the top. Reached from the upper Rakaia Valley on the first ascent.
-
East Face
Grade 0
Best attempted early in the season when covered in snow. Descend via the East Ridge to McCoy Col.
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North West Face
Grade 1.25
This face is commonly approached from the Rakaia River and Rangitata Col. From Rangitata Col, head up the broad glacier to the summit.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
From McCoy Col scramble along the rocky North West Ridge to the top.
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South West Ridge
Grade 1.75
Gain the South West Ridge from the upper McCoy Glacier and follow snow and rock to the summit
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North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
Follow the ridge from McCoy Col.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

-
Original Route
Grade 1
First climbed by Edgar Williams from the Rakaia River in 1917. It is a steep slog from the upper McCoy Stream
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From Lyell Glacier
Grade 0
From the Lyell Glacier follow a small side creek draining View Peak, then continue on easyangled slopes to the top.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

-
From McCoy Stream
Grade 1.25
Follow a snow lead that leads to the ridge between View Peak and Pt 2246 metres. Traverse east and follow the glacier to the summit.
Alpine - 16 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75 3+

na

Access: The lower reaches are steeply gorged and a simple high-level traverse of the gorge is difficult. The gorge is passable in low water, with numerous crossings and a scramble around the final waterfall. It is impassable in high water. The Hector Glacier is now usually cut off above its confluence with Hecuba Glacier, but in good conditions Hecuba Glacier is still a feasible route to Battleaxe Col.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 12 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+

Battleaxe Col provides a crossing from McCoy Stream to the Rakaia River and is a useful access point to the southern aspects of The Warrior from Sinclair Stream.

Access: The lower reaches of Billy McCoy Stream are steeply gorged but may be passable in low water or with a high sidle (see above), and in good conditions Hecuba Glacier is a feasible route to Battleaxe Col, but it can get cut off in its lower reaches. In summer the final climb to the col is up steep rock. From Battleaxe Col, Crossbow Saddle is reached by heading south-east across straightforward snow and ice slopes. To reach the Rakaia River follow the steep Kirk Glacier and follow Kirk Stream as far as a small side creek draining the south side of Prelude Peak. Climb to a small saddle south of Prelude Peak, head east, and follow the spur that leads down from Pt 1753 metres reaching the Rakaia River at the east end of Lyell Lake.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
The%20warrior1 file0014

Armoury Range

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NR
North Ridge
Grade 2.25
From Toledo Col, skirt under Nym Peak then head up to the ridge, which offers a steep climb on good red rock that was mostly belayed on the first ascent. The lower part of the ridge is broad enough to offer a selection of routes. Higher up, a short section of snow leads to the summit.
NW
North West Couloir
Grade 1.75
Reach the Hector Glacier either via McCoy Stream and Toledo Col (easier) or via Billy McCoy Stream (much more difficult). From the head of the glacier two prominent gullies cut the north face. Take the gully on the right, ascending snow but climbing through a small rocky notch if snow cover is low, then follow loose rock to the summit ridge. Follow the broad, loose upper West Ridge over the low peak to the summit, turning a small block on the east side.
WR
West Ridge
Grade 2.75
The original route followed Billy McCoy Stream to the Hector Glacier and reached the West Ridge above the Hector icefall. The upper Hector Glacier is now typically cut off at the icefall and access to the ridge is best by way of the upper McCoy Stream and Toledo Col. Once at the ridge, traverse two triangular faces before continuing up the ridge on good rock. The ridge narrows and is exposed in places. The rock on the northern side of the ridge is good and the ridge broadens before the low peak.
SW
South West Face
Grade 2
From the bottom of the upper Hecuba Glacier, follow steep snow and ice slopes up and left, over a schrund, then climb above the icecliffs and follow a prominent rib leading almost directly to the summit.
SR
South Ridge
Grade 1.25
The South Ridge is gained from the vicinity of Battleaxe Col or as part of a traverse from Amazon Peak. If approaching via Billy McCoy Stream and the Hecuba Glacier, access may be difficult or impossible. From the head of the Hecuba Glacier, take a couloir that gains the South Ridge on the Amazon side of Battleaxe Col. The ridge involves some good red rock but also badly broken greywacke and argillite, including a section of difficult rock over the buttress that trends down to the Kirk Glacier. From here, move on to snow on the Kirk side to avoid gendarmes, before regaining the ridge to the summit.
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Central Couloir
Grade 1.75
From the upper reaches of the Kirk Glacier follow a broad snow slope into a narrow couloir slightly west of the summit, which leads directly to the top.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
From the head of the Kirk Glacier climb steep ice leading north on the right (may be cut off late season) for about 400 vertical metres. Then follow a steep couloir to a prominent shoulder on the East Ridge. Continue up the rocky East Ridge to join the summit ridge a short distance south of the summit.
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I've Got Soul But I'm Not A Soldier
Grade 3.25
600m 7 pitches, with some simul-climbing.
Amazon

n/a

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NR
North Ridge
Grade 1
Climb the straightforward glacier from Battleaxe Col, then the final few metres of rocky ridge to the summit.
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South West Ridge
Grade 1.75
A short distance upstream of Sinclair Bivvy, follow a moraine crest to the line of bluffs running parallel to the valley below Bandit Peak. Move diagonally through the bluffs on snow slopes to reach the crest of the South West Ridge. Follow easy rock along the ridge to the summit. An alternative route on to the ridge exists at the northern end of the bluffs and crosses the glacier between Pt 2300 metres and Amazon Peak.
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From Crossbow Saddle
Grade 1
From the upper Sinclair River, follow a snow gully to Crossbow Saddle and then up the straightforward glacier to the final few metres of rock below the summit.
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From Kirk Stream
Grade 1
A straightforward snow climb from the upper Kirk Glacier with a final short rocky scramble to the top.

The Sentinel was first climbed from the Clyde River by Allan Cookson and Jack Pattle in November 1946. There are many options to the top, the most common being the North West Ridge.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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North West Ridge
Grade 1.25
Head up the side creek draining the glacier on the south side of The Sentinel. After about 1 km, follow a broad scree slope north-east to join the end of the North West Ridge, and follow this to the summit.
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From Sinclair River
Grade 0
The third ascent of The Sentinel was part of a traverse from the Sinclair River to McCoy Stream.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 1.25
Follow the creek draining the basin south of Bandit Peak, climbing through bluffs on the true left of the waterfall. Then cross scree to an easy ridge, loose in places, to reach the summit.
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North East Ridge
Grade 0
A short distance upstream of Sinclair Bivvy, follow a moraine crest to the line of bluffs running parallel to the valley below Bandit Peak. Move diagonally through on snow slopes to reach the crest of the North East Ridge and follow to the summit.

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Access: The Sinclair River provides straightforward travel. There is a rock bivvy on the true left, slightly downstream of the creek draining the basin south of Mt Johnstone (J35 347567 / BW18 247 951), and good camping at the head of the river.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Crossbow Saddle provides a crossing to the Rakaia River and also to Battleaxe Col and routes on The Warrior.

Access: Climb straightforward rock and snow to the saddle. Battleaxe Col is reached by heading north-west across snow and ice slopes. To reach the Rakaia River, follow Kirk Stream as far as a small side creek draining the south side of Prelude Peak. Do not continue down Kirk Stream ; instead, climb to a small saddle south of Prelude Peak, head east, and follow the spur which leads down from Pt 1753 metres, reaching the Rakaia River at the east end of Lyell Lake.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South Couloir
Grade 1.75
The South Couloir was the route of the first ascent of Mt Renegade, originally reached from the Sinclair River and Crossbow Saddle – this is still the most popular way to reach the summit. From the saddle, sidle to reach the glacier between Outlaw Peak and Mt Renegade, and from here take the couloir just west of the south ridge which leads to the rocky summit slopes.
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South Ridge / Lawrence Face
Grade 1
From Crossbow Saddle traverse the glacier under Outlaw on the Kirk side, then climb easy rock.
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North Ridge
Grade 1
A straightforward ridge, reached from the unnamed stream east of Prelude Peak.
Alpine - 82 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 16 0 - 16

na

Access: The Lawrence River is a major tributary of the Clyde River and drains the Jollie and Arrowsmith Ranges. It provides access to the highest peaks of the Arrowsmith Range from Mt Gould to Pito Peak, including Red, North, Jagged, Upham, and Couloir. It also allows access to the easiest route on Mt Arrowsmith itself which, at over 2700m, is the highest peak in the range. The head of the Lawrence River is dramatic, confined and ringed by steep mountains, but it is rarely visited despite being the site of some of the harder routes in the range. Loose rock is ubiquitous on peaks of the Arrowsmith Range and all gullies and faces are subject to frequent debris fall. Huts Erewhon Station Hut (originally called McRaes Hut, private) Lawrence Hut (DOC) : A six-bunk hut in good condition. Hermitage Hut (Erewhon Station) private. Lawrence Bivouac (DOC) : A basic two-person tin bivvy. Lawrence River access The Lawrence River is reached from Erewhon Station. Permission to cross station land should be obtained from Colin and Christine Drummond (phone 03 303 9739) and details left in the intentions book at the homestead. Access by 4WD is possible to Hermitage Hut and vehicles can often be taken as far as Outlaw Stream. The 4WD track heads across farmland to the Clyde riverbed. The track is regularly washed out in the Clyde River area : ask at the homestead for the latest conditions. Once at the entrance to the Lawrence Valley, the track can be picked up either on the terrace by Erewhon Station Hut or in the riverbed itself and remains on the true right of the valley as far as Bush Basin. There is a turn-off to Lawrence Hut, along which vehicles should backtrack to rejoin the Lawrence River. The track is indistinct in places but crosses to the true left, where it is well-defined on the terrace by Hermitage Hut. The route continues as far as Moses Creek but is rough in places. When travelling on foot, the Lawrence tributary and/or braids of the Clyde River should be crossed shortly after reaching the riverbed, to avoid a section of steep riverbank abutting the river. If the river is not crossable here make a tedious sidle above the river, in and out of gullies on the true left, taking care not to drop down to the river too soon. Continue into the Lawrence Valley and, in low water, follow the riverbed, crossing to the true left where the river is confined by old moraine. Travel is generally fine with no fords until past the junction with the stream draining Butler Saddle.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 3 0 - 2.75 3+
Jagged 0Jagged1

Arrowsmith Range

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

LB
Lawrence Buttress
Grade 4
Start up a steep chimney a short distance along the northern side of the buttress and stay close to the crest of the buttress for the rest of the way. Where steep, the rock is clean, solid and timeconsuming. This leads to the North Ridge, which is followed to the summit.
JU
Jagged-Upham Couloir
Grade 5
The obvious natural top to bottom line – a typical ice route, usually best in late winter. The climbing is straightforward in the lower sections with three distinct steps but steepens higher up, with little protection, and contains a rock step just below the Jagged-Upham Col. The route is subject to debris fall. From five to eight pitches may be needed, depending on conditions. This route is time-consuming and saw several attempts before it was successfully climbed.
WL
Whiplash
Grade 6
Start up the Jagged-Upham couloir, climbing a short steep step below where the Whiplash Gully turns off to the right. Climb ice here or, if ice is thin, stay in the main Jagged-Upham couloir and take a steep, mixed ramp to Whiplash Gully. Continue up steep ice, which merges with a five-metre frozen waterfall. The upper couloir contains 60-degree ice with one short steeper section. After the steeper section aim for the top of Deep Throat Gully and the summit block of Jagged. The route can be time-consuming and the Grade is dependent on conditions.
EF
East Face
Grade 0
A buttress of sound rock interspersed with loose argillite.
DT
Deep Throat
Grade 5.25
The first obvious gully north of the East Buttress averages 70-degree ice, but the sixth pitch has a 30-metre vertical ice step before the angle eases and the central icefields are reached. The Throat is the top section of the next gully to the north, a deeply gutted fissure in the upper face with an intimidating headwall. The first ascent went up rock on the left (south) side of the Throat. It is possible to cross the Throat at its entrance and continue up the right face over steep, broken ground. The route meets a col just below the summit, to the north of Jagged Peak. Sustained.
G2
Gully Two / Cargo Couloir
Grade 5.25
Follow a deeply-incised gully just to the right of Deep Throat. Climb steep ice and two 15-metre ice walls, several smaller ones and a very difficult 45-metre mixed pitch. Exit up Deep Throat.
G3
Gully Three
Grade 0
Follow the last major gully before a prominent buttress dropping down to the Cameron Glacier. Climb several steep steps and frozen waterfalls. The final two or three rope lengths to the summit ridge involve unpleasant rock.
G4
Gully Four
Grade 0
The next gully to the right.
ER
East Ridge
Grade 2.75
From Jagged Col the ridge is steep but straightforward on the Jagged Stream side to about half height. From here gain the crest of the ridge and traverse three small gendarmes, separated by narrow ridges of loose rock, to the summit. The third gendarme is the crux.
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North East Face
Grade 2.25
A couloir on the North East Face leads from the Jagged Glacier to loose rock just below the summit. Often used as a quick descent route.
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North Ridge
Grade 2.25
Possibly the easiest route to the summit. Head up Jagged Glacier (can be cut off late season) to gain the Lawrence divide at the foot of the North Ridge. Drop below the ridge on the Lawrence side until reaching a wedge-shaped gap, then climb easy couloirs on the Rakaia side back onto the ridge for the final few gaps and pinnacles to the summit.
Alpine - 11 routes - avg. grade 3 0 - 2.75 3+
Sports - 1 route - avg. grade 16 0 - 16
Arrowsmith 0Arrowsmith1Arrowsmith2 1

Mt Arrowsmith was first climbed by Hugh Wright and Jim Murphy in February 1912. They climbed from the Lawrence Valley but, initially mistaking Couloir Peak for Mt Arrowsmith, they ended up a considerable distance north of their goal. They managed to climb Mt Arrowsmith after traversing from near Couloir Peak and climbing the North Ridge to the summit.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

LV
From Lawrence Valley
Grade 2
This is perhaps the least technical route on Mt Arrowsmith. Most parties reach the head of Moses Creek via Moses Rock, a domed bluff sitting on the true left of the creek. Moses Rock can be reached from the Lawrence Valley via various routes, but most commonly by following a scree gully immediately south of a patch of scrub about 1250 metres south of the creek draining the south side of Moses Rock. Aim for Pt 1646 metres, then traverse north to the flat plateau above Moses Rock. From here, climb the glacier at the head of Moses Creek. The upper section of glacier can be reached by either a steep snow ramp (a rock step with rock fall late in the season) or by climbing to a small col on the ridge south-east of Pt 2319 metres. Once at the col, drop northwards over the ridge to sidle around the steep, lower part of the ridge, then head eastwards onto the crest of the rock ridge and from here gain the upper glacier. The upper glacier provides access to various gullies and loose rock ribs which lead to the North and South ridges of Arrowsmith. Follow the ridge (exposed in places) for the final few metres to the summit.
SWR
South West Ridge
Grade 2
The South West Ridge can be traversed from Ashburton Peak to the summit, turning two gendarmes on the Lawrence side. Alternatively, the ridge can be reached directly from the Hakatere River via snow slopes and small glaciers.
AF
Ashburton Face
Grade 3.25
This is a snow and ice climb up a broad snow face followed by one of a number of gullies to the summit of Mt Arrowsmith. From the moraines at the head of the Hakatere River climb to the schrund at the bottom of the Ashburton Face. Climb a short, steep section alongside a steep rock rib to gain the slope above. Climb until a small arête is reached, and from here either go left to snow slopes and gullies that join the South West Ridge, or head up steeper rock directly to the summit. Usually in condition only from late winter to early summer, and subject to rock fall.
ER
East Ridge
Grade 3.25
A long route when attempted via East Horn, the first half of which is on poor rock. Alternatively, reach the ridge via the South Cameron Glacier, climbing steep snow slopes to a col of rotten rock on the East Ridge. A schrund 60–70 metres below the col may be passed on rock on the left. Climb along the narrow ridge crest to reach the big outlier to the east of Mt Arrowsmith. Climb the outlier on a wall of good rock, then scramble down and along the ridge on loose rock to a rotten, narrow col. From here a steep section of friable rock leads to solid slabs and cracks and then up three rock steps to the summit.
MLS
Methven LandSAR
Grade 4
250m
CB
Cameron Buttress
Grade 3.75
This route follows a series of good rock slabs, with two pitches up to grade 14, on the prominent rock rib rising out of the South Cameron Glacier. Climb the second buttress, avoiding the toe of the ridge, and top out on the main outlying peak on the East Ridge. This route provides good access to the best (final) part of the East Ridge.
CS
Cameron Spur
Grade 4
Follow the spur for approximately 6 pitches until you meet up with the original Cameron Buttress Route.
CC
Central Couloir
Grade 2.75
This is a direct route from the South Cameron Glacier that follows the main couloir to the summit. It was the original descent route but is now the most common route to the summit. In good snow conditions the climb is straightforward, but if snow is thin at least two major rock steps may need to be negotiated, usually on the broad ledges and short walls to the right of the couloir, and this will increase the grade of the climb. Once on the summit ridge scramble around on the Lawrence side to the summit. The couloir is prone to bombardment from rock and ice debris and usually is not a late season route. A second couloir, 200 metres further north along the ridge, is also useable.
NR
North Ridge
Grade 2, 0
1. From the South Cameron Glacier follow moderate slopes, which lead to at least two snow gullies that provide access to the North Ridge. Scramble along the pinnacled ridge turning the last gendarmes on easy ledges on the Lawrence side.
2. The full North Ridge can be reached from Cameron Col and involves a long day’s scrambling, exposed in places. Initially good progress can be made on the Lawrence side, but once forced onto the ridge the numerous towers are time consuming.
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The Outlier
Grade 0
350m
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Three Steps to Methven
Grade 0

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Methven Dread
Grade 16
190m

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lawrence Glacier
Grade 1.25
Follow the north branch of the Lawrence Glacier until it steepens below Lawrence Col. Here, gain access to the upper glacier that drains the north-western slopes of Lawrence Peak. A straightforward climb.
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East Ridge
Grade 1.25
Follow easy slopes to reach the snowy East Ridge north of Jagged Glacier. This ridge narrows and leads to steep rock, which is followed directly to the summit.
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North Ridge
Grade 1.75
Take the southernmost Gridiron Glacier. When below the rock buttress on the upper névé, traverse northwards around the head of a snow couloir that provides access to the northern Gridiron Glacier. From here, head up to the Lawrence divide and follow snow slopes with some easy rock scrambling on the Lawrence side of the ridge to the unimposing summit.
UphamUpham2

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

LB
Lawrence Buttress
Grade 5
This is the route of the first direct ascent of Upham ; all previous climbs had been part of a traverse. Follow the buttress heading almost directly to the summit from the head of the Lawrence Glacier. The route is straightforward with one pitch up to grade 5, but the rock is poor.
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From Tower Peak
Grade 3
From Tower Peak traverse a needle and three major towers, turning the first on the Cameron face and crossing the tops of the remaining two to the final pitch. Loose and tricky in places.
UB
Upham Buttress
Grade 5
Reach the buttress via the obvious, debris-exposed ramp and follow it for 11 steep and demanding pitches negotiating a big crack, a mini-ramp, a large wide chimney and more cracks, up to rock grade 15. The rock is mainly good.
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From Jagged Peak
Grade 2.75
From the ridge just south of the summit of Jagged Peak, make an exposed traverse down and along a narrow ledge on the Cameron side to the col between Jagged and Upham. From here it is a steep scramble to the top of Upham.
TowerTower1

The high point is the needle-like tower in a group of four pinnacles and some inventive climbing may be required to reach the summit.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

NWC
North West Couloir and Buttress
Grade 3
Take the prominent couloir that leads up from the head of the Lawrence Glacier. If out of condition, climb the buttress on the right – on a thin band of solid rock with plenty of small holds. Head out of the couloir onto the exposed rock of a prominent rib, which leads up the face to the summit ridge. Climb a short distance along the ridge to the summit pinnacles.
WC
West Couloir
Grade 2.75
From the basin immediately south of the bend in the Lawrence Glacier, follow the small glacier that leads to the east-trending couloir that runs towards the summit of Tower Peak. Climb the couloir to a notch in a prominent rib. From here, traverse along and slightly down the ridge before heading up diagonally across the face on ribs of sound rock interspersed with friable sections. Gain the summit ridge and climb straightforward rock to the summit pinnacles.
HO
Harrow-Osborne
Grade 3
Above the second icefall of the Cameron Glacier, gain a snow and ice lead below Pt 2642 metres. Traverse steep, exposed rock to reach the small glacier south of Tower Peak. Follow snow to the crest of the ridge and scramble to the summit, passing most obstacles on the Lawrence side.
EF
East Face
Grade 3.25
From Upham Buttress, scramble up an indistinct rock rib right of the hanging glacier south of Tower Peak. The climbing is not difficult but the rock is loose.
Alpine - 7 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
Twins

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Couloir Route
Grade 2.75
Climb the moraine wall and follow scree and snow to the high Twins–Couloir basin. From this basin climb the couloir that meets the summit ridge just north of The Twins summit. One short, steep pitch is encountered in the upper reaches.
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West Ridge
Grade 1.75
The ridge can be gained from The Twins–Couloir basin (see above) and involves a scramble to the top.
-
From Lawrence Valley
Grade 0
No details known.
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South West Ridge (South Twin)
Grade 0

SR
South Ridge
Grade 3
From the Cameron Glacier, aim for snow slopes leading to the South Ridge. Travel up the ridge is initially straightforward, passing several pinnacles. Climb two rock steps (approximately 10 and 15 metres high) : the first takes a corner followed by a small rotten wall, and the second follows a small gully. From here reasonable rock leads to the summit.
EF
East Face
Grade 3
From the Cameron Glacier climb a narrow snow lead directly below The Twins. Climb through a rock band to join the final section of the South Ridge or take the direct finish by climbing loose rock to join the summit ridge between the two peaks.
RH
Right-hand Route
Grade 0
Take the gully from the Cameron Glacier that meets the Twins–Tower ridge just north of the north Twin. Cross a schrund at the head of the slope and continue on snow and rock to the col and summit ridge. There is one steep ice pitch near the top.
Coulior

After Hugh Wright and Jim Murphy abandoned their attempt in 1912, to make the first ascent of Mt Arrowsmith, Couloir wasn’t climbed until 1934. There are several options from Lawrence River. The Couloir is the classic route to the summit of Couloir Peak, pioneered by the redoubtable Stan Conway and Tom Newth and the scene of their legendary 2500-foot fall during a storm on the descent. After their successful climb, an avalanche knocked Tom off his feet, he collided with Stan and they tumbled down the couloir in a long series of arcs, alternately airborne, then pounding into the ice as the rope between them became taught and reined in their flight. Eventually the rope coiled around Tom and the arcing stopped. One last flight saw them clear rocks at the bottom of the couloir before hitting the névé and rolling to a stop millimetres from the edge of a crevasse. Both were injured, with Stan having to be evacuated by horse. Despite this, Tom was able to show up for work the next day and the incident was glossed over – although it was more than 20 years before the route was repeated.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lawrence Valley
Grade 2, 0, 0
1. Follow the top of the moraine wall above the Lawrence Glacier and from here climb a solid rock ridge to the crest. Traverse south, climbing into a gap with a steep bluff on the north side, then continue to the summit
2. From a shingle slope, follow the creek draining the north side of Mt Arrowsmith and climb to the upper basin. From here traverse Pt 2474 metres and reach the crest of the range slightly north of Cameron Col.
3. Start up the glacier where the moraine wall has been breached, then follow scree and snow to the high Twins–Couloir basin. Climb a steep wall of rock to reach the final ridge and summit.
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South Gullies
Grade 2.25
Take one of the two prominent gullies left of the main couloir which lead to a small plateau on the Lawrence divide. From here, follow reasonably angled rock for the last 200 metres to the summit, or follow a snow-filled gully left of the rock.
SR
South Ridge
Grade 0
Climb the ridge south of the peak, which leads directly to the summit, starting either on rock or up an ice gully.
TG
The Couloir
Grade 3
Follow the Cameron Glacier to the base of the prominent snow couloir cutting the south-east face of the peak. The lower section contains the crux, a steep, two-metre ice wall, after which the route lays back to about 45 degrees and ends about 30 metres from the summit ridge. From here, cross left under the buttress into a short, steep, icy gully then follow good ice for the last 10 metres to the summit ridge.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lawrence Valley
Grade 1.25
About 2 km north of Hermitage Hut follow a north-east trending spur before traversing into a basin between Ashburton and Hakatere Peaks. From here the summits are straightforward climbs.
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South West Ridge
Grade 1.25
A grassy trough beside the lateral moraine at the foot of the Ashburton Glacier leads to scree slopes interspersed with rock bluffs. Climb these to the upper basin lying between Ashburton and Hakatere Peaks. From here reach the crest of the range and follow rock to the top.
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North East Ridge
Grade 1.25
Head up snow slopes and a steep gully to join the North East Ridge a short distance from the top.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lawrence Valley
Grade 1.25
About 2 km north of Hermitage Hut follow a north-east trending spur before traversing into a basin between Ashburton and Hakatere Peaks. From here the summits are straightforward climbs.
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From Hakatere Valley
Grade 1.25
A grassy trough beside the lateral moraine at the foot of the Ashburton Glacier leads to scree slopes interspersed with rock bluffs. Climb these to the upper basin lying between Ashburton and Hakatere Peaks. The summit is separated from the basin by 100 metres of steepish rock and can be approached by either a diagonal gully descending from the Ashburton–Hakatere ridge or by way of the south ridge and easy ledges on the south-east face.
Alpine - 6 routes - avg. grade 1 0 - 2.75
South%20pk

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

WF
West Face
Grade 0
The steep West Face is relatively easy to reach but only one route exists, a scramble on good rock.
SR
South Ridge, via Lawrence
Grade 1.25
Climb the spur on the northern side of the creek that joins the Lawrence River immediately north of Hermitage Hut. Gain the high col overlooking the South Ashburton Valley and follow the rock ridge northwards. The first narrow arête can be traversed or turned on a series of ledges to the west, and broken blocks lead to a final short traverse to the summit over an exposed, narrow ridge of very loose argillite – many parties stop at this point.
SR
South Ridge, via Hakatere
Grade 1.25
Best attempted from the hanging valley that joins the main valley a short distance up the lateral moraine. Move up over glaciated slopes to gain the ridge overlooking the Lawrence, slightly south of the summit. Broken blocks lead to a final short traverse to the summit over an exposed, narrow ridge of very loose argillite – many parties stop at this point.
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North East Face
Grade 1.25
Follow the top of the lateral moraine above the Ashburton Glacier to the basin between South and Hakatere Peaks. Follow a snow slope and very rotten rock to the summit.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
Sidle into the basin below South Peak and head to a gut between the summit and the first gendarme to the south. After climbing the gut, follow the last section of very rotten ridge to the top.
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North Ridge
Grade 0

1 pb130176

The first recorded climb of Pito Peak was by Doug Gordon, William Vaughan, A W White and Arthur Dixon in December 1945, but it is highly likely that the peak saw far earlier ascents, possibly by local shepherds and runholders.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lawrence Valley
Grade 1
Climb the spur on the northern side of the creek that joins the Lawrence River upstream of Hermitage Hut. Gain the high col overlooking the South Ashburton Valley and follow an easy ridge southward to the summit. Alternatively, the north branch of the creek above Hermitage Hut presents difficult travel and the south branch provides good going.
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North Ridge
Grade 1
Best attempted from the hanging valley that joins the main valley a short distance up the lateral moraine. From the col at the head, the first of the three summits is reached via a short walk up an easy ridge.
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East Face
Grade 1
From Hakatere flats, climb long leading spur north of a stream draining the east flank, through bluff and into tarn basin below face. Climb open face to summit ridge and then right to the high point.

Jollie Range

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South Ridge
Grade 1.25
To reach the South Ridge, begin a rising traverse 1 km down valley from Sinclair Bivvy. Follow cones of scree then rock gullies and grassy slopes. When nearing the basin below the low peak, cross the stream and gain the lower portion of the western ridge leading to the low peak south of Mt Johnstone. Traverse gendarmes and detour onto firm red rock slabs before reaching the low peak. A short easy traverse leads to the high summit.
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South Ridge from Lawrence
Grade 2
The glacier south of Mt Johnstone can be reached either via the side creek north of Lawrence Hut or from the creek south of Outlaw Stream. Follow the glacier to a col at the foot of the South Ridge of the low peak (2238m). The ridge is time consuming until the low peak is reached, but is straightforward from there to the high peak.

Pt 2246 metres has been known informally as Urquhart for many years and is usually referred to as such in the older literature.

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South West Ridge
Grade 0
The South West Ridge can be reached via a slog up from the Sinclair River and involves a rocky scramble to the summit.
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North Ridge
Grade 1.25
Follow the side creek north of Lawrence Hut, crossing into the basin south of Mt Johnstone at its head. To gain the North Ridge, climb a gully then follow a rock rib to the summit. Traversing the ridge between Urquhart and Jollie involves many guts and gendarmes.

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Access: Bandolero Col provides access to the South East Ridge of Outlaw Peak by a simple glacier climb at the head of the Sinclair River, and also to Outlaw Glacier from where the North Ridge of Outlaw and the South Ridge of Renegade are reached. However, the ridge south of Musterers Col provides the preferred crossing to the Lawrence River.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

Jollie Range

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South East Ridge
Grade 2
A straightforward ascent of the Sinclair Glacier leads to Bandolero Col. From here, follow a broken 20-metre couloir, followed by a traverse around the northern side of a spire. If snow conditions are favourable, difficulties low down can be passed on the northern side of the ridge. Near the top of the ridge a short crack topped by a big chockstone can be tackled directly and leads to a couloir. The summit is a short distance further on.
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North Ridge
Grade 0
From Bandolero Col climb the Outlaw Glacier to the rocky ridge that leads to the summit.
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West Ridge
Grade 1.75
The West Ridge is usually reached from Crossbow Saddle or the Kirk Glacier and provides a long mix of snow and rock to the summit.

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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From Lawrence River
Grade 0
Reportedly an uncomplicated climb from the side creek north of Lawrence Hut.

Ambrose Saddle is seldom used for crossing between the Lawrence and Rakaia Rivers.

Access: Ambrose Saddle can be reached via a long traverse from the unnamed stream east of Prelude Peak. From the saddle move west until a route can be found down the small glacier below the col, then traverse to the south ridge of Pt 1883 metres and follow this to the Lawrence Valley floor, making sure to avoid Hells Gates. Alternatively, from the saddle traverse Pt 2106 metres to join the south ridge of Pt 1883 metres.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

These peaks are rarely climbed from the Rakaia, but can be reached from basins to their west via the unnamed stream east of Prelude Peak.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Divide Ridges
Grade 1
The Jollie Sisters comprise four minor, closely-spaced peaks, individually named from east to west Jane, Jean, Joan and June. They are a straightforward climb along the ridge.

Mt Gould can be used for a long descent of Red Peak when parties are reluctant to downclimb steep loose rock.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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South West Ridge
Grade 2
From the Lawrence River climb above the moraine and follow the broad buttress leading to the small glacier on the south side of Mt Gould. Climb the glacier to the South West Ridge and follow this to the top.
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East Ridge
Grade 0
From the Reischek Glacier head around the névé under the peak and follow snow to a col east of the peak. From here follow the ridge to the summit.
Alpine - 5 routes - avg. grade 0 0 - 2.75 3+
RedRedpk1

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Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

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Lawrence Face
Grade 3
The Lawrence Face takes a direct line up steep rock and snow to reach the west ridge close to the summit. From the lower Lawrence Glacier, climb scree slopes to the foot of a steep rocky buttress, between the two main icefalls, that rises almost to the summit. Follow the buttress to a snow-filled couloir that leads to the upper ridge. Continue on the Lawrence Col side of the ridge until a large schrund is reached. Cross this and take a short couloir to the summit ridge, then traverse over several bumps to the summit. This rock is loose but not especially difficult.
ER
East Ridge
Grade 0
From Lawrence Col follow the tricky ridge, keeping on the Reischek faces as much as possible. The large gap in the ridge west of Pt 2539 metres is passed on the Reischek side – start the traverse well before the gap. Alternatively, in good conditions, climb directly to the gap to avoid the first section of ridge.
NA
North Arête
Grade 0
Follow loose rock on the North Arête to join the summit ridge east of the summit. From here traverse numerous pinnacles to the top.
NS
North Spur
Grade 2.25
From the Reischek névé a distinctive spur juts out from the main Red Peak massif into the glacier. A small snow col on this spur provides a starting point for a climb up faces of reasonably firm rock leading directly to or just west of the summit. This is the most commonly used ascent route.
WR
West Ridge
Grade 0
From the Reischek Glacier head around the névé under the peak and follow snow to the col between Mt Gould and Red Peak. From here easy climbing on loose rock slabs leads to a short ill-defined ridge which merges with the upper northern face, then follow a series of short sharp gullies to the summit.
Alpine - 8 routes - avg. grade 2 0 - 2.75 3+
NorthNorthpk1

Lawrence Face The steep buttresses of the Lawrence Face of North Peak remain unclimbed directly to the summit, despite several attempts. Note that the routes marked on the topo above are approximate.

Attribution: Yvonne Cook and Geoff Spearpoint, in association with the Canterbury Mountaineering Club

SR
South Ridge
Grade 2.75
The South Ridge was originally reached from Jagged Stream but can be approached from the Lawrence side via the north arm of the Lawrence Glacier. From here, climb a rock step to reach the glacier draining the north-west side of Lawrence Peak and so the long South Ridge. Once on this narrow, loose and steep ridge, negotiate towers and guts to the summit.
CH
Cousins-Harrison
Grade 0
Climb the face to join the South Ridge 30 metres east of the summit. The pair made a further two unsuccessful attempts to reach the summit directly.
OR
Original Route
Grade 0
Start up the prominent couloir to the right of the summit. Rockfall forced the party to the right, on to the face, and they gained the south ridge about 100 metres below the summit but didn’t continue to the top.
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East Couloir
Grade 0
The couloir rises from about the 1800-metre couloir, to the east of North Peak, and leads to the northernmost of the Gridiron Glaciers. Initially keep to rocks on the left, or climb the couloir from the bottom halfway to its head, and then move on to broken and jumbled rock to gain the final rock ridge, which is loose and exposed in places. Beware of falling rock and ice.
NR
North Ridge
Grade 2.25
From Reischek Col the ridge is narrow and loose. Alternatively, cross the Assault Glacier at about half height and traverse snow slopes, climbing to the ridge at about its midpoint.
NWB
North West Buttress
Grade 3
From the head of the Reischek Glacier climb rock to the left of a snow couloir which leads on to the North Ridge. After the first 100 metres or so the climbing gets more difficult and it may be necessary to traverse into the couloir (prone to rock fall). Regain the buttress where possible and climb a large chimney. Once through the chimney, cross the face under the summit to join the North Ridge just below the summit.
NWF
North West Face
Grade 1.75
From the Reischek névé the route starts in an easy gully, followed by rock climbing. Direct but not hard.
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West Ridge
Grade 3
From Lawrence Col follow the ridge on generally sound rock. The crux is at the end of the first pitch.